Weekly Iowa Crops and Weather Report

Weekly Iowa Crop and Weather Report

Weekly Iowa Crop and Weather Report

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of August 12-18, 2019

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Conditions report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Farmers across the state welcomed the precipitation that fell over the past few days,” said Secretary Naig. “Some areas reported an inch of rainfall, which will help improve the abnormally dry conditions and moisture stress that were reported in a few counties.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.  

Crop Report

Much needed rain fell across parts of Iowa during the week ending August 18, 2019, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Statewide there were 5.5 days suitable for fieldwork. Fieldwork activities included scouting, spraying fungicides and insecticides, and harvesting hay and oats.

Topsoil moisture condition was rated 6 percent very short, 25 percent short, 67 percent adequate and 2 percent surplus. Rain this past week helped improve topsoil moisture conditions except for the southeast district which remained at 64 percent short to very short. Subsoil moisture condition was rated 4 percent very short, 23 percent short, 71 percent adequate and 2 percent surplus.

Nearly all the corn crop has begun to silk at 96 percent statewide. Fifty-nine percent of the crop reached the dough stage, 12 days behind last year and 9 days behind the 5-year average. Seven percent of the crop reached the dented stage, 2 weeks behind last year and 10 days behind average. Corn condition rated 65 percent good to excellent.

Ninety-three percent of the soybean crop has started to bloom, 2 weeks behind last year and 10 days behind average. Seventy-one percent of the crop has started setting pods, 17 days behind last year and nearly 2 weeks behind average. Soybean condition declined slightly from the previous week to 61 percent good to excellent.

Oats harvested for grain has almost wrapped up at 97 percent complete statewide. The second cutting of alfalfa hay was nearly complete at 96 percent. The third cutting of alfalfa hay reached 36 percent, 9 days behind average. Hay condition rated 55 percent good to excellent.

Pasture condition declined for the seventh straight week and rated a season-low 42 percent good to excellent. Comments mentioned pasture regrowth has been slow and supplemental hay feeding has been used due to drier than normal pasture conditions. Some livestock has struggled with continued temperature fluctuations.

Weather Summary

Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

After a three-week stretch of drier than normal conditions across the state, portions of southern and western Iowa received above-average rainfall; the remaining parts of the state were near normal. Temperatures were slightly cooler than average with departures of one to two degrees below average across the state. The statewide average temperature was 70.9 degrees, 1.3 degrees below normal.

A low-pressure system continued to move across Iowa through the afternoon on Sunday (11th) bringing measurable rainfall from showers and thunderstorms. There were locally heavy downpours with a stronger line of storms in southwest Iowa. Cloudy conditions kept temperatures below average, generally in the upper 70s to low 80s. A second low-pressure system propagated through Iowa early on Monday (12th) morning bringing another wave of thunderstorms. As of 7 a.m., over 35 stations reported totals above an inch with Oakland (Pottawattamie County) reporting the highest 24-hour total of 2.82 inches. The average statewide rainfall was 0.39 inches. The system continued through eastern Iowa through the afternoon leaving behind 0.25 to 0.75 inches of rain in the northeast and southeast corners with isolated totals above an inch. Centerville (Appanoose County) reported 1.98 inches while Guttenberg Lock and Dam (Clayton County) observed 1.30 inches.

The system cleared the state overnight into Tuesday (13th) with lows dropping into the mid to upper 60s. Dense fog was also reported in central Iowa. Isolated strong storms clipped Iowa’s northeastern corner during the evening hours leaving behind rain totals ranging from 0.30 inches in Dubuque (Dubuque County) to 0.71 inches in Decorah (Winneshiek County).

A weak cold front dropped through Iowa early Wednesday (14th), producing unseasonably cool but pleasant conditions. The statewide average high was 75 degrees, eight degrees below average. Isolated showers formed on the backside of a low-pressure system over the Great Lakes, bringing light rain across eastern Iowa. Totals were generally under a tenth of an inch.

Cooler conditions prevailed Thursday (15th) under partly to mostly sunny skies. Highs stayed in the upper 70s and low 80s. Daytime temperatures on Friday (16th) remained seasonal with a light variable wind. Rain moved into southern Iowa on Saturday (17th) morning along with isolated thunderstorms throughout the day. Chariton (Lucas County) reported 0.95 inches of rain. A squall line ahead of a cold front brought much-needed rain to Iowa on Saturday night into Sunday (18th) morning. Totals across the state were above one inch at over 60 stations with isolated two-inch totals at several stations. There were also preliminary reports of a brief tornado in Rock Rapids (Lyon County) as well as in Grand Mound (Clinton County). Several severe straight-line wind events were reported in northwestern Iowa.

Weekly rainfall totals ranged from 0.24 inches in Charles City (Floyd County) to 4.97 inches in Atlantic (Cass County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 1.45 inches while the normal is 0.98 inches. The week’s high temperature of 89 degrees was reported on the 13th in Donnellson (Lee County) and Keosauqua (Van Buren County), on average three degrees above normal. Cresco (Howard County) reported the week’s low temperature of 50 degrees on the 15th, seven degrees below average.

 

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of August 5-11, 2019

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Conditions report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Overall, crops around the state are in good condition. Seasonable temperatures helped mitigate some crop stress in regions that received below-average rainfall,” said Secretary Naig. “I’m also hearing reports of thistle caterpillars and gray leaf spot so I encourage farmers to scout their fields.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.  

Crop Report

Iowa farmers continued to experience abnormally dry field conditions across most of the State during the week ending August 11, 2019, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Statewide there were 5.9 days suitable for fieldwork. Fieldwork activities included spraying fungicides and insecticides and harvesting hay and oats.

Topsoil moisture condition was rated 7 percent very short, 29 percent short, 62 percent adequate and 2 percent surplus. East central, south-central and southeast Iowa districts reported topsoil moisture conditions as over 55 percent short to very short. Subsoil moisture condition was rated 4 percent very short, 23 percent short, 70 percent adequate and 3 percent surplus.

Ninety-two percent of the corn crop has begun to silk, 17 days behind last year and nearly two weeks behind the 5-year average. Forty-one percent of the crop reached the dough stage, 10 days behind last year and 8 days behind average. One percent of the crop statewide reached the dented stage. Corn condition rated 65 percent good to excellent.

Eighty-seven percent of the soybean crop has started to bloom, 15 days behind last year and 12 days behind average. Fifty-six percent of the crop has started setting pods, also 15 days behind last year and 12 days behind average. Soybean condition rated 63 percent good to excellent.

Eighty-nine percent of the oat crop has been harvested for grain, 2 days behind both last year and average. The second cutting of alfalfa hay reached 92 percent, 5 days behind average. The third cutting of alfalfa hay reached 25 percent, 1 week behind average. Hay condition declined to 57 percent good to excellent.

Pasture condition declined for the sixth straight week and rated a season-low 46 percent good to excellent. There were no major livestock issues reported this past week.

Weather Summary

Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Unseasonably dry conditions continued for the third consecutive week across most of Iowa during the reporting period. The southwestern two-thirds of the state reported rainfall deficits between 0.50 inches to one inch. Temperatures were generally seasonable with departures of one to two degrees above and below average in western and eastern Iowa, respectively. The statewide average temperature was 72.8 degrees, 0.80 degrees above normal.

Partly to mostly sunny conditions prevailed over Iowa Sunday (4th) afternoon with a light southerly wind. High temperatures reached the mid-80s. Isolated thunderstorms popped up in north-central Iowa during the early morning hours of Monday (5th) ahead of a line of strong thunderstorms that sped through much of Iowa’s eastern half during the afternoon into the late-night hours. Some storms produced severe straight-line winds in northern Iowa. An EF-1 rated tornado was also reported southwest of Dubuque (Dubuque County) causing damage to corn, trees, and houses along its path. Much of the northeastern two-thirds of the state reported measurable rainfall; totals ranged from 0.01 inches in Lowden (Cedar County) to 1.68 inches in Stanley (Buchanan County) with the statewide average rainfall at 0.28 inches.

Tuesday (6th) and Wednesday (7th) were generally quiet as a high-pressure system sat over the Midwest. Parts of western Iowa experienced light rain on both days with totals under a tenth of an inch. Highs were in the low to mid-80s, a degree or two warmer than average.

Isolated showers and thunderstorms popped up in central Iowa during Thursday (8th) morning with a brief downpour on the opening ceremonies of the 160th Iowa State Fair in Des Moines (Polk County); a total of 0.22 inches was reported near the fairgrounds. Higher rain totals were found in east-central Iowa with Newton (Jasper County) reporting 0.42 inches and Montezuma (Poweshiek County) observing 0.40 inches.

Pleasant conditions returned to the state during the afternoon and into Friday (9th) as a weak cold front pushed out of southern Iowa. Highs were in the upper 70s across northeastern Iowa while the rest of the state experienced the 80s. Rain showers pushed into northwestern Iowa during the evening hours and remained into Saturday (10th) morning. Additional thundershowers popped up in north-central Iowa and moved east in two rounds into the afternoon hours. Daytime temperatures were slightly warmer than average, generally in the mid to upper 80s. A system of showers and thunderstorms moved into southwestern Iowa early Sunday (11th) morning. Rain totals reported at 7:00 am for the previous 24-hours, were mostly under one inch and in the range of 0.10 – 0.50 inches; Underwood (Pottawattamie County) reported 1.00 inch.

Weekly rainfall totals ranged from no accumulation at multiple stations within a band across south-central Iowa to 2.87 inches in Eagle Grove (Wright County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.49 inches while the normal is 0.96 inches. The week’s high temperature of 92 degrees was reported on the 5th in Muscatine (Muscatine County), seven degrees above average. Cresco (Howard County) reported the week’s low temperature of 49 degrees on the 9th, nine degrees below average.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of July 15-21, 2019

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“After several days of sweltering heat and limited precipitation, the crops got the rain they needed last weekend,” said Secretary Naig. “Farmers are very grateful for the mild temperatures forecasted over the next several days.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.  

Crop Report

Iowa farmers had 5.0 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 21, 2019, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistic Service. There were some reports of crops lying flat and green snap in corn due to high winds produced from various storms throughout the state. Fieldwork activities included spraying and harvesting hay and oats.

Topsoil moisture condition was rated 2 percent very short, 14 percent short, 78 percent adequate and 6 percent surplus. Districts in the southern third of Iowa and the east-central district reported topsoil moisture conditions as over 25 percent short to very short. Subsoil moisture condition was rated 1 percent very short, 9 percent short, 81 percent adequate and 9 percent surplus.

Forty-one percent of the corn crop has begun to silk, 12 days behind last year and 1 week behind the 5-year average. One percent of the crop reached the dough stage, 5 days behind last year and average. Corn condition rated 63 percent good to excellent. Forty-seven percent of the soybean crop has started to bloom, 13 days behind last year and 9 days behind average. Four percent of the crop has started setting pods, nearly 2 weeks behind average. Soybean condition rated 64 percent good to excellent.

Seventy-eight percent of oats started coloring, 4 days behind last year and 5 days behind average. Twelve percent of the oat crop has been harvested for grain, 9 days behind last year and average. Oat condition declined slightly from the previous week to 61 percent good to excellent. The second cutting of alfalfa hay reached 56 percent, 11 days behind last year and 8 days behind average. Hay condition rated 61 percent good to excellent. Pasture condition declined for the third straight week with 61 percent good to excellent. High temperatures this past week caused some stress to livestock.

Weather Summary

Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Thunderstorm activity was present across Iowa on nearly every day of the reporting period with much of the state reporting above-average rainfall. A large dome of high pressure over the Midwest also brought very hot conditions, including triple-digit heat indices Wednesday through Friday. The statewide average temperature was 79.6 degrees, 4.5 degrees above normal. Iowa experienced spotty showers and thunderstorms during the afternoon and evening on Sunday (14th) with Dubuque Lock and Dam (Dubuque County) reporting 0.53 inch of rain. High temperatures were in the upper 80s and lower 90s with the average high at 90 degrees, five degrees above normal.

Light rain showers formed across northern Iowa into Monday (15th) morning with only a handful of stations reporting measurable totals. Tuesday (16th) was a sunny and breezy day with winds out of the south. High temperatures were in the mid to upper 80s, one to two degrees above average. Moisture from the remains of Tropical Storm Barry helped thunderstorms from across Iowa’s northern half around midnight. The storms consolidated into a well-organized squall line that propagated from northwestern Iowa to the southeastern corner during the daytime hours on Wednesday (17th). There were several reports of severe straight-line winds across nine counties in northwest and southeast Iowa; Harlan (Shelby County) and Mediapolis (Des Moines County) observed 70 mph wind gusts.

A line of storms re-fired around midnight and extended into central Iowa early Thursday (18th) morning. Much of Iowa received measurable rainfall over the 24-hour period ending at 7 a.m. with multiple locations experiencing torrential downpours from stronger storms, especially across northern and south-central Iowa. Osage (Mitchell County) reported 2.60 inches while Rathbun Dam (Appanoose County) observed 1.98 inches. Statewide average precipitation was 0.70 inch, 0.54 inch above average. Temperatures varied from cooler than average in locations along the path of the squall to above average in southern and eastern Iowa.

As Thursday progressed, the band of thunderstorms gradually dissipated. In the absence of cloud cover and rainfall, highs were able to reach into the 90s, creating uncomfortable conditions. Overnight lows remained in the 70s across the state with pockets of low 80s in southwestern Iowa. The average minimum statewide temperature was 74 degrees, 11 degrees above average.

Friday (19th) was sweltering across Iowa as highs climbed into the lower 90s north and middle 90s south. Dew point temperatures were also in the upper 70s and lower 80s. The combination of heat and humidity boosted heat indices into triple digits under clear skies; Le Mars Municipal Airport (Plymouth County) reported 120 degrees while Keokuk Municipal Airport (Lee County) observed 110 degrees. The statewide average temperature was 92 degrees, eight degrees above average. Overnight lows mirrored what was experienced Thursday night.

Saturday (20th) was an active weather day with severe straight-line winds reported across 29 counties as a system of strong thunderstorms moved through Iowa. A majority of the state reported measurable rainfall, ranging from 0.10 inch in Dubuque (Dubuque County) to 1.95 inches in Knoxville (Marion County).

Light rain continued into Sunday (21st) morning in southern Iowa as a cold front moved through the state, bringing much cooler conditions. Weekly rainfall totals ranged from 0.11 inch at Fulton (Jackson County) and Le Claire Lock and Dam (Scott County) to 4.91 inches at Estherville Municipal Airport (Emmet County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 1.51 inches while the normal is 1.01 inches. The week’s high temperature of 99 degrees was reported on the 19th in Little Sioux (Harrison County), 13 degrees above average. Sibley (Osceola County) reported the week’s low temperature of 56 degrees on the 21st, four degrees below average. A maximum overnight low of 81 degrees was reported on the 19th at airports in Davenport (Scott County) and Ottumwa (Wapello County); these readings were 16 and 18 degrees above average, respectively.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of July 8-14, 2019

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“It was a hot, dry weekend across the state and we expect that trend to continue throughout this week,” said Secretary Naig. “As I’m traveling the state, I’ve noticed the earliest planted corn is starting to tassel.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Report

It was a dry week in Iowa that allowed farmers 6.0 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 14, 2019, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. This was the most days suitable for fieldwork this season. The recent dry weather helped farmers catch up on fieldwork activities; however, there were many comments that areas in Iowa now need rain to help crops continue to move along.

Topsoil moisture condition was rated 1 percent very short, 14 percent short, 78 percent adequate and 7 percent surplus. Districts in the southern third of Iowa reported topsoil moisture conditions with over 25 percent short to very short. This is the first time this season any district in Iowa reported topsoil moisture condition at 25 percent or higher short to very short.

Subsoil moisture condition was rated 0 percent very short, 9 percent short, 80 percent adequate and 11 percent surplus. Eight percent of the corn crop has begun to silk, 13 days behind last year and 10 days behind the 5-year average.

Corn condition rated 62 percent good to excellent. Nearly all of the expected soybean crop has emerged at 98 percent statewide. Twenty-six percent of the crop has started to bloom, 12 days behind last year and 9 days behind average.

Soybean condition rated 63 percent good to excellent. Ninety-six percent of the oat crop has headed, 1 week behind average. Fifty-five percent of the crop has started coloring, 5 days behind both last year and average. Oat condition improved from the previous week to 65 percent good to excellent.

Nearly all of the first cutting of alfalfa hay has been cut at 98 percent complete. The second cutting of alfalfa hay reached 33 percent, 11 days behind last year and 9 days behind average. Hay condition rated 61 percent good to excellent. Pasture condition declined to 65 percent good to excellent. Livestock experienced some stress due to heat.

Weather Summary

Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

A majority of Iowa experienced unseasonably dry conditions during the reporting period with the driest conditions across the state’s southern half; rainfall departures were between 1.00-1.25 inches. Temperatures were near normal across much of Iowa with sections of the state reporting slightly warmer than average conditions. The statewide average temperature was 75.3 degrees, 0.6 degrees above normal.

Partly to mostly sunny conditions were seen statewide Sunday (7th) afternoon with light variable winds. High temperatures were in the low to mid-80s, near to slightly below average by one to two degrees. Overnight lows into Monday (8th) were in the mid to upper 60s. Pleasant conditions continued through the day as a large dome of high pressure sat over the Great Lakes. A southerly wind pushed highs into the mid-80s under mostly clear skies. A line of showers and thunderstorms in advance of an approaching low-pressure system brought light rainfall to a few counties in southwest Iowa; totals at ranged from 0.03 inches in Holly Springs (Woodbury County) to 0.16 inches at a station in Council Bluffs (Pottawattamie County).

Thunderstorms re-fired on Tuesday (9th) ahead of a warm front during the late morning and continued into eastern Iowa during the late evening. There were two reports of an isolated, weak tornado in Scott County. Rainfall totals at 7 a.m. on Wednesday (10th) were highest across northern and eastern Iowa with Rock Valley (Sioux County) reporting 1.35 inches. Three stations in Clinton County reported totals from 0.85 inches to 0.87 inches. A cold front moved through Iowa on Wednesday bringing light showers to southwestern Iowa. Spotty showers popped up in eastern Iowa later in the evening. Rain totals for the day were generally under 0.10 inches. Northwest flow kept highs in the upper 70s and low 80s.

Dry conditions returned on Thursday (11th) with seasonable temperatures under sunny skies. The average statewide high was 85 degrees. Thunderstorms returned to Iowa on Friday (12th), some of which were severe. There were two reports of one-inch hail at Hawarden and Maurice in Sioux County. The storms stayed in western Iowa and dissipated after sunset.

A complex of thunderstorms moved into Iowa in the early morning hours on Saturday (13th) bringing another round of locally heavy rainfall. Higher totals were reported from stronger storms with Mapleton (Monona County) reporting 1.05 inches. Conditions were nice for the rest of the day with partly to mostly sunny skies. High temperatures remained seasonal, in the low to mid-80s; 90s were reported across southern Iowa. Overnight temperatures into Sunday (14th) were in the low to mid-70s, averaging six degrees warmer the normal statewide.

Weekly rainfall totals ranged from no accumulation at multiple south-central and southeastern stations to 1.75 inches in Cherokee (Cherokee County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.30 inches, which is less than one-third of the normal, 1.05 inches. The week’s high temperature of 93 degrees was reported on the 13th in Donnellson (Lee County), Lowden (Cedar County), Muscatine (Muscatine County) and Osceola (Clarke County). These readings are on average seven degrees above normal. Elkader (Clayton County) and Stanley (Buchanan County) reported the week’s low temperature of 54 degrees on the 13th, seven degrees below average.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of July 1-7, 2019

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Slightly above-average rain fall combined with consistently warmer weather has given crops across the state a boost,” said Naig. “Though some areas had below- average rain fall, soil moisture conditions remain adequate to surplus.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.  

Crop Report

While parts of Iowa experienced heavy rain, overall it was a hot, dry week which allowed farmers to get fieldwork done during the week ending July 7, 2019, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Statewide there were 4.6 days suitable for fieldwork. Fieldwork activities included planting, harvesting hay, spraying and applying nitrogen.

Topsoil moisture condition was rated 0 percent very short, 4 percent short, 80 percent adequate and 16 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture condition was rated 0 percent very short, 2 percent short, 77 percent adequate and 21 percent surplus.

Statewide, 1 percent of the corn crop has begun to silk, over 1 week behind last year and the 5-year average. Corn condition declined to 61 percent good to excellent. Soybean emergence reached 96 percent, 2 weeks behind average. Seven percent of the soybean crop has started to bloom, 12 days behind last year and 10 days behind average. Soybean condition rated 64 percent good to excellent.

Ninety-two percent of the oat crop has headed, 1 week behind last year and 6 days behind average. Twenty-eight percent of the crop has started coloring, 6 days behind average. Oat condition rated 61 percent good to excellent.

Ninety-four percent of the first cutting of alfalfa hay has been cut, nearly 1 week behind average. The second cutting of alfalfa hay reached 12 percent statewide, 11 days behind average. Hay condition rated 62 percent good to excellent. Pasture condition rated 69 percent good to excellent. Livestock experienced some stress due to heat. Feedlots continue to dry out.

Weather Summary

 Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

 The first week of July brought unseasonable warmth across Iowa with the average statewide temperature at 77.1 degrees, 3.4 degrees above normal. Showers and thunderstorms were reported on multiple days with parts of the northwestern quadrant receiving one to three inches of above average rainfall. Sections of eastern Iowa also observed unseasonable wetness, on the order of one to two inches.

An intense squall line moved north to south through eastern Iowa late Sunday (30th) afternoon producing severe wind reports across 20 counties, causing tree and structural damage. Sustained wind gusts varied from 58 mph in Burlington (Des Moines County) to 76 mph in Dubuque (Dubuque County). Heavy rain associated with stronger storms was reported at Guttenberg Lock and Dam (Clayton County) and Waucoma (Fayette County); these stations observed 1.47 inches and 1.35 inches, respectively.

Showers and thunderstorms skirted the Iowa-Minnesota border for much of Monday (July 1st) ahead of a low-pressure system in Nebraska. As the low moved east, a line of strong thunderstorms formed in northwestern Iowa. These slow-moving storms produced locally heavy downpours and flash flooding in some locations. Eleven stations reported totals above two inches with three stations above three inches; Orange City (Sioux County) reported 3.62 inches.

A stationary front draped across central Iowa and continued to be a forcing mechanism for thunderstorms on Tuesday (2nd). Storms began popping up in the late afternoon and intensified into the evening as they moved into eastern Iowa. Rain totals were heaviest in west-central Iowa. Wednesday (3rd) saw similar behavior over most of Iowa as thunderstorms popped up along the existing boundary, transitioning south and east as the day progressed. Locally heavy rain fell along isolated lines of stronger thunderstorms. Two-day rain totals were greatest across the central west-to-east third of Iowa with 66 stations reporting over an inch; nine stations reported over three inches in central Iowa with a station in Boone County observing 5.13 inches. The statewide average rainfall was 0.51 inch, 0.19 inch above average.

Two waves of showers and thunderstorms moved across northern Iowa on Independence Day (4th). Rainfall totals were in the general range of a quarter of an inch to over two inches. Cherokee (Cherokee County) reported 2.39 inches while Ionia (Chickasaw County) reported 2.11 inches. Temperatures were three degrees warmer than normal statewide with highs in the mid to upper 80s; eastern Iowa reported lower 90s.

Another line of thunderstorms moved into northwestern Iowa during the morning hours on Friday (5th), though it quickly dissipated in the afternoon. Rain totals ranged from 0.13 inch in Spirit Lake (Dickinson County) to 0.91 inches in Sibley (Osceola County). Isolated storms re-fired in eastern Iowa in the evening with locally heavy accumulations. Multiple stations across northeastern Iowa reported rainfall above one inch with Waukon (Allamakee County) observing 2.56 inches. Daytime highs were in the lower 90s in eastern Iowa, up to six degrees above average. The rest of Iowa experienced seasonal conditions under partly cloudy skies. Saturday (6th) was slightly cooler than normal with cloud cover that gradually dissipated through the day. Highs were in the upper 70s and lower 80s while overnight lows into Sunday (7th) cooled into the 60s under clear to partly cloudy skies.

Weekly rainfall totals ranged from no accumulation in Corning (Adams County) to 5.55 inches in Ogden (Boone County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 1.13 inches, slightly above the normal of 1.08 inches. The week’s high temperature of 97 degrees was reported on the 1st in Cherokee (Cherokee County), 12 degrees above normal. Cresco (Howard County) reported the week’s low temperature of 56 degrees on the 7th, three degrees below average.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of June 24-30, 2019

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“The much needed warmer temperatures have helped the crops progress,” said Secretary Naig. “Some parts of the state had below-average rainfall over the last seven days, but sub-soil moisture is still adequate for the crops to grow.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.  

Crop Report

Iowa experienced scattered storms across the state that delivered high winds and hail, limiting opportunities for fieldwork during the week ending June 30, 2019, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Statewide there were 4.4 days suitable for fieldwork. Fieldwork activities included planting, harvesting hay, and spraying.

Topsoil moisture condition was rated 0 percent very short, 2 percent short, 74 percent adequate and 24 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture condition was rated 0 percent very short, 1 percent short, 69 percent adequate and 30 percent surplus.

Corn condition improved to 64 percent good to excellent. Soybean planting has nearly finished with 97 percent of the expected soybean crop planted. Ninety percent of the crop has emerged, over two weeks behind the 5-year average, and one percent has started to bloom. Soybean condition rated 64 percent good to excellent, also an improvement from last week.

Seventy-nine percent of the oat crop has headed, 8 days behind last year and average. Nine percent of the crop has started coloring, nearly a week behind average. Oat condition rated 64 percent good to excellent.

Eighty-three percent of the first cutting of alfalfa hay has been cut, two weeks behind average. Reports that the second cutting of alfalfa hay has also begun across the state. Hay condition declined to 63 percent good to excellent. Pasture condition rated 70 percent good to excellent. Livestock experienced some stress with the recent heat. Feedlots remain muddy but have started to improve.

Weather Summary

Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

 Unseasonably dry conditions were reported across a majority of the state with locations across northern Iowa observing above average rainfall; west-central Iowa experienced rainfall deficits over an inch below normal. Unseasonable warmness also returned to the state over the reporting period with the average temperature of 2.50 degrees above the normal of 73.0 degrees. 

A low-pressure system and attendant cold front propagated across Iowa on Sunday (23rd), producing showers and thunderstorms. Partly to mostly cloudy conditions prevailed across the state with highs only reaching into the low to mid-70s. Rainfall totals at 7 a.m. on Monday (24th) ranged from 0.01 inches in Sioux City (Woodbury County) to 2.22 inches in Ringsted (Emmet County).

Tuesday (25th) was an active weather day for Iowa’s southern half. Thunderstorms began to pop up in the early afternoon hours with some becoming severe. Thunderstorms continued to form over this region into the nighttime hours. There were multiple reports of hail across nine counties with Murray (Clarke County) reporting a 2.00-inch hailstone. There were also a few reports of severe straight-line winds causing tree damage from Decatur to Davis counties. Rainfall totals were in the general range of 0.25 to 1.00 inches across the southern third of Iowa. Locally heavy rain also accompanied some of these thunderstorms; Creston (Union County) reported 1.92 inches, 1.78 inches above average. Thunderstorm activity continued across western Iowa into Wednesday (26th) until the system dissipated around midday. Skies cleared allowing highs to reach into the low to mid-80s.

Strong thunderstorms, some of which turned severe, moved across northern Iowa during the early morning hours of Thursday (27th). Multiple occurrences of severe straight-line winds and large hail were reported from Sioux County to Jones County. Locally heavy rain totals were also observed. Thirteen stations reported rainfall above two inches with New Hampton (Chickasaw County) observing 3.52 inches, 3.34 inches above normal. High temperatures across the northern third of Iowa stayed in the low to mid-70s where clouds and rain were present. The rest of the state saw temperatures in the upper 80s and low 90s, four to five degrees above average. 

A large swath of east-central Iowa experienced thunderstorms on Friday (28th) as a mesoscale convective system (MCS) moved south from Minnesota. The storms intensified as they moved into southern Iowa, producing downpours and severe straight-line wind reports from Marion County to Des Moines County; 11 counties had high wind reports with minor tree and/or structural damage. Bloomfield (Davis County) also reported quarter-sized hail. Much of eastern Iowa observed measurable rain with totals along the path of the MCS between 0.50 and 1.00 inch. Eight stations reported totals over an inch with Albia (Monroe County) observing 1.68 inches.

Saturday (29th) was the warmest day of the year statewide with average highs in the low 90s across northeastern Iowa and mid to upper 90s across the rest of the state; the average high was 95 degrees, eight degrees above average. Isolated thunderstorms popped up in eastern Iowa, leaving behind 1.14 inches in Dubuque (Dubuque County). Overnight lows into Sunday (30th) remained well above average under generally clear skies. Under light southerly winds, the average low was 71 degrees, nine degrees above normal statewide.

Weekly rainfall totals ranged from 0.01 inches in Des Moines (Polk County) to 4.27 inches in Creston (Union County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.95 inches, while the normal is 1.16 inches. The week’s high temperature of 98 degrees was observed in Little Sioux (Harrison County) and Mapleton (Monona County) on the 29th, 13 degrees above normal. Cresco (Howard County) reported the week’s low temperature of 53 degrees on the 26th, five degrees below average.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of June 17-23, 2019

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“The cool, wet weather pattern persisted across much of the state last week,” said Secretary Naig. “Now that most farmers are done planting, we need some warmer temperatures to help the crops catch up.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.  

Crop Report

Another wet week as showers and thunderstorms moved through the State meant Iowa farmers had limited opportunities for fieldwork during the week ending June 23, 2019, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Statewide there were just 3.1 days suitable for fieldwork. Fieldwork activities included planting, harvesting hay, spraying and applying nitrogen.

Topsoil moisture condition was rated 0 percent very short, 1 percent short, 68 percent adequate and 31 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture condition was rated 0 percent very short, 1 percent short, 62 percent adequate and 37 percent surplus.

Ninety-six percent of the expected corn crop has emerged, two weeks behind last year and 15 days behind the 5-year average. Corn condition improved to 62 percent good to excellent. Ninety-five percent of the expected soybean crop has been planted, two weeks behind average. Eighty-one percent of the crop has emerged, over two weeks behind last year and average. Soybean condition rated 63 percent good to excellent, also an improvement from the last report.

Oats headed reached 58 percent, eight days behind last year and average, while 3 percent of the crop has started coloring. Oat condition rated 63 percent good to excellent. Wet conditions slowed progress on the first cutting of alfalfa hay with just 73 percent of the crop harvested statewide, nearly two weeks behind average. Hay condition rated 66 percent good to excellent. Pasture condition continued to improve and rated 69 percent good to excellent. Feedlots were muddy after recent rainfalls.

Preliminary Weather Summary

Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

An unsettled and active weather pattern across the Midwest brought multiple days of showers and thunderstorms across Iowa during the reporting period. The western two-thirds of Iowa experienced above average rainfall while the northeast corner was slightly drier than average. Unseasonable coolness also continued across the state. Temperatures averaged 67.2 degrees, 4.1 degrees below normal.

A warm front draped across central Iowa mid-afternoon Sunday (16th), setting up a stark temperature contrast across the state. Eastern Iowa reported highs in the mid to upper 60s, around 10-15 degrees below average. Temperatures across western Iowa reached the low to mid-80s, near normal for June. A cold front moved through on Monday (17th) bringing measurable rainfall across Iowa’s northwestern third. Slow-moving thunderstorms brought locally heavy amounts; rain totals ranged from 0.25 inches to over 1.50 inches; Pocahontas (Pocahontas County) reported 1.60 inches, 1.43 inches above average.

The cold front continued to move through Iowa on Tuesday (18th) with measurable rain across much of the state. Isolated thunderstorms fired in Iowa’s southwestern corner; Atlantic (Cass County) and Randolph (Fremont County) reported 24-hour totals of 1.58 and 1.84 inches, respectively. High temperatures ranged from the upper 70s to low 80s in southern Iowa and 70s across the rest of the state. The average statewide high was 74 degrees, eight degrees below normal.

A weak low-pressure system moving through northern Missouri brought showers to southern Iowa early on Wednesday (19th). Additional development over central and southeastern Iowa during the afternoon and evening hours brought locally heavy rainfall to a handful of stations across three counties in extreme southeast Iowa; Salem (Henry County) reported 2.74 inches while Keokuk Lock and Dam (Lee County) observed 1.77 inches.

A stagnant low-pressure system sat over the Midwest beginning Thursday (20th), bringing waves of showers and thunderstorms through the weekend. Isolated showers and a few thunderstorms moved through Iowa during Thursday morning and afternoon. Western Iowa reported the highest totals with Sac City (Sac County) observing 2.40 inches, 2.21 inches above average. High temperatures remained cooler than average under cloudy skies, generally in the 70s statewide.

Friday (21st) started off very wet as a line of strong thunderstorms sped across the state, leaving measurable rainfall at most stations. The second round of storms moved through southern Iowa in the late night hours into Saturday (22nd). Rain totals at 7 a.m. were highest in central Iowa with Des Moines International Airport (Polk County) reporting 2.41 inches. Locations east and west had general totals between 0.20 to 1.00 inches; 20 stations reported over an inch with the statewide average at 0.45 inches, 0.28 inches above average.

The remainder of Saturday was cool and wet across much of Iowa with highs in the mid to upper 70s, six degrees below normal. Thunderstorms moved into southwestern Iowa during the late afternoon and moved into central and eastern Iowa during the late evening hours. Some locations experienced torrential downpours and flash flooding in central Iowa from the large convective complex. There were also a few reports of severe hail and high winds. The system slowly moved through Iowa into Sunday (23rd) morning. Rain totals ranged from 0.01 inches in Sac City (Sac County) to 1.98 inches in Des Moines (Polk County).

Weekly rainfall totals ranged from 0.23 inches at Cresco (Howard County) to 5.01 inches in Allerton (Wayne County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 1.73 inches, while the normal is 1.17 inches. The week’s high temperature of 86 degrees was observed in Oakland (Pottawattamie County) on the 17th, four degrees above normal. Cedar Rapids (Linn County) reported the week’s low temperature of 49 degrees on the 18th, 12 degrees below average.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of June 10-16, 2019

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“There were 5.3 days suitable for fieldwork last week and farmers took advantage of the drier conditions to get nearly 98 percent of the state’s corn crop planted,” said Secretary Naig. “We know some farmers are still planting beans. If the weather continues to cooperate, most of the state should wrap up the 2019 planting season this week.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Report

For the second week in a row, mostly dry weather conditions allowed Iowa farmers to get work done in their fields. Statewide there were 5.3 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending June 16, 2019, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Fieldwork activities included planting and replanting of crops, harvesting hay, spraying and applying nitrogen.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 4 percent short, 77 percent adequate and 19 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 1 percent short, 70 percent adequate and 29 percent surplus.

Corn planting has nearly finished with 98 percent of the expected corn crop planted. Eighty-eight percent of the crop has emerged, over two weeks behind last year and the 5-year average. Corn condition improved slightly to 59 percent good to excellent. Eighty-nine percent of the expected soybean crop has been planted, 16 days behind last year and 2 weeks behind average. Sixty-three percent of the crop has emerged, two weeks behind average. The first soybean condition rating of the season came in at 2 percent very poor, 4 percent is poor, 33 percent fair, 53 percent good and 8 percent excellent. Oats headed reached 41 percent, 6 days behind last year and average. Oat condition rated 62 percent good to excellent.

Dry weather allowed over one-quarter of the first cutting of alfalfa hay to be harvested last week, reaching 61 percent complete. Hay condition improved to 65 percent good to excellent. Pasture and range condition rated 66 percent good to excellent. There were no livestock issues reported and feedlot conditions improved with the drier weather.

Preliminary Weather Summary

Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Unseasonably cool temperatures returned to Iowa after a week of warmer than normal conditions. Drier than normal conditions also prevailed across a majority of the state with rainfall deficits between a half to an inch below normal in the western half of Iowa. Pockets of above average rainfall were found in north-central and eastern Iowa.

A weak cold front moved through on Sunday (9th) bringing cooler than normal conditions across western Iowa. Overnight lows into Monday (10th) remained cool, dipping into the low to mid-50s; northwestern Iowa reported lows in the upper 40s, six to nine degrees below average. Monday was dry and windy under mostly sunny skies. Northwest winds behind the cold front kept highs in the upper 70s, two degrees below average statewide. Tuesday (11th) saw rainy conditions across much of the state as multiple waves of showers and a few thunderstorms moved through Iowa ahead of a low-pressure system. Northern and western Iowa saw the highest rainfall accumulations, with totals up to 0.20 inches above normal.

The low and attendant cold front continued to move through on Wednesday (12th) bringing measurable rain across much of Iowa. Two-day rain totals, reported at 7 a.m. on Thursday (13th), ranged from 0.10 inches in Van Meter (Dallas County) to 0.86 inches in Waukon (Allamakee County). The statewide average was 0.22 inches, 0.12 inches below average. Thursday was pleasant and mostly sunny, as a high-pressure system over Missouri brought nice conditions across to the region. Highs were in the low to mid-70s in eastern Iowa and mid to upper 70s across the western half; temperatures statewide were six degrees below average.

Friday (14th) remained unseasonably cool under partly to mostly cloudy skies with rain showers moving across much of the state. Another wave of showers moved through extreme southern Iowa into the morning hours on Saturday (15th). Rain totals for the 24-hour period ending at 7 a.m. were generally under 0.10 inches with higher accumulations near the Iowa-Missouri border. Creston (Union County) reported 0.67 inches.

Saturday afternoon was active with thunderstorms firing in an unstable atmosphere, initially across northern and eastern Iowa. Many of the thunderstorms turned severe almost immediately with multiple reports of hail and straight-line winds across 12 counties. A landspout tornado also reportedly caused barn damage in Whitten (Hardin County). As the afternoon progressed, strong storms began to pop in central Iowa and eventually consolidated into a squall line that moved into eastern Iowa during the evening hours. There were pockets of moderate to heavy rainfall with totals ranging from 0.22 inches in Dakota City (Humboldt County) to 2.28 inches in Toledo (Tama County); nearly 20 stations reported measurements above one inch. The statewide average rainfall was 0.74 inches, 0.57 inches above average. Overnight lows into Sunday (16th) remained near seasonal with temperatures in the low to mid-60s.

Weekly rainfall totals ranged 0.10 inches at Allerton (Wayne County) to 2.59 inches in Garwin (Tama County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 1.06 inches, while the normal is 1.19 inches. Temperatures averaged 65.0 degrees, 5.2 degrees below normal. The week’s high temperature of 88 degrees was observed in Ames (Story County) and Des Moines (Polk County) on the 15th, on average six degrees above normal. Estherville Municipal Airport (Emmet County) reported the week’s low temperature of 40 degrees on the 13th, 17 degrees below average.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of June 3-9, 2019

 Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Farmers finally got a much needed break from the rain and were able to make significant progress on fieldwork,” said Secretary Naig. “Many farmers breathed a sigh of relief as they finished planting over the weekend. If the favorable weather conditions continue, most of the state should be done planting by the end of this week.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.  

Crop Report

Iowa farmers finally got the dryer weather they were looking for with 5.2 days suitable for fieldwork statewide during the week ending June 9, 2019, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. This is the first time this season farmers had more than 5.0 days suitable for field work. This allowed farmers to plant corn and soybeans, cut hay, and spray fields with nitrogen.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 1 percent short, 73 percent adequate and 26 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 0 percent short, 67 percent adequate and 33 percent surplus.

Ninety-three percent of the expected corn crop has been planted, over two weeks behind last year and almost 3 weeks behind the 5-year average. Seventy-three percent of the crop has emerged, over two weeks behind last year and average. Corn condition rated 58 percent good to excellent.

Nearly one-third of the expected soybean crop was planted this past week. Iowa soybean growers now have 70 percent of the expected crop planted, 17 days behind last year and average. Thirty-five percent of the crop has emerged, over two weeks behind last year and average.

Nearly all of the oats crop has emerged with 18 percent of the crop headed, 1 week behind last year and 8 days behind average. Oat condition rated 63 good to excellent.

Nearly one-third of the State’s first cutting of alfalfa hay was cut this past week. However, at 35 percent complete statewide, the first cutting is behind last year by 10 days and 8 days behind average. Hay condition improved to 63 percent good to excellent. Pasture condition rated 66 percent good to excellent, also an improvement. There was little stress on livestock this past week, but feedlots remain muddy.

Preliminary Weather Summary

Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Iowa finally received a much-needed stretch of dryness and warmth as a large-scale circulation shift brought a much less active pattern across the region. Given the remarkable stretch of wetness during spring, the current dry period is a welcome break. Temperatures were unseasonably warm, generally three to six degrees above average. A majority of the state also experienced rainfall departures between 0.50 to 1.00 inch below average.

Sunday (2nd) afternoon and evening remained mostly sunny and slightly cooler than average with highs in the low to mid-70s. A fast-moving wave of showers and thunderstorms entered western Iowa in the early morning hours of Monday (3rd). The system moved through southern Iowa for most of the day until it dissipated Monday evening. Rain totals were highest in southwestern and eastern Iowa with lighter totals in between. Randolph (Fremont County) reported 1.55 inches, while across the state in Dubuque (Dubuque County) 1.67 inches was reported, 1.36 inches above average. The swath of Iowa in between generally saw totals from 0.10 to 0.50 inches.

Tuesday (4th) was active across northeastern Iowa as showers and thunderstorms moved through from late evening through early Wednesday (5th) morning. Highs were in the low to mid-80s, on average four to six degrees above normal, helping fuel the storms. Rain totals were highest in the northeast quadrant with four stations reporting above an inch; Cascade (Dubuque County) reported 1.77 inches. Remaining totals across this region ranged from 0.25 to 0.75 inches with the average total around 0.44 inches.

A line of storms re-fired in east-central Iowa on Wednesday afternoon with moderate rainfall. Rain totals varied from 0.20 inches in Newton (Jasper County) to 0.87 inches in Garwin (Tama County). The line dissipated as it moved through southeastern Iowa with a strong thunderstorm popping up in Van Buren County; severe hail was reported in Keosauqua. The end of the week was less active with warmer than average conditions. Northwestern Iowa reported highs near 90 degrees on Thursday (6th). Statewide temperatures averaged 86 degrees, eight degrees above average. Overnight lows were above average as well.

Friday (7th) was sunny and unseasonably warm with low humidity. High temperatures reached the mid to upper 80s, four to six degrees above average. Overnight lows into Saturday (8th) remained warmer than average, dipping down into the mid-60s. Conditions through the day on Saturday remained pleasant with continued sunny and dry conditions in Iowa. Temperatures were near to above average with the high 80s in the north and low to mid-80s across southern Iowa. A weak cold front brought isolated measurable rain to extreme northwest Iowa late Saturday into Sunday (9th) morning, with accumulations ranging from 0.02 inches in Sioux City (Woodbury County) to 0.39 inches in Akron (Plymouth County) at 7:00 am.

Weekly rainfall totals ranged from no measurable accumulations at a handful of stations to 2.17 inches in Fulton (Jackson County). The statewide weekly average rainfall was 0.52 inches, just under half of the expected 1.18 inches. Temperatures averaged 71.8 degrees, 4.3 degrees above normal. The week’s high temperature of 91 degrees was observed at Hawarden and Sioux Center (Sioux County), as well as Rock Rapids (Lyon County) on the 6th; this reading was on average 13 degrees above normal. Cresco (Howard County) reported the week’s low temperature of 44 degrees on the 3rd, seven degrees below average.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

June 3, 2019

Iowa farmers continue to battle wet field conditions as another week of heavy rainfall limited farmers to only 1.3 days suitable for fieldwork statewide during the week ending June 2, 2019, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. The lower third of Iowa had 0.5 days suitable for fieldwork or less for the second week in a row. Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 0 percent short, 50 percent adequate and 50 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 0 percent short, 49 percent adequate and 51 percent surplus. Eighty percent of the expected corn crop has been planted, nearly 3 weeks behind the 5-year average. This is the smallest amount of corn planted by June 2 since 1982 when 76 percent of the expected crop had been planted. There were comments that some of these expected corn acres may go to soybeans or prevented planting. Fifty-eight percent of the crop has emerged, 12 days behind last year and 13 days behind average. Forty-one percent of the expected soybean crop has been planted, 18 days behind last year and average. This is the smallest percent of soybeans planted by June 2 since 1993 when just 39 percent of the expected crop had been planted. Seventeen percent of the crop has emerged, 2 weeks behind last year and 13 days behind average. Ninety-three percent of the expected oat crop has emerged, 8 days behind last year and 10 days behind average. Six percent of the crop has headed, 8 days behind average. Only 4 percent of the State’s first cutting of alfalfa hay has been completed, over two weeks behind average. Hay condition rated 60 percent good to excellent. Pasture condition decreased slightly to 62 percent good to excellent. Feedlots remain muddy.

Iowa Preliminary Weather Summary

Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Iowa continued to experience wetter than normal conditions as a persistent weather pattern locked in over the Midwest brought multiple low-pressure systems through the state. Temperatures were near normal across a majority of Iowa with cooler conditions in northwestern Iowa and slightly warmer conditions in parts of eastern Iowa.
After an unseasonably warm and sunny afternoon, thunderstorms moved through Iowa late Sunday (26th) night through Memorial Day (27th). Isolated severe thunderstorms moved through west-central Iowa early in the day with reports of straight-line wind damage to trees from Page County to Polk County; 70 mph wind gusts were reported in Menlo (Guthrie County). Around midafternoon, an isolated severe storm in northeastern Iowa produced multiple reports of tornadoes from Charles City (Floyd County) into Howard County. Weak tornadoes with minor structural damage were also reported across Van Buren, Des Moines, and Lee Counties, associated with a fast moving severe storm in the evening hours.
Tuesday (28th) was another active day with additional rounds of thunderstorms moving through the state. There were also severe hail and high wind reports across southern Iowa; wind damage was reported to multiple structures at an Iowa State University research farm in Lucas County. Two-day rain totals were largest across the state’s southern third where multiple stations reported above average totals between two to four inches. Over 40 stations reported totals above two inches with Salem (Henry County) observing 4.70 inches. Rainfall totals across the rest of Iowa were generally between 0.50-1.00 inch.
A low pressure system located in eastern Nebraska slowly propagated through Iowa on Wednesday (29th), spinning up weak landspout tornadoes in nine counties. Structural and tree damage was reported along with one injury in Poweshiek County. Strong thunderstorms formed later in the day across eastern Iowa, producing locally heavy downpours. Parkersburg (Butler County) reported 1.35 inches, 1.19 inches above average. The low finally exited on Thursday (30th), producing very isolated and slow-moving storms in western Iowa. Rainfall ranged from 0.10 inch in Rockwell City (Calhoun County) to 0.53 inch in Creston (Union County).
Friday (31st) was the week’s warmest day, especially in north-central Iowa, where highs were 10-12 degrees above average. Spotty thundershowers developed during the evening hours though they quickly dissipated. Another line of showers and thunderstorms sped through Iowa in the early morning hours on Saturday (1st). Rainfall totals were generally light with Atlantic (Cass County) reporting 0.42 inch. The rest of Saturday was relatively quiet statewide with highs reaching into the low to mid-70s across the state’s northern half and into the low 80s across southern Iowa, a few degrees warmer than average. Overnight lows into Sunday (2nd) were generally in the mid to upper 50s. These readings were cooler than average, especially under clear skies.
Weekly rainfall totals ranged from 0.51 inch in Webster City (Hamilton County) to 5.14 inches in Keosauqua (Van Buren County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 2.11 inches, while the normal is 1.08 inches. Temperatures averaged 64.8 degrees, 0.10 degree below normal. The week’s high temperature of 89 degrees was observed at Hampton (Franklin County), Iowa Falls (Hardin County), and Waterloo (Black Hawk County) on the 31st, on average 13 degrees above normal. Cresco (Howard County) reported the week’s low temperature of 43 degrees on the 2nd, eight degrees below average.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

May 28, 2019

Heavy rainfall and damaging storms kept Iowa farmers from making much planting progress with only 1.0 day suitable for fieldwork statewide during the week ending May 26, 2019, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. South central and southeast Iowa farmers reported less than a half day suitable for fieldwork this past week with little to no planting progress. Several comments were received about Iowa farmers investigating prevented planting options. Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 0 percent short, 41 percent adequate and 59 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 1 percent short, 44 percent adequate and 55 percent surplus. Only 6 percent of the expected corn crop was planted this past week. Iowa corn growers now have 76 percent of the expected crop planted, 10 days behind last year and 2 weeks behind the 5-year average. This is the smallest amount of corn planted by May 26 since 1995 when 75 percent of the expected crop had been planted. Forty-two percent of the crop has emerged, 9 days behind last year and 10 days behind average. Less than one-third of the expected soybean crop has been planted, two weeks behind last year and average. This is the smallest percent of soybeans planted by May 26 since 1993 when just 23 percent of the expected crop had been planted. Eight percent of the crop has emerged, 12 days behind last year and 8 days behind average. Eighty-seven percent of the expected oat crop has emerged, 8 days behind average. There were reports that some alfalfa hay is ready to be cut, but wet conditions prevented Iowa farmers from entering the fields. Hay condition decreased slightly to 60 percent good to excellent. Pasture condition improved to 64 percent good to excellent. Continued rains made feedlots muddy and stressed cattle.

Iowa Preliminary Weather Summary

Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

May’s last full week saw an active weather pattern across Iowa that brought continued unseasonable wetness and severe weather. Measurable rainfall was observed every day of the reporting period along with six days of at least one severe weather report. Average temperatures were unseasonably cool with northwestern Iowa experiencing the coolest conditions. Highs on Monday (20th) were well below average as cloudy conditions blanketed Iowa. Overnight lows Sunday (19th) into Monday dipped into the upper 30s northeast to upper 40s southeast. Highs only reached the mid-50s with the warmest temperatures in northern and eastern Iowa, though 10-20 degrees below average. Rain moved across Iowa’s southern third ahead of a strong low pressure that brought unseasonably wet conditions across the state Tuesday (21st). The low spun out of Missouri and brought multiple waves of moderate to heavy rainfall across Iowa. All stations reported measurable rain with the highest totals across southern Iowa; accumulations ranged from 0.22 inches in Muscatine (Muscatine County) to 1.64 inches in Algona (Kossuth County). Severe thunderstorms moved into southwestern Iowa late in the night into early Wednesday (22nd) morning. An EF-2 rated tornado touched down in Adair (Adair County) with estimated wind speeds up to 130 mph. Extensive structural damage was reported at a house and nearby farm buildings. Unfortunately, one fatality and one injury were reported; this was the first tornado-related death in Iowa since April 27th, 2014. An EF-1 rated tornado also touched down in Anita (Cass County) causing barn damage. As the system exited Iowa, light rain showers formed in northwestern Iowa leaving average totals of around a tenth of an inch. The rest of the day was warm and windy under sunny skies. Brisk southwest winds between 25- 35 mph boosted highs near 80 degrees in southeastern Iowa; temperatures were in the mid-60s to low 70s across the rest of Iowa. Isolated severe thunderstorms raced through Lee County during the late evening, leaving behind 1-inch hail reports and heavy rainfall. Thursday (23rd) was dry for most of the day with high pressure to the west of Iowa. A potent low-pressure system moved into the state in the evening, bringing widespread showers and thunderstorms that remained into Friday (24th) morning. Warm daytime highs helped fuel thunderstorms in eastern Iowa during the late afternoon and evening hours. An EF-1 rated tornado briefly touched down in southwest Johnson County causing minor structural damage. Thunderstorms, some severe, formed over Iowa’s southern half during the evening and through the night on Saturday (25th). Rainfall persisted into Sunday (26th) with totals at 7:00 am averaging 0.25 inch; Keokuk reported 2.21 inches, 1.93 inches above average. Weekend temperatures were above average by up to four to eight degrees across most of Iowa. Weekly rainfall totals ranged from 1.48 inches in Cedar Rapids (Linn County) to 5.42 inches in Red Oak (Montgomery County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 2.60 inches, over double the normal of 1.05 inches. Temperatures averaged 58.9 degrees, 4.0 degrees below normal. The week’s high temperature of 87 degrees was observed at Keokuk Lock and Dam (Lee County) on the 24th, 11 degrees warmer than average. Sibley (Osceola County) reported the week’s low temperature of 33 degrees on the 21st, 14 degrees below average.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week Ending May 19

Iowa farmers worked hard to make planting progress with drier conditions during the early part of the week ending May 19, 2019, according to the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. However, heavy rain fell late in the week which limited farmers to 2.7 days suitable for fieldwork statewide.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 0 percent short, 59 percent adequate and 41 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 1 percent short, 58 percent adequate and 41 percent surplus.

Iowa corn growers have 70 percent of the expected crop planted, 5 days behind last year and 9 days behind the 5-year average. This is the smallest percent of corn planted by May 19 since 1995 when just 53 percent of the expected crop had been planted. Even with limited days suitable for fieldwork, farmers in the northern districts and east central Iowa managed to plant at least a quarter of their expected corn crop this past week. Northeast Iowa planted the highest percentage of corn as they planted 43 percent of their expected crop. Twenty percent of the crop has emerged, over a week behind last year and average. Twenty-seven percent of the expected soybean crop has been planted, 8 days behind last year and 9 days behind average. Three percent of the crop has emerged, 6 days behind average. Nearly all the expected oat crop has been planted with 76 percent emerged, 2 days behind last year and 1 week behind average. There were scattered reports for the first cutting of alfalfa hay. Hay condition rated 62 percent good to excellent. Pasture condition improved slightly to 63 percent good to excellent. Warmer temperatures early in the week helped pastures grow, allowing cattle farmers to move more cattle out to graze.

Iowa Preliminary Weather Summary

Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

 Wetter than average conditions continued across much of Iowa with the state’s western extent experiencing drier than normal conditions. Temperatures across the western half of Iowa were slightly warmer than average while the rest of the state was near or slightly below normal. Cooler conditions in eastern Iowa were partially attributed to increased cloud cover and rainfall.

Rain showers associated with a weak low-pressure system dissipated late in the day on Sunday (12th). Daytime highs were in the low to mid-50s; highs in southeastern Iowa were generally 15 to 20 degrees cooler than average. Burlington (Des Moines County) observed a daytime high of 47 degrees, 25 degrees below average. Rainfall was generally confined to southern Iowa where totals reported at 7:00 am on Monday (13th) ranged from 0.05 inch in Keokuk (Lee County) to 0.38 inch in Bedford (Taylor County). Daytime temperatures were boosted into the mid-60s ahead of an expected warming trend across Iowa. A fast-moving complex of showers and thunderstorms moved from northwestern Iowa though southeastern Iowa on Tuesday (14th) leaving behind above average totals in central and southeastern Iowa, ranging from 0.20 to 0.40 inch above climatological expectation. Boone (Boone County) reported 0.63 inch of rain, 0.50 inch above normal. Wednesday (15th) saw morning fog burn off into sunny and warm conditions. Highs reached into the upper 70s and low 80s in western Iowa and remained unseasonably warm overnight. Stations in Cass, Harrison, and Montgomery counties observed 82 degrees, nine degrees above average.

Thursday (16th) began a multi-day stretch of thunderstorms and locally heavy rainfall across Iowa. A warm and unstable atmosphere over central Iowa supported severe storms Thursday night. There were multiple reports of large hail, the largest of which was 1.75 inches in Tama County. Severe straight-line winds were also reported from Dallas to Clinton counties. Overall, this was the most widespread severe weather event so far in 2019, with 11 counties affected. Widespread thunderstorm activity occurred Friday (17th) and Saturday (18th) and was associated with a strong low-pressure system. Northern and eastern Iowa received multiple waves of showers and thunderstorms with New Hampton (Chickasaw County) observing the highest 24-hour total of 4.25 inches on the 18th, 4.09 inches above average. Three-day rain totals reported at 7:00 am on Sunday (19th) were above one inch at 48 stations. Temperatures remained mild over the weekend with highs 8 to 12 degrees above average in southern Iowa.

Weekly rainfall totals ranged from 0.11 inch in Mapleton (Monona County) to 4.95 inches in Elma (Howard County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 1.77 inches, 0.72 inches above average. Temperatures also averaged 61.9 degrees, slightly above the climatological normal of 61.5 degrees. The week’s high temperature of 94 degrees was observed at Clarinda (Page County) on the 16th, 21 degrees warmer than average. Chariton (Lucas County) reported the week’s low temperature of 30 degrees on the 13th, 16 degrees below average.

NAIG FINAL 2018 IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, November 26, 2018

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig has commented on the final Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service for the 2018 growing season.
“Iowa farmers have dealt with numerous challenges throughout the growing season, including flooding in Northwest Iowa and serious drought in the southeast part of the state,” Naig said. “The record precipitation we have received this fall has resulted in one of the slowest harvests on record. Even with those challenges, many parts of our state reported record or near record yields. We are fortunate to have tremendous farmers who do an amazing job raising the crops and livestock that help keep us fed and fueled.” Since this is the final weekly report for 2018, the reports are scheduled to resume April 1, 2019.

The weekly report is available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www. IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site at www.nass.usda.gov/ia.
The report summary follows here:

Iowa farmers had 4.4 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending November 25, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Activities for the week included harvesting corn and soybeans, baling stalks, applying manure, and moving grain. Early in the week farmers were doing fall tillage, tile repair, and anhydrous application, but those activities halted as declining temperatures, rain and snow arrived.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 1 percent short, 81 percent adequate and 18 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 2 percent short, 79 percent adequate and 19 percent surplus.

Ninety-six percent of the state’s corn for grain crop has been harvested, 4 days behind the five-year average. Farmers in Northwest, North Central, and Central Iowa have harvested 98 percent of their corn for grain while farmers in the southwest have 13 percent of their corn for grain remaining to be harvested. The moisture content of field corn being harvested averaged 16 percent. Soybean harvest was 98 percent complete, 9 days behind last year and 12 days behind the average.

Feedlots and pastures were messy with warming temperatures followed by rain and snow late in the week. Livestock conditions varied by area with some reports of no issues while others had trouble getting water, feed, and bedding to livestock.

The preliminary Iowa weather summary, Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist with the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship, reported that Thanksgiving week was cooler than average for most of Iowa with some locations experiencing seasonal temperatures. Northeastern Iowa was up to six degrees below normal while parts of extreme western Iowa were a few degrees above average. Most of Iowa also experienced unseasonably dry conditions; widespread measurable precipitation did not fall until after Thanksgiving.

Monday, November 19, was cold across much of Iowa with average highs up to 20 degrees below average. Winds gradually shifted to a southerly direction on Tuesday the 20th and Wednesday the 21st, warming temperatures into the upper 40s and low 50s in the south; northern Iowa observed low to mid-30s. Thanksgiving Day (22nd) started with foggy conditions across much of Iowa. Sunny conditions then prevailed across the state, with highs reaching into the mid-50s in Southwestern Iowa.

Rain showers moved into Iowa early Friday the 23rd, bringing measurable accumulations statewide. Higher amounts were reported across eastern Iowa with Muscatine (Muscatine County) observing 0.35 inches, 0.27 inches above average. Saturday the 24th was pleasant, with highs reaching into the middle 50s. After partly sunny conditions for much of the day, increasing clouds signaled the next major weather system.
A strong low pressure moved into Iowa late Saturday into Sunday (25th) with a wintery mix and snow. The system brought winds up to 40 mph and moderate to heavy snowfall across southern Iowa as of the end of the reporting period at 7 a.m.; blizzard conditions and snow accumulations of up to 17 inches were reported in Iowa’s southeastern quadrant after the observation cut-off.

Sioux City (Woodbury County) observed the week’s high of 62 degrees on the 22nd, 20 degrees above average. Fayette (Fayette County) and Tripoli (Bremer County) reported a low of -3 degrees on the 19th, 27 degrees below average. Davenport (Scott County) reported the highest rainfall total of the week at 1.83 inches.

 

NAIG COMMENTS ON IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, November 19, 2018

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Slow but steady harvest progress continues as farmers deal with challenging conditions to bring in their crops including rain, snow and freezing temperatures. Farmers have been able to harvest 91 percent of corn and 97 percent of soybeans, both of which are four days behind average,” Naig said.

The weekly report is also available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site atwww.nass.usda.gov/ia. The report summary follows here: 

CROP REPORT

Iowa farmers had a rather cold 4.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending November 18, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Activities for the week included harvesting corn and soybeans, baling stalks, applying anhydrous and manure, moving grain, repairing tile, and fall tillage in areas where the ground was not too frozen.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 1 percent short, 81 percent adequate and 18 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 2 percent short, 78 percent adequate and 20 percent surplus.

Ninety-one percent of the State’s corn for grain crop has been harvested, 4 days behind the five-year average. Farmers in northwest and north central Iowa have harvested 96 percent of their corn for grain while farmers in the southwest have 22 percent of their corn for grain remaining to be harvested. Moisture content of field corn being harvested averaged 16 percent. Soybean harvest was 97 percent complete, 5 days behind last year and 4 days behind the average.

Feedlots and pastures have begun freezing with some areas reporting frost down to 3 inches. The adjustment to extremely cold temperatures and snow-covered pastures caused livestock some minor stress.

IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY

By Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Iowa experienced an unseasonably cold and dry week during the reporting period. Average temperatures were coldest in eastern Iowa, up to 12 degrees below normal. The state experienced both rain and snow, though some locations in western Iowa reported no measurable accumulations; statewide average precipitation was 0.17 inches, well below the weekly normal of 0.49 inches. Light accumulating snow was reported in Keokuk (Lee County) on Monday (12th) along with colder than normal temperatures statewide. Trace amounts were also reported in central Iowa. A strong high pressure system over the Great Plains dominated the weather pattern for much of mid-week. Tuesday (13th) and Wednesday (14th) were dry statewide with average highs reaching the upper 40s across parts of northwestern Iowa. A southerly wind helped temperatures warm into the upper 40s to middle 50s on Thursday (15th). Northwestern Iowa had daytime highs 10 degrees above average. Snow moved into Iowa during the afternoon on Friday (16th) and lingered across the state into Saturday (17th). Snowfall totals were over three inches in Iowa’s northeastern third. St. Ansgar (Mitchell County) observed 3.8 inches of snow. Snow showers reformed across Iowa’s southern half later in the day on Saturday before moving out early Sunday (18th). Accumulations ranged from a dusting to over six inches; Beaconsfield (Ringgold County) reported 6.5 inches. Bitter cold temperatures gripped northern Iowa to end the week. Some locations had overnight lows below zero Saturday night into Sunday. Mason City (Marshall County) reported a low of -6 degrees, breaking the record of -4 degrees set in 1894. Sioux City Airport (Woodbury County) reported the week’s high temperature of 60 degrees on the 15th, 13 degrees above normal. An overnight low of -6 degrees was reported at New Hampton (Chickasaw County) on the 18th, 28 degrees below normal.

NAIG COMMENTS ON IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, November 13, 2018

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Farmers have now harvested 83 percent of corn and 94 percent of soybeans, which is 3 and 4 days behind average, respectively. It has been a long and challenging harvest season for Iowa farmers to harvest crops and complete other fall field work,” Naig said. “The deadline to seed cereal rye cover crops has been extended to Dec. 1 statewide, so there is still time for farmers to get cover crops planted and complete other conservation work this fall.”

The weekly report is also available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site atwww.nass.usda.gov/ia. The report summary follows here:

CROP REPORT

As temperatures dipped below normal across much of the State, Iowa farmers managed to find 4.0 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending November 11, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Activities for the week included harvesting corn and soybeans, baling stalks, applying anhydrous and manure, repairing tile, and fall tillage in areas where the ground was not too frozen.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 1 percent short, 80 percent adequate and 19 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 2 percent short, 77 percent adequate and 21 percent surplus.

Eighty-three percent of the State’s corn for grain crop has been harvested, 3 days behind the five-year average. Farmers in north central Iowa have harvested 91 percent of their corn for grain while farmers in the southwest have 36 percent of their corn for grain remaining to be harvested. Moisture content of field corn being harvested averaged 16 percent. Soybean harvest was 94 percent complete, 3 days behind last year and 4 days behind the average.

Feedlots and pastures remain excessively wet and frozen in some areas. Livestock were stressed by extremely cold weekend temperatures.

IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY

By Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Iowa experienced an unseasonably cold week with the statewide average temperature almost 10 degrees below normal. Portions of northern and eastern Iowa observed wetter than normal conditions with southern Iowa generally drier than expected. The statewide average precipitation was 0.49 inches, just below the week’s normal of 0.51 inches. A low pressure system tracked northeast through Iowa on Monday (5th) bringing statewide measurable rainfall. Many stations across northern Iowa received accumulations between 0.25 and 0.50 inches; Fort Dodge (Webster County) reported a 24-hour measurement of 0.74 inches. Daytime highs were generally in the mid-40s with cloud cover keeping overnight lows in the upper 30s and 40s. Showers lingered across northeastern Iowa into Tuesday (7th); rainfall totals topped out at 0.10 inches. Wednesday was relatively quiet with cloudy skies and highs in the mid-30s. Measurable snow fell across portions of Iowa late Thursday (8th) into Friday (9th). Accumulations averaged between 1 to 2 inches; Donnellson (Lee County) observed 2.4 inches. High temperatures plunged into the upper teens in the northwest to upper 20s in the southeast. Dubuque (Dubuque County) observed a 28 degree high, breaking the record cold high of 32 degrees set in 1973. Overnight lows fell into the single digits, averaging 16 to 20 degrees below normal, breaking records in some locations; Lamoni (Decatur County) and Ottumwa (Wapello County) observed lows of nine degrees, breaking two 1926 records of 11 and 15 degrees, respectively. Saturday (10th) was chilly with highs in the mid to upper 20s. Overnight lows Sunday (11th) again fell into the single digits. Measurable precipitation was not reported over the weekend. Fort Madison (Davis County) observed the week’s high of 51 degrees on the 5th, 4.7 degrees below average. Estherville (Emmet County) reported the week’s low of two degrees on the 10th, 24 degrees below normal.

 

NAIG COMMENTS ON IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, November 5, 2018

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Farmers were again able to make good progress last week and now 72 percent of corn and 88 percent of soybeans have been harvested. Corn harvest is now just one day behind average, but soybeans are still six days behind the five-year average. Unfortunately, significant rainfall has returned to much of the state and likely stalled harvest for several days,” Naig said. “This has been a very challenging fall not just to harvest crops, but also complete other activities such as installing conservation practices, seeding cover crops and baling stalks.”

The weekly report is also available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site atwww.nass.usda.gov/ia. The report summary follows here:

CROP REPORT

Iowa farmers had another good week for harvesting with 5.3 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending November 4, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Activities for the week included harvesting corn and soybeans, baling stalks, anhydrous and manure application, fall tillage, tile repair, and planting cover crops.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 1 percent short, 71 percent adequate and 28 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 2 percent short, 71 percent adequate and 27 percent surplus.

Seventy-two percent of the State’s corn for grain crop has been harvested, 3 days ahead of last year but 1 day behind the five-year average. Farmers in central Iowa have harvested 80 percent of their corn for grain while farmers in the southwest have 45 percent of their corn for grain remaining to be harvested. Moisture content of field corn being harvested averaged 17 percent. Soybean harvest was 88 percent complete, 2 days behind last year and 6 days behind the average.

Recent rains have left some feedlot cattle stressed with standing water and muddy conditions, while others reported livestock conditions as very good.

IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY

By Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Much of Iowa had slightly warmer than average temperatures from the end of October into early November; temperatures were around two degrees warmer than normal. The reporting period saw above average rainfall mainly in eastern Iowa with many locations between 0.40-0.80 inches above normal. Light rain showers moved across eastern Iowa on Monday (29th) with only a handful of stations reporting measurable rainfall; Cedar Rapids (Linn County) reported 0.11 inches. Widespread and heavier rain fell on Tuesday (30th) as a cold front swept across Iowa. Afternoon thunderstorms quickly formed and moved into Illinois. Maquoketa (Jackson County) observed 1.67 inches, 1.58 inches above normal. Keokuk (Lee County) reported 0.50 inches as the front slowly moved southeast. Wednesday (31st) was a quiet day with high pressure controlling the pattern. Conditions were partly to mostly sunny with highs in the upper 50s. A low pressure system gradually moved into northwest Iowa late Thursday (1st) into Friday (2nd) bringing rain showers to portions of western Iowa. Showers redeveloped during late afternoon in southeastern Iowa. A second low pressure system slowly moved through the region Saturday (3rd) into Sunday (4th), bringing widespread, measurable rainfall to much of Iowa. Total accumulations over this period ranged from a few tenths of an inch to well over an inch; Anamosa (Jones County) reported 1.48 inches. Cloud cover kept daytime highs cooler than normal, ranging from the upper 40s to lower 50s and overnight lows warmer than average. Bloomfield (Davis County) reported the week’s high of 71 degrees on the 29th, 12 degrees above average. The week’s coldest overnight low of 25 degrees was recorded in multiple counties in northwestern Iowa on the 1st, on average six degrees cooler than normal.

 

NAIG COMMENTS ON IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, October 29, 2018

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“We are now 49 percent of corn and 71 percent of beans harvested, which puts corn 3 days behind and soybeans 7 days behind the five-year average. The good weather allowed 20 percent of corn and 34 percent of soybeans to be harvested last week,” Naig said. “We need another couple good weeks to allow farmers to continue to try and catch up after a very challenging start to harvest.”

The Iowa Farm Bureau Federation and Decision Innovation Solutions have analyzed Iowa Crop Progress and Condition Reports going back to 1990 looking at the largest week of corn and soybean harvest each year. Additional information about their analysis can be found here.

The weekly report is also available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site atwww.nass.usda.gov/ia. The report summary follows here:

CROP REPORT

Iowa farmers had a good week for harvesting with 5.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending October 28, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Taking advantage of the dry conditions, activities for the week included harvesting corn and soybeans, baling stalks, anhydrous and manure application, fall tillage, and planting cover crops.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 0 percent short, 79 percent adequate and 21 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 1 percent short, 73 percent adequate and 26 percent surplus.

Forty-nine percent of the State’s corn for grain crop has been harvested, 3 days ahead of last year but 3 days behind the five-year average. Farmers in southeast Iowa have harvested 65 percent of their corn for grain while farmers in the northeast and southwest are yet to cross the 40 percent mark on their corn for grain harvest. Moisture content of field corn being harvested averaged 18 percent. Corn condition rated 69 percent good to excellent. Soybean harvest was 71 percent complete, a week behind the average. This is the smallest percentage of the soybean crop harvested by October 28 since 2009.

Pasture conditions rated 52 percent good to excellent. Feedlots are drying to more favorable condition.

IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY

By Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Unseasonably cool and dry conditions continued across Iowa during October’s last full week. Temperatures were generally near normal in western Iowa and up to four degrees cooler than normal in eastern Iowa. Statewide precipitation deficits were largest in southeastern Iowa. Average rainfall was around 0.12 inch; the normal for the week is 0.56 inch. A warm Monday (22nd) began the week with highs averaging between the mid-60 and lower 70s. A cold front dropped through Iowa on Tuesday (23rd) bringing cooler temperatures and pleasant conditions. Highs were generally in the 50s with overnight lows dropping into the upper 20s and lower 30s. Spotty rain showers moved into extreme western Iowa late Wednesday (24th) with measurable rainfall between 0.10 and 0.25 inch. Light rain lingered into Thursday (25 th) with highest two-day totals confined to Iowa’s western third ranging between 0.05 and 0.50 inch. Friday (26th) into Saturday (27th) was generally dry, though a weak warm front ahead of a surface low over Minnesota produced isolated showers in eastern Iowa. Highs were in the upper 60s with cloud cover keeping temperatures cooler in the northeast. As the low propagated east, a cold front moved through early Sunday (28th) bringing light rainfall to the northeastern two-thirds of Iowa. Behind the front clear to mostly sunny conditions prevailed with very gusty winds across Iowa’s eastern half. Under clear skies, overnight lows dropped into the upper 20s. The week’s high temperature of 73 degrees was reported in De Soto (Harrison County) on the 26 th , around 13 degrees above average. Elkader (Clayton County) and Stanley (Buchannan County) observed the week’s overnight low temperature of 19 degrees on the 22 nd , 16 degrees below normal. The highest weekly total rainfall accumulation of 0.62 inch was observed in Shenandoah (Page County).

NAIG COMMENTS ON IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, October 22, 2018

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Many farmers were able to get back into their fields this past week, but we still remain well behind the five-year average. The 29 percent of corn harvested is 4 days behind average and the 37 percent of beans harvested puts us 12 days behind,” Naig said. “Our farmers can make tremendous progress in a week if conditions allow. Farmers harvested 65 percent of soybeans in a single week back in 2013 and 30 percent of corn in a week in both 1993 and 2013. So, hopefully the drier weather stays in place and farmers can start to catch up.”

The Iowa Farm Bureau Federation and Decision Innovation Solutions have analyzed Iowa Crop Progress and Condition Reports going back to 1990 looking at the largest week of corn and soybean harvest each year. Additional information about their analysis can be found here.

The weekly report is also available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site at www.nass.usda.gov/ia. The report summary follows here:

CROP REPORT

Sunshine and a break from substantial precipitation got Iowa farmers back in the fields with 4.4 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending October 21, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Activities for the week included harvesting corn and soybeans, baling stalks and planting cover crops.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 0 percent short, 65 percent adequate and 35 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 2 percent short, 61 percent adequate and 37 percent surplus.

Twenty-nine percent of the State’s corn for grain crop has been harvested, 3 days ahead of last year but 4 days behind the five-year average. Farmers in southeast Iowa have neared the halfway point of corn for grain harvest while farmers in the northeast have not yet harvested one-fifth of their corn for grain. Moisture content of field corn being harvested was at 19 percent. Corn condition rated 68 percent good to excellent. Soybean harvest was 37 percent complete, 12 days behind the average. This is the smallest percentage of the soybean crop harvested by October 21 since 1985. Soybean condition rated 65 percent good to excellent.

Pasture conditions rated 55 percent good to excellent. Pastures have responded well to recent precipitation and cool temperatures. Cattle lots are still muddy but improving.

IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY

By Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

After an extremely wet start to October, abnormally dry conditions returned to Iowa. Statewide weekly precipitation deficits ranged from 0.20 to 0.70 inches. Northern Iowa observed the wettest conditions; Mason City (Cerro Gordo County) reported the week’s highest total accumulation of 0.61 inches. Unseasonably cool weather continued with average temperatures five to ten degrees below average. On Monday (15th) the remains of a cold front moved out of southeastern Iowa. Burlington (Des Moines County) reported 0.48 inches of rain. Tuesday (16th) through early night on Thursday (18th) was dry statewide with average highs in the middle to upper 50s in the eastern third of the state and lower to middle 60s across the rest of Iowa. Multiple locations in Iowa’s northwestern quadrant observed highs above 70 degrees on Wednesday (17th), up to 10 degrees above normal. A cold front with rain showers moved into Iowa Thursday night and lingered through late morning on Friday (19th). The heaviest rainfall occurred in northern Iowa; St. Ansgar (Mitchell County) recorded 0.50 inches. Much of Iowa’s southern two-thirds received between a trace and a tenth of an inch. Cloud cover moved out of Iowa later in the day Friday into Saturday (20th). A second cold front sped through Iowa on Saturday bringing cooler air and windy conditions statewide. Stations in eastern Iowa observed sustained winds between 20 to 30 miles per hour with gusts in the 40-50 mph range in the late afternoon. Sunday (21st) was pleasant as high pressure dominated the region. Skies were generally clear with unseasonable coolness. Red Oak (Montgomery County) and Shenandoah (Page County) reported the week’s high of 73 degrees on the 19th, nine degrees above average. Stanley (Buchanan County) observed the week’s low temperature of 18 degrees on the 21st, 17 degrees below average.

 

NAIG COMMENTS ON IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, October 15, 2018

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“The cool wet weather kept farmers mostly out of the fields and as a result they were only able to harvest 2 percent of corn and 1 percent of soybean acres. Corn harvest is now 4 days behind average and soybean harvest is 11 days behind. With just 19 percent of soybeans harvested as of Oct. 14, farmers are having the slowest bean harvest on record,” Naig said. “With dryer weather in the forecast, farmers will be putting in long hours to bring in the crop as quickly as possible when conditions allow. We again encourage everyone working on the farm or traveling on our rural roads to take the time needed to be safe during what can be a very busy and stressful time.”

The weekly report is also available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site atwww.nass.usda.gov/ia. The report summary follows here:

CROP REPORT

Rain and early snow showers limited Iowa farmers to just 0.8 day suitable for fieldwork during the week ending October 14, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Activities for the week included moving grain, monitoring field conditions and harvesting corn when weather permitted.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 0 percent short, 40 percent adequate and 60 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 1 percent very short, 2 percent short, 49 percent adequate and 48 percent surplus.

Ninety-seven percent of the corn crop was mature, 5 days ahead of the five-year average. Seventeen percent of the State’s corn for grain crop has been harvested, 4 days ahead of last year but 4 days behind average. Across the State farmers were only able to harvest 2 percent of their corn for grain crop during the week. Farmers in southeast Iowa continue to lead the way with 41 percent of their corn for grain harvested. Moisture content of field corn being harvested was at 20 percent. Corn condition rated 69 percent good to excellent. Ninety-seven percent of the soybean crop was dropping leaves, 5 days ahead of average. Nineteen percent of the soybean crop has been harvested, 11 days behind the average. This is the smallest percentage of the soybean crop harvested by October 14 since records began. Soybean condition rated 65 percent good to excellent.

Pasture conditions rated 55 percent good to excellent. Livestock conditions remain challenging after another week with significant precipitation left feedlots extremely muddy.

 

IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY

By Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

October’s second week brought up to four inches of above average precipitation to Iowa. Average temperatures were predominately cooler than expected; northwestern Iowa was 6 to 10 degrees below normal. Parts of western Iowa were near normal to warmer than average. The beginning of the reporting period was active with widespread showers and thunderstorms across Iowa on Monday (8th) as low pressure moved across the state. Knoxville (Marion County) reported a 24-hour accumulation of 4.25 inches. Over 40 stations reported rainfall above one inch. A strong cold front moved through Iowa on Tuesday (9th) with locally heavy rain. Average highs ranged from the upper 40s in the northwest to the upper 70s in the southeast. Over the two day period, severe thunderstorms produced 10 confirmed tornadoes, the strongest of which occurred Tuesday evening near Creston (Union County) with estimated winds up to 120 mph, causing structural damage. The cold front moved out of eastern Iowa early Wednesday (10th), leaving behind cloudy and unseasonably cool temperatures. Average highs varied from the 50s in the west and 60s to lower 70s ahead of the cold front. Dubuque (Dubuque County) reported 0.99 inches of rain. Light rain showers moved in on Friday (12th). Some locations in central Iowa reported snowflakes. Saturday (13th) was relatively dry with spotty showers late in the day in northwest Iowa. Sunday (14th) saw a mix of rain and snow with light accumulations on grass and elevated surfaces, especially in north-central Iowa. Weekend temperatures were below normal with highs in the upper 40s and lower 50s. Davenport (Scott County) observed the week’s high of 84 degrees on Monday, 18 degrees above normal. The week’s lowest temperature of 24 degrees was reported in Sanborn and Sheldon (O’Brien County) on the 14th, an average of 12 degrees below normal.

NAIG COMMENTS ON IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, October 9, 2018

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“This run of extremely wet weather has slowed harvest progress dramatically and as a result soybean harvest is now well behind the five-year average. We need the rains to stop and several days of dry weather so fields can dry and farmers are able to get back to harvest,” Naig said.

The weekly report is also available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site atwww.nass.usda.gov/ia. The report summary follows here:

CROP REPORT

Continued wet weather conditions allowed Iowa farmers just 1.6 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending October 7, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Activities for the week included harvesting corn and soybeans when weather permitted.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 0 percent short, 41 percent adequate and 59 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 1 percent very short, 2 percent short, 50 percent adequate and 47 percent surplus. Recent rains have boosted topsoil moisture supplies in south central and southeast Iowa to 99 percent adequate to surplus.

Ninety-five percent of the corn crop was mature, 9 days ahead of average. Fifteen percent of the State’s corn for grain has been harvested, 10 days ahead of last year. Farmers in southeast Iowa continue to lead the way with 39 percent of their corn for grain harvested. Moisture content of field corn being harvested was at 20 percent. Corn condition rated 70 percent good to excellent. Nearly all of the soybean crop was coloring with 94 percent dropping leaves, 8 days ahead of average. Eighteen percent of the soybean crop has been harvested, 5 days behind the average. Soybean condition rated 70 percent good to excellent.

The third cutting of alfalfa hay was nearly complete at 98 percent. Pasture condition improved slightly to 55 percent good to excellent. Muddy feedlot conditions have been a challenge for cattle producers.

 

IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY

By Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

The first week of October had unsettled conditions statewide with above average rainfall and generally below average temperatures. Precipitation totals were up to four inches above normal with higher accumulations in eastern Iowa. Temperatures were cooler than expected, except in the southeastern corner. Monday (1st) was a rainy day for Iowa’s northern two-thirds as a low pressure system moved into the state. Rainfall totals into Tuesday (2nd) morning were above one inch for over 40 stations with Dubuque (Dubuque County) reporting 2.31 inches, 2.21 inches above normal. Average highs ranged from the 50s in the northwest with gradual warming into the lower 70s towards the southeast. Showers and thunderstorms continued across northern parts of Iowa during the day on Wednesday (3rd). Statewide highs were in the upper 70s and low 80s. Late in the evening a cold front moved through Iowa, bringing rain to the southeast. Accumulations were under an inch with Newton (Jasper County) observing the highest total of 0.81 inches. With the cold front exiting Iowa early Thursday, highs cooled into the 50s. Multiple rounds of showers and thunderstorms moved through Iowa Friday (5th) through Sunday (7th), especially across the southern and eastern counties. Heavy rain was observed in eastern Iowa Friday evening into early Saturday (6th); Williamsburg (Iowa County) reported 3.65 inches, 3.55 inches above average. Stations from Marion to Scott counties recorded accumulations above two inches. Measurable rainfall was reported across much of Iowa on Sunday. Weekend highs ranged from the upper 40s in the north to lower 60s in the south. De Soto (Harrison County) observed the week’s warmest temperature of 93 degrees on the 2nd. Estherville (Emmet County) reported the week’s low of 30 degrees on the 4th. Statewide average precipitation was around 1.61 inches, 0.93 inches above the average of 0.68 inches.

NAIG COMMENTS ON IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, October 2, 2018

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Harvest is making steady progress despite soggy conditions across the state, with 11 percent of corn and 15 percent of soybeans harvested. The rains have helped pasture conditions, but have caused some delays getting the crop out. Many farmers are anxious for drier conditions, and hopefully weather will cooperate.”

The weekly report is also available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site atwww.nass.usda.gov/ia. The report summary follows here:

 CROP REPORT

Soggy conditions persisted for yet another week leaving Iowa farmers just 3.1 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending September 30, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Activities for the week included seeding cover crops and harvesting corn, soybeans and hay when weather permitted.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 1 percent very short, 3 percent short, 69 percent adequate and 27 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 3 percent very short, 5 percent short, 67 percent adequate and 25 percent surplus. While topsoil moisture supplies in south central Iowa have improved to above 70 percent rated adequate to surplus, subsoil moisture levels still rated 59 percent short to very short.

Eighty-eight percent of the corn crop was mature, just over a week ahead of average. Eleven percent of the State’s corn for grain crop has been harvested, 5 days ahead of average. Farmers in southeast Iowa continue to lead the way with 29 percent of their corn for grain harvested. Moisture content of field corn being harvested was at 21 percent. Corn condition rated 75 percent good to excellent.

Nearly all of the soybean crop was coloring with 88 percent dropping leaves, 9 days ahead of average. Fifteen percent of the soybean crop has been harvested, 1 day ahead of average. Soybean condition rated 74 percent good to excellent.

The third cutting of alfalfa hay was nearly complete at 98 percent. Pasture conditions improved slightly to 53 percent good to excellent. Pastures have responded well to recent rains and cooler temperatures. Muddy conditions made feedlots challenging.

IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY

By Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

The last week of September brought cooler temperatures, averaging up to four degrees below normal. Iowa’s center third had above average rainfall sandwiched between below average accumulations in northern and southern Iowa. Monday (24th) was warm and dry, with average highs between 70 and 80 degrees. The warmest conditions were found in northern Iowa, where highs were up to eight degrees above normal. A cold front moved rapidly across Iowa on Tuesday (25th), bringing locally heavy rainfall to the state’s central and eastern portions. Toledo (Tama County) reported the week’s highest accumulation of 2.18 inches. Some storms turned severe with 60 mph wind gusts and tree damage reported in Linn County. A brief tornado touchdown occurred in Mechanicsville (Cedar County) causing minor damage. Wednesday (26th) was a pleasant day across Iowa with abundant sunshine and unseasonably cool temperatures. Daytime highs averaged in the mid-60s and overnight lows dipped into the lower 40s. Another cold front moved across Iowa on Thursday (27th) bringing light rain showers to the state’s northern half. Guttenberg (Clayton County) reported 0.58 inches of rainfall. Average highs were in the mid-60s, up to eight degrees cooler than normal. Rain continued into an unseasonably cool Friday (28th) with measurable rainfall across much of Iowa. This trend continued into Saturday (29th) and Sunday (30th) with spotty showers and thunderstorms across portions of Iowa. Accumulations were generally under an inch both days. Weekend temperatures were unseasonably cool, with highs in the upper 50s to lower 60s. Holstein (Ida County) observed a high of 48 degrees on Saturday, almost 24 degrees below average; this was the week’s coolest reading. The warmest observation was in Burlington (Des Moines County) with a high of 82 degrees on Wednesday, 10 degrees above average. Statewide average rainfall was about 0.08 inches above the normal of 0.72 inches.

 

 

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