Weekly Iowa Crops and Weather Report

Weekly Iowa Crop and Weather Report

Weekly Iowa Crop and Weather Report

NAIG COMMENTS ON IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, September 17, 2018

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“A dry week of weather allowed farmers to get back into fields to make hay, chop silage and start harvest, with two percent corn and soybeans now harvested. With 53 percent of corn now mature and 50 percent of soybeans dropping leaves, we will likely see the harvest advance even more quickly as long as conditions allow,” Naig said.

The weekly report is also available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site atwww.nass.usda.gov/ia. The report summary follows here:

CROP REPORT

Warm, dry weather gave Iowa farmers 6.0 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending September 16, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Activities for the week included harvesting hay, harvesting seed corn, chopping corn silage, harvesting corn for grain, harvesting soybeans and seeding cover crops.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 1 percent very short, 5 percent short, 84 percent adequate and 10 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 3 percent very short, 7 percent short, 77 percent adequate and 13 percent surplus. South central Iowa topsoil moisture supplies rated 75 percent adequate to surplus for the second consecutive week.

Ninety-four percent of the corn crop has reached the dent stage or beyond, a week ahead of the 5-year average. Fifty-three percent of the corn crop was mature, just over a week ahead of average. Corn condition rated 73 percent good to excellent. Eighty-three percent of the soybean crop was coloring with 50 percent dropping leaves, 8 days ahead of average. Soybean condition rated 72 percent good to excellent.

The third cutting of alfalfa hay was 94 percent complete, a week behind the previous year. Pasture conditions rated 50 percent good to excellent. Warm and dry conditions helped dry out feedlots.

 

IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY

By Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

After a very wet beginning to September, Iowa had unseasonably dry conditions with no National Weather Service stations observing measurable rainfall during the reporting period; the average expected weekly rainfall is 0.79 inches. Statewide temperatures were also warmer than normal, especially in northwestern Iowa. Average temperature departures were up to 11 degrees above normal. Monday (10th) was unseasonable cool with average highs ranging from the low to upper 70s, up to four degrees below average. New Hampton (Chickasaw County) observed a high of 70 degrees, five degrees below normal. Waukon (Allamakee County) observed the week’s low temperature of 41 degrees. A warming trend began Tuesday (11th) with temperatures rising into the upper 70s and lower 80s in Iowa’s northwestern two-thirds. Wednesday (12th) was unseasonably warm with highs in the low to mid-80s; Lowden (Cedar County) observed a high of 85 degrees, almost eight degrees above normal. High pressure continued to dominate Thursday (13th) into Friday (14th) allowing temperatures to remain above average. The weekend was very warm across Iowa with high temperatures well above average along with increasing humidity. On Saturday (15th) highs ranged from the mid-80s into the low 90s, up to 17 degrees warmer than normal. Sunday (16th) was the warmest day of the week with low to mid-90s across much of western Iowa and upper 80s over the remaining portions of the state. Clarinda (Page County) observed the week’s high temperature of 95 degrees, almost 19 degrees above average.

NAIG COMMENTS ON IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, September 10, 2018

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Another week of wet weather kept farmers from the fields and caused significant flooding in parts of the state. Corn and soybeans continue to move towards maturity and there is likely to be harvest activity starting over the next few weeks as conditions allow,” Naig said.

The weekly report is also available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site atwww.nass.usda.gov/ia. The report summary follows here:

CROP REPORT

With another week of widespread rainfall, Iowa farmers had just 2.1 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending September 9, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Activities for the week included harvesting seed corn, chopping corn silage and moving grain.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 1 percent very short, 3 percent short, 65 percent adequate and 31 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 2 percent very short, 7 percent short, 67 percent adequate and 24 percent surplus. Drought concerns in south central and southeast Iowa were eased after recent storms lifted adequate to surplus topsoil moisture ratings to 75 percent or greater.

Ninety-eight percent of the corn crop has reached the dough stage or beyond with 87 percent dented or beyond, a week ahead of the 5-year average. Twenty-eight percent of the corn crop was mature, also one week ahead of average. Corn condition rated 73 percent good to excellent. Fifty-eight percent of the soybean crop was coloring with 17 percent dropping leaves, 5 days ahead of average. Soybean condition rated 72 percent good to excellent. In spite of limited days suitable for fieldwork, there were a few reports of both corn for grain and soybeans being harvested.

The third cutting of alfalfa hay was 83 percent complete, more than a week behind the previous year as weather conditions continued to slow progress. Pasture conditions improved to 50 percent good to excellent. Heavy rains made feedlot conditions challenging for cattle producers.

IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY

By Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

The first full week of September had above average precipitation statewide. Temperatures were near to slightly above average, especially in eastern Iowa. Multiple waves of showers and thunderstorms moved across Iowa Monday (3rd) through Wednesday (5th), bringing locally heavy rain and isolated severe weather. On Labor Day, most of Iowa’s southeastern two-thirds reported rainfall. During the evening hours, two counties in eastern Iowa had tornadic activity; in Linn County, two EF-1 tornadoes with winds between 100 and 110 mph were reported near Cedar Rapids. Minor structural damage, uprooted trees, and blown over crops were observed. Vinton (Benton County) also reported two EF-0 tornadoes with winds in excess of 80 mph. On Tuesday (4th) many parts of northwestern Iowa that missed out on Monday’s rain received above normal accumulations. Some thunderstorms were severe, with Algona (Kossuth County) reporting 4.02 inches of rain (3.92 inches above average) and structural damage from a brief tornado touchdown. A cold front moved through on Wednesday bringing widespread measurable rainfall into Thursday (6th). Flash flood warnings were issued as slow-moving storms lingered over central and eastern Iowa. Two-day rainfall totals averaged above one inch across 75 counties; Montezuma (Poweshiek County) reported 5.20 inches. Thursday was cooler than average statewide with highs in the low to mid-70s. The southeastern quadrant observed measurable rainfall; Ottumwa (Wapello County) reported 0.42 inches. Rain showers moved into Iowa’s southern third early Friday (7th) and lingered into Saturday (8th) as the remains of Tropical Depression Gordon moved through Missouri. Rainfall totals were generally under an inch with Bloomfield (Davis County) reporting 1.10 inches. The rest of the weekend saw pleasant conditions across Iowa. Temperatures were unseasonably cool with highs ranging from the mid-60s to mid-70s. Sunday (9th) was the nicest day of the week, with generally sunny skies and dry conditions.

NAIG COMMENTS ON IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, September 4, 2018

DES MOINES – Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“A series of storms brought significant rainfall to much of the state and caused flooding conditions in some areas. Crop development remains well ahead of average and we could start to see more harvest activity in the next couple of weeks if conditions allow,” Naig said.

The weekly report is also available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site atwww.nass.usda.gov/ia. The report summary follows here:

 CROP REPORT

Widespread rainfall meant Iowa farmers had just 2.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending September 2, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Activities for the week included cutting hay, chopping corn silage, and moving grain.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 4 percent very short, 6 percent short, 69 percent adequate and 21 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 6 percent very short, 9 percent short, 71 percent adequate and 14 percent surplus. Much of southern Iowa received multiple inches of rain over the past week, easing moisture concerns in some areas although levels are still mostly short to very short.

Ninety-five percent of the corn crop has reached the dough stage or beyond with 77 percent dented or beyond, over a week ahead of both last year and the 5-year average. Fifteen percent of the corn crop was mature, 8 days ahead of average. There were a few reports of corn harvested for grain. Corn condition rated 74 percent good to excellent. Almost one-third of the soybean crop was coloring with 4 percent dropping leaves. Soybean condition rated 72 percent good to excellent.

The third cutting of alfalfa hay was 79 percent complete, now over a week behind the previous year as weather conditions allowed for little progress in cutting hay. Pasture conditions improved to 47 percent good to excellent.

 IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY

By Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

The final week of August was warmer and wetter than normal. Many locations received rainfall between two to four inches above normal, including drought-stricken areas in southern Iowa. Average temperatures were up to four degrees warmer than normal. A series of convective systems moved across Iowa on Monday (27th) bringing moderate rainfall to much of the eastern two-thirds of the state. The northern-most tier of counties also experienced severe thunderstorm with heavy rain; Cresco (Howard County) observed 3.32 inches. There were multiple reports of hail from Sioux to Palo Alto counties, with three-inch diameter hail in Ayrshire. Tuesday (28th) was also an active weather day as a strong cold front swept through the state, bringing severe thunderstorms and locally heavy rain to northern and southeastern Iowa. Over 30 stations recorded rainfall above one inch, with Keokuk (Lee County) reporting 4.90 inches. High pressure moved into Iowa on Wednesday (29th) bringing generally clear skies and cooler temperatures. This pattern persisted into Thursday (30th) as the high moved across the state. Average highs were unseasonably cool, ranging from the low 70s in the north to mid-70s and low 80s in the south. Friday (31st), Saturday (1st) and Sunday (2nd) saw waves of showers and thunderstorms across Iowa, with many locations reporting multiple inches of rain. Traer (Tama County) observed 5.42 inches on Saturday; Montezuma (Poweshiek County) reported 5.16 inches on Sunday. There were also multiple reports of severe hail and straight-line winds across 11 counties. Two-inch diameter hail was reported in Cass County on Friday and in Polk County on Saturday. Tree damage from severe high winds was observed in Dubuque (Dubuque County) on Sunday. Average highs over the weekend were generally a few degrees warmer than normal, with Lamoni (Decatur County) observing 91 degrees on Sunday.

NAIG COMMENTS ON IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, August 27, 2018

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Farmers are chopping silage and we have started to see seed corn harvest getting underway as well,” Naig said. “Much of the state received significant rainfall last week, including parts of southern Iowa which have been in drought condition. Even with that recent rainfall, more than 90 percent of subsoil in south central and southeast Iowa is still rated as short or very short of moisture.”

The weekly report is also available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site atwww.nass.usda.gov/ia. The report summary follows here:

CROP REPORT

Iowa farmers had 4.0 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending August 26, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Activities for the week included cutting hay, chopping corn silage, harvesting oats for grain, spraying for aphids, and moving grain.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 7 percent very short, 14 percent short, 70 percent adequate and 9 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 8 percent very short, 16 percent short, 70 percent adequate and 6 percent surplus. In spite of recent rains, subsoil moisture levels in south central and southeast Iowa continue to remain critically low with greater than 90 percent rated short to very short.

Ninety-two percent of the corn crop has reached the dough stage or beyond, 8 days ahead of the 5-year average. Corn dented was at 63 percent, 9 days ahead of last year. Seven percent of the corn crop was mature, 9 days ahead of average. Seed corn harvest has begun. Corn condition rated 73 percent good to excellent. Ninety-six percent of the soybean crop was setting pods with 11 percent coloring, 4 days ahead of last year and 5 days ahead of the average. Soybean condition rated 70 percent good to excellent. Ninety-eight percent of the oat crop has been harvested for grain.

The third cutting of alfalfa hay was 75 percent complete, 4 days behind the previous year but 1 week ahead of the average. Pasture conditions improved slightly to 43 percent good to excellent. Although pastures in south central and southwest Iowa were able to refresh after receiving much needed precipitation, some producers have been forced to haul water to livestock.

IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY

By Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Cooler conditions were observed statewide during the reporting period with average temperatures up to five degrees below normal in some locations. Much of Iowa also saw above average rainfall accumulations, generally ranging from one to three inches. A large low pressure system continued to spin over the state on Monday (20th), bringing heavy rainfall to northern and western Iowa. Over fifty stations reported precipitation totals above one inch; Fort Dodge (Webster County) recorded 3.95 inches. A weak tornado was also reported during the evening in Clinton County, damaging crops and trees. High pressure dominated on Tuesday (21st), bringing cooler conditions to Iowa. Average highs were well below normal, especially in western Iowa; Denison (Crawford County) observed a high of 65 degrees, almost 18 degrees below average. Cool and dry conditions continued into Wednesday (22nd) and over much of the state on Thursday (23rd), as the high pressure propagated across northern Missouri. Showers and thunderstorms moved into southwest Iowa Thursday morning, bringing measurable rainfall. Another complex of thunderstorms developed along the Iowa-Missouri border early Friday (24th) bringing much needed rain to southeastern Iowa. Multiple stations in Appanoose, Davis, and Wapello counties observed rainfall between one and two inches, with isolated totals nearing three inches. Severe storms also formed and moved rapidly through northern Iowa, with a few severe hail and high wind reports from Buffalo Center (Kossuth County) to Mason City (Cerro Gordo County). Leftover thundershowers moved out of eastern Iowa early Saturday (25th), leaving minor accumulations. On Sunday (26th) another round of thunderstorms fired along a warm front, with two severe wind reports that evening in north central Iowa. Weekend temperatures were up to four degrees warmer across much of Iowa, with Donnellson (Lee County) observing the week’s high temperature of 95 degrees.

NAIG COMMENTS ON IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, August 20, 2018

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Crops progress remains well ahead of average and we are looking at a potentially early harvest if conditions continue to cooperate,” Naig said. “Many parts of the state are welcoming the recent rain showers as they have come during a critically important time in soybean development and should help boost yields.”

The weekly report is also available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site atwww.nass.usda.gov/ia. The report summary follows here:

CROP REPORT

Iowa farmers had 5.1 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending August 19, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Activities for the week included harvesting hay and oats for grain, chopping corn silage, spraying for aphids, and moving grain.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 11 percent very short, 19 percent short, 64 percent adequate and 6 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 10 percent very short, 19 percent short, 66 percent adequate and 5 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels in south central and southeast Iowa remain critical with 95 percent or more rated short to very short.

Eighty-five percent of the corn crop has reached the dough stage or beyond, 9 days ahead of the 5-year average. Corn dented was at 42 percent, 9 days ahead of last year. Corn condition rated 73 percent good to excellent. Ninety-eight percent of the soybean crop was blooming with 93 percent setting pods, 1 week ahead of last year and 8 days ahead of the average. Soybean condition declined slightly to 70 percent good to excellent. Ninety-five percent of the oat crop has been harvested for grain.

The third cutting of alfalfa hay was 66 percent complete, 5 days behind the previous year but 8 days ahead of the average. Pasture conditions declined to 41 percent good to excellent. While some feedlots in northwest Iowa have been dealing with mud, dry conditions in southern Iowa have resulted in CRP being released for emergency grazing.

IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY

By Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

The week started off warm and dry with average daytime highs up to six degrees above normal on Monday (13th). DeSoto (Harrison County) observed a high of 94 degrees, almost 10 degrees warmer than average. A low pressure system spinning over eastern Kansas brought rainfall to Iowa’s southern half on Tuesday (14th), with Des Moines (Polk County) recording 0.51 inches. A few stations from Lamoni (Decatur County) to Marshalltown (Marshall County) also recorded accumulating rain. Thundershowers lingered into Wednesday (15th) with isolated thunderstorms reforming in the afternoon across much of the state. Fifteen stations observed rainfall over 1 inch, with Red Oak (Montgomery County) reporting 2.49 inches. These storms dissipated by nightfall. Temperatures were above average during this period, with lower 90s in southern Iowa and upper 80s over the rest of the state. Another convective system moved through on Thursday (16th) bringing thunderstorms to a significant portion of Iowa, especially north and east. Davenport (Scott County) observed 2.49 inches. With rainy conditions, temperatures ranged from near-normal to slightly warmer than average; highs were in the mid-80s in the southeast and lower 80s across the rest of Iowa. A high pressure system brought nice weather on Friday (17th) and Saturday (18th), with lingering thundershowers in eastern Iowa on Friday. After a dry Saturday, a large low pressure system moved into southwestern Iowa on Sunday (19th). As the low slowly moved north, significant accumulations were reported in Harrison, Shelby and Audubon counties. Much of Iowa recorded measurable rainfall with minor accumulation in the southeast quadrant, though weekly rainfall was below average across Iowa’s eastern two-thirds. Weekend temperatures were seasonal across the western third and slightly warmer than average over the rest of Iowa, with highs ranging from the upper 70s in the northwest to upper 80s in the south.

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