Weekly Iowa Crops and Weather Report

Weekly Iowa Crop and Weather Report

Weekly Iowa Crop and Weather Report

NAIG FINAL 2018 IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, November 26, 2018

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig has commented on the final Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service for the 2018 growing season.
“Iowa farmers have dealt with numerous challenges throughout the growing season, including flooding in Northwest Iowa and serious drought in the southeast part of the state,” Naig said. “The record precipitation we have received this fall has resulted in one of the slowest harvests on record. Even with those challenges, many parts of our state reported record or near record yields. We are fortunate to have tremendous farmers who do an amazing job raising the crops and livestock that help keep us fed and fueled.” Since this is the final weekly report for 2018, the reports are scheduled to resume April 1, 2019.

The weekly report is available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www. IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site at www.nass.usda.gov/ia.
The report summary follows here:

Iowa farmers had 4.4 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending November 25, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Activities for the week included harvesting corn and soybeans, baling stalks, applying manure, and moving grain. Early in the week farmers were doing fall tillage, tile repair, and anhydrous application, but those activities halted as declining temperatures, rain and snow arrived.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 1 percent short, 81 percent adequate and 18 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 2 percent short, 79 percent adequate and 19 percent surplus.

Ninety-six percent of the state’s corn for grain crop has been harvested, 4 days behind the five-year average. Farmers in Northwest, North Central, and Central Iowa have harvested 98 percent of their corn for grain while farmers in the southwest have 13 percent of their corn for grain remaining to be harvested. Moisture content of field corn being harvested averaged 16 percent. Soybean harvest was 98 percent complete, 9 days behind last year and 12 days behind the average.

Feedlots and pastures were messy with warming temperatures followed by rain and snow late in the week. Livestock conditions varied by area with some reports of no issues while others had trouble getting water, feed, and bedding to livestock.

The preliminary Iowa weather summary, Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist with the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship, reported that Thanksgiving week was cooler than average for most of Iowa with some locations experiencing seasonal temperatures. Northeastern Iowa was up to six degrees below normal while parts of extreme western Iowa were a few degrees above average. Most of Iowa also experienced unseasonably dry conditions; widespread measurable precipitation did not fall until after Thanksgiving.

Monday, November 19, was cold across much of Iowa with average highs up to 20 degrees below average. Winds gradually shifted to a southerly direction on Tuesday the 20th and Wednesday the 21st, warming temperatures into the upper 40s and low 50s in the south; northern Iowa observed low to mid 30s. Thanksgiving Day (22nd) started with foggy conditions across much of Iowa. Sunny conditions then prevailed across the state, with highs reaching into the mid-50s in Southwestern Iowa.

Rain showers moved into Iowa early Friday the 23rd, bringing measurable accumulations statewide. Higher amounts were reported across eastern Iowa with Muscatine (Muscatine County) observing 0.35 inches, 0.27 inches above average. Saturday the 24th was pleasant, with highs reaching into the middle 50s. After partly sunny conditions for much of the day, increasing clouds signaled the next major weather system.
A strong low pressure moved into Iowa late Saturday into Sunday (25th) with a wintery mix and snow. The system brought winds up to 40 mph and moderate to heavy snowfall across southern Iowa as of the end of the reporting period at 7 a.m.; blizzard conditions and snow accumulations of up to 17 inches were reported in Iowa’s southeastern quadrant after the observation cut-off.

Sioux City (Woodbury County) observed the week’s high of 62 degrees on the 22nd, 20 degrees above average. Fayette (Fayette County) and Tripoli (Bremer County) reported a low of -3 degrees on the 19th, 27 degrees below average. Davenport (Scott County) reported the highest rainfall total of the week at 1.83 inches.

NAIG COMMENTS ON IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, November 19, 2018

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Slow but steady harvest progress continues as farmers deal with challenging conditions to bring in their crops including rain, snow and freezing temperatures. Farmers have been able to harvest 91 percent of corn and 97 percent of soybeans, both of which are four days behind average,” Naig said.

The weekly report is also available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site atwww.nass.usda.gov/ia. The report summary follows here: 

CROP REPORT

Iowa farmers had a rather cold 4.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending November 18, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Activities for the week included harvesting corn and soybeans, baling stalks, applying anhydrous and manure, moving grain, repairing tile, and fall tillage in areas where the ground was not too frozen.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 1 percent short, 81 percent adequate and 18 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 2 percent short, 78 percent adequate and 20 percent surplus.

Ninety-one percent of the State’s corn for grain crop has been harvested, 4 days behind the five-year average. Farmers in northwest and north central Iowa have harvested 96 percent of their corn for grain while farmers in the southwest have 22 percent of their corn for grain remaining to be harvested. Moisture content of field corn being harvested averaged 16 percent. Soybean harvest was 97 percent complete, 5 days behind last year and 4 days behind the average.

Feedlots and pastures have begun freezing with some areas reporting frost down to 3 inches. The adjustment to extremely cold temperatures and snow-covered pastures caused livestock some minor stress.

IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY

By Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Iowa experienced an unseasonably cold and dry week during the reporting period. Average temperatures were coldest in eastern Iowa, up to 12 degrees below normal. The state experienced both rain and snow, though some locations in western Iowa reported no measurable accumulations; statewide average precipitation was 0.17 inches, well below the weekly normal of 0.49 inches. Light accumulating snow was reported in Keokuk (Lee County) on Monday (12th) along with colder than normal temperatures statewide. Trace amounts were also reported in central Iowa. A strong high pressure system over the Great Plains dominated the weather pattern for much of mid-week. Tuesday (13th) and Wednesday (14th) were dry statewide with average highs reaching the upper 40s across parts of northwestern Iowa. A southerly wind helped temperatures warm into the upper 40s to middle 50s on Thursday (15th). Northwestern Iowa had daytime highs 10 degrees above average. Snow moved into Iowa during the afternoon on Friday (16th) and lingered across the state into Saturday (17th). Snowfall totals were over three inches in Iowa’s northeastern third. St. Ansgar (Mitchell County) observed 3.8 inches of snow. Snow showers reformed across Iowa’s southern half later in the day on Saturday before moving out early Sunday (18th). Accumulations ranged from a dusting to over six inches; Beaconsfield (Ringgold County) reported 6.5 inches. Bitter cold temperatures gripped northern Iowa to end the week. Some locations had overnight lows below zero Saturday night into Sunday. Mason City (Marshall County) reported a low of -6 degrees, breaking the record of -4 degrees set in 1894. Sioux City Airport (Woodbury County) reported the week’s high temperature of 60 degrees on the 15th, 13 degrees above normal. An overnight low of -6 degrees was reported at New Hampton (Chickasaw County) on the 18th, 28 degrees below normal.

NAIG COMMENTS ON IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, November 13, 2018

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Farmers have now harvested 83 percent of corn and 94 percent of soybeans, which is 3 and 4 days behind average, respectively. It has been a long and challenging harvest season for Iowa farmers to harvest crops and complete other fall field work,” Naig said. “The deadline to seed cereal rye cover crops has been extended to Dec. 1 statewide, so there is still time for farmers to get cover crops planted and complete other conservation work this fall.”

The weekly report is also available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site atwww.nass.usda.gov/ia. The report summary follows here:

CROP REPORT

As temperatures dipped below normal across much of the State, Iowa farmers managed to find 4.0 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending November 11, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Activities for the week included harvesting corn and soybeans, baling stalks, applying anhydrous and manure, repairing tile, and fall tillage in areas where the ground was not too frozen.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 1 percent short, 80 percent adequate and 19 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 2 percent short, 77 percent adequate and 21 percent surplus.

Eighty-three percent of the State’s corn for grain crop has been harvested, 3 days behind the five-year average. Farmers in north central Iowa have harvested 91 percent of their corn for grain while farmers in the southwest have 36 percent of their corn for grain remaining to be harvested. Moisture content of field corn being harvested averaged 16 percent. Soybean harvest was 94 percent complete, 3 days behind last year and 4 days behind the average.

Feedlots and pastures remain excessively wet and frozen in some areas. Livestock were stressed by extremely cold weekend temperatures.

IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY

By Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Iowa experienced an unseasonably cold week with the statewide average temperature almost 10 degrees below normal. Portions of northern and eastern Iowa observed wetter than normal conditions with southern Iowa generally drier than expected. The statewide average precipitation was 0.49 inches, just below the week’s normal of 0.51 inches. A low pressure system tracked northeast through Iowa on Monday (5th) bringing statewide measurable rainfall. Many stations across northern Iowa received accumulations between 0.25 and 0.50 inches; Fort Dodge (Webster County) reported a 24-hour measurement of 0.74 inches. Daytime highs were generally in the mid-40s with cloud cover keeping overnight lows in the upper 30s and 40s. Showers lingered across northeastern Iowa into Tuesday (7th); rainfall totals topped out at 0.10 inches. Wednesday was relatively quiet with cloudy skies and highs in the mid-30s. Measurable snow fell across portions of Iowa late Thursday (8th) into Friday (9th). Accumulations averaged between 1 to 2 inches; Donnellson (Lee County) observed 2.4 inches. High temperatures plunged into the upper teens in the northwest to upper 20s in the southeast. Dubuque (Dubuque County) observed a 28 degree high, breaking the record cold high of 32 degrees set in 1973. Overnight lows fell into the single digits, averaging 16 to 20 degrees below normal, breaking records in some locations; Lamoni (Decatur County) and Ottumwa (Wapello County) observed lows of nine degrees, breaking two 1926 records of 11 and 15 degrees, respectively. Saturday (10th) was chilly with highs in the mid to upper 20s. Overnight lows Sunday (11th) again fell into the single digits. Measurable precipitation was not reported over the weekend. Fort Madison (Davis County) observed the week’s high of 51 degrees on the 5th, 4.7 degrees below average. Estherville (Emmet County) reported the week’s low of two degrees on the 10th, 24 degrees below normal.

 

NAIG COMMENTS ON IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, November 5, 2018

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Farmers were again able to make good progress last week and now 72 percent of corn and 88 percent of soybeans have been harvested. Corn harvest is now just one day behind average, but soybeans are still six days behind the five-year average. Unfortunately, significant rainfall has returned to much of the state and likely stalled harvest for several days,” Naig said. “This has been a very challenging fall not just to harvest crops, but also complete other activities such as installing conservation practices, seeding cover crops and baling stalks.”

The weekly report is also available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site atwww.nass.usda.gov/ia. The report summary follows here:

CROP REPORT

Iowa farmers had another good week for harvesting with 5.3 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending November 4, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Activities for the week included harvesting corn and soybeans, baling stalks, anhydrous and manure application, fall tillage, tile repair, and planting cover crops.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 1 percent short, 71 percent adequate and 28 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 2 percent short, 71 percent adequate and 27 percent surplus.

Seventy-two percent of the State’s corn for grain crop has been harvested, 3 days ahead of last year but 1 day behind the five-year average. Farmers in central Iowa have harvested 80 percent of their corn for grain while farmers in the southwest have 45 percent of their corn for grain remaining to be harvested. Moisture content of field corn being harvested averaged 17 percent. Soybean harvest was 88 percent complete, 2 days behind last year and 6 days behind the average.

Recent rains have left some feedlot cattle stressed with standing water and muddy conditions, while others reported livestock conditions as very good.

IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY

By Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Much of Iowa had slightly warmer than average temperatures from the end of October into early November; temperatures were around two degrees warmer than normal. The reporting period saw above average rainfall mainly in eastern Iowa with many locations between 0.40-0.80 inches above normal. Light rain showers moved across eastern Iowa on Monday (29th) with only a handful of stations reporting measurable rainfall; Cedar Rapids (Linn County) reported 0.11 inches. Widespread and heavier rain fell on Tuesday (30th) as a cold front swept across Iowa. Afternoon thunderstorms quickly formed and moved into Illinois. Maquoketa (Jackson County) observed 1.67 inches, 1.58 inches above normal. Keokuk (Lee County) reported 0.50 inches as the front slowly moved southeast. Wednesday (31st) was a quiet day with high pressure controlling the pattern. Conditions were partly to mostly sunny with highs in the upper 50s. A low pressure system gradually moved into northwest Iowa late Thursday (1st) into Friday (2nd) bringing rain showers to portions of western Iowa. Showers redeveloped during late afternoon in southeastern Iowa. A second low pressure system slowly moved through the region Saturday (3rd) into Sunday (4th), bringing widespread, measurable rainfall to much of Iowa. Total accumulations over this period ranged from a few tenths of an inch to well over an inch; Anamosa (Jones County) reported 1.48 inches. Cloud cover kept daytime highs cooler than normal, ranging from the upper 40s to lower 50s and overnight lows warmer than average. Bloomfield (Davis County) reported the week’s high of 71 degrees on the 29th, 12 degrees above average. The week’s coldest overnight low of 25 degrees was recorded in multiple counties in northwestern Iowa on the 1st, on average six degrees cooler than normal.

 

NAIG COMMENTS ON IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, October 29, 2018

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“We are now 49 percent of corn and 71 percent of beans harvested, which puts corn 3 days behind and soybeans 7 days behind the five-year average. The good weather allowed 20 percent of corn and 34 percent of soybeans to be harvested last week,” Naig said. “We need another couple good weeks to allow farmers to continue to try and catch up after a very challenging start to harvest.”

The Iowa Farm Bureau Federation and Decision Innovation Solutions have analyzed Iowa Crop Progress and Condition Reports going back to 1990 looking at the largest week of corn and soybean harvest each year. Additional information about their analysis can be found here.

The weekly report is also available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site atwww.nass.usda.gov/ia. The report summary follows here:

CROP REPORT

Iowa farmers had a good week for harvesting with 5.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending October 28, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Taking advantage of the dry conditions, activities for the week included harvesting corn and soybeans, baling stalks, anhydrous and manure application, fall tillage, and planting cover crops.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 0 percent short, 79 percent adequate and 21 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 1 percent short, 73 percent adequate and 26 percent surplus.

Forty-nine percent of the State’s corn for grain crop has been harvested, 3 days ahead of last year but 3 days behind the five-year average. Farmers in southeast Iowa have harvested 65 percent of their corn for grain while farmers in the northeast and southwest are yet to cross the 40 percent mark on their corn for grain harvest. Moisture content of field corn being harvested averaged 18 percent. Corn condition rated 69 percent good to excellent. Soybean harvest was 71 percent complete, a week behind the average. This is the smallest percentage of the soybean crop harvested by October 28 since 2009.

Pasture conditions rated 52 percent good to excellent. Feedlots are drying to more favorable condition.

IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY

By Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Unseasonably cool and dry conditions continued across Iowa during October’s last full week. Temperatures were generally near normal in western Iowa and up to four degrees cooler than normal in eastern Iowa. Statewide precipitation deficits were largest in southeastern Iowa. Average rainfall was around 0.12 inch; the normal for the week is 0.56 inch. A warm Monday (22nd) began the week with highs averaging between the mid-60 and lower 70s. A cold front dropped through Iowa on Tuesday (23rd) bringing cooler temperatures and pleasant conditions. Highs were generally in the 50s with overnight lows dropping into the upper 20s and lower 30s. Spotty rain showers moved into extreme western Iowa late Wednesday (24th) with measurable rainfall between 0.10 and 0.25 inch. Light rain lingered into Thursday (25 th) with highest two-day totals confined to Iowa’s western third ranging between 0.05 and 0.50 inch. Friday (26th) into Saturday (27th) was generally dry, though a weak warm front ahead of a surface low over Minnesota produced isolated showers in eastern Iowa. Highs were in the upper 60s with cloud cover keeping temperatures cooler in the northeast. As the low propagated east, a cold front moved through early Sunday (28th) bringing light rainfall to the northeastern two-thirds of Iowa. Behind the front clear to mostly sunny conditions prevailed with very gusty winds across Iowa’s eastern half. Under clear skies, overnight lows dropped into the upper 20s. The week’s high temperature of 73 degrees was reported in De Soto (Harrison County) on the 26 th , around 13 degrees above average. Elkader (Clayton County) and Stanley (Buchannan County) observed the week’s overnight low temperature of 19 degrees on the 22 nd , 16 degrees below normal. The highest weekly total rainfall accumulation of 0.62 inch was observed in Shenandoah (Page County).

NAIG COMMENTS ON IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, October 22, 2018

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Many farmers were able to get back into their fields this past week, but we still remain well behind the five-year average. The 29 percent of corn harvested is 4 days behind average and the 37 percent of beans harvested puts us 12 days behind,” Naig said. “Our farmers can make tremendous progress in a week if conditions allow. Farmers harvested 65 percent of soybeans in a single week back in 2013 and 30 percent of corn in a week in both 1993 and 2013. So, hopefully the drier weather stays in place and farmers can start to catch up.”

The Iowa Farm Bureau Federation and Decision Innovation Solutions have analyzed Iowa Crop Progress and Condition Reports going back to 1990 looking at the largest week of corn and soybean harvest each year. Additional information about their analysis can be found here.

The weekly report is also available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site at www.nass.usda.gov/ia. The report summary follows here:

CROP REPORT

Sunshine and a break from substantial precipitation got Iowa farmers back in the fields with 4.4 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending October 21, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Activities for the week included harvesting corn and soybeans, baling stalks and planting cover crops.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 0 percent short, 65 percent adequate and 35 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 2 percent short, 61 percent adequate and 37 percent surplus.

Twenty-nine percent of the State’s corn for grain crop has been harvested, 3 days ahead of last year but 4 days behind the five-year average. Farmers in southeast Iowa have neared the halfway point of corn for grain harvest while farmers in the northeast have not yet harvested one-fifth of their corn for grain. Moisture content of field corn being harvested was at 19 percent. Corn condition rated 68 percent good to excellent. Soybean harvest was 37 percent complete, 12 days behind the average. This is the smallest percentage of the soybean crop harvested by October 21 since 1985. Soybean condition rated 65 percent good to excellent.

Pasture conditions rated 55 percent good to excellent. Pastures have responded well to recent precipitation and cool temperatures. Cattle lots are still muddy but improving.

IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY

By Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

After an extremely wet start to October, abnormally dry conditions returned to Iowa. Statewide weekly precipitation deficits ranged from 0.20 to 0.70 inches. Northern Iowa observed the wettest conditions; Mason City (Cerro Gordo County) reported the week’s highest total accumulation of 0.61 inches. Unseasonably cool weather continued with average temperatures five to ten degrees below average. On Monday (15th) the remains of a cold front moved out of southeastern Iowa. Burlington (Des Moines County) reported 0.48 inches of rain. Tuesday (16th) through early night on Thursday (18th) was dry statewide with average highs in the middle to upper 50s in the eastern third of the state and lower to middle 60s across the rest of Iowa. Multiple locations in Iowa’s northwestern quadrant observed highs above 70 degrees on Wednesday (17th), up to 10 degrees above normal. A cold front with rain showers moved into Iowa Thursday night and lingered through late morning on Friday (19th). The heaviest rainfall occurred in northern Iowa; St. Ansgar (Mitchell County) recorded 0.50 inches. Much of Iowa’s southern two-thirds received between a trace and a tenth of an inch. Cloud cover moved out of Iowa later in the day Friday into Saturday (20th). A second cold front sped through Iowa on Saturday bringing cooler air and windy conditions statewide. Stations in eastern Iowa observed sustained winds between 20 to 30 miles per hour with gusts in the 40-50 mph range in the late afternoon. Sunday (21st) was pleasant as high pressure dominated the region. Skies were generally clear with unseasonable coolness. Red Oak (Montgomery County) and Shenandoah (Page County) reported the week’s high of 73 degrees on the 19th, nine degrees above average. Stanley (Buchanan County) observed the week’s low temperature of 18 degrees on the 21st, 17 degrees below average.

 

NAIG COMMENTS ON IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, October 15, 2018

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“The cool wet weather kept farmers mostly out of the fields and as a result they were only able to harvest 2 percent of corn and 1 percent of soybean acres. Corn harvest is now 4 days behind average and soybean harvest is 11 days behind. With just 19 percent of soybeans harvested as of Oct. 14, farmers are having the slowest bean harvest on record,” Naig said. “With dryer weather in the forecast, farmers will be putting in long hours to bring in the crop as quickly as possible when conditions allow. We again encourage everyone working on the farm or traveling on our rural roads to take the time needed to be safe during what can be a very busy and stressful time.”

The weekly report is also available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site atwww.nass.usda.gov/ia. The report summary follows here:

CROP REPORT

Rain and early snow showers limited Iowa farmers to just 0.8 day suitable for fieldwork during the week ending October 14, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Activities for the week included moving grain, monitoring field conditions and harvesting corn when weather permitted.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 0 percent short, 40 percent adequate and 60 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 1 percent very short, 2 percent short, 49 percent adequate and 48 percent surplus.

Ninety-seven percent of the corn crop was mature, 5 days ahead of the five-year average. Seventeen percent of the State’s corn for grain crop has been harvested, 4 days ahead of last year but 4 days behind average. Across the State farmers were only able to harvest 2 percent of their corn for grain crop during the week. Farmers in southeast Iowa continue to lead the way with 41 percent of their corn for grain harvested. Moisture content of field corn being harvested was at 20 percent. Corn condition rated 69 percent good to excellent. Ninety-seven percent of the soybean crop was dropping leaves, 5 days ahead of average. Nineteen percent of the soybean crop has been harvested, 11 days behind the average. This is the smallest percentage of the soybean crop harvested by October 14 since records began. Soybean condition rated 65 percent good to excellent.

Pasture conditions rated 55 percent good to excellent. Livestock conditions remain challenging after another week with significant precipitation left feedlots extremely muddy.

 

IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY

By Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

October’s second week brought up to four inches of above average precipitation to Iowa. Average temperatures were predominately cooler than expected; northwestern Iowa was 6 to 10 degrees below normal. Parts of western Iowa were near normal to warmer than average. The beginning of the reporting period was active with widespread showers and thunderstorms across Iowa on Monday (8th) as low pressure moved across the state. Knoxville (Marion County) reported a 24-hour accumulation of 4.25 inches. Over 40 stations reported rainfall above one inch. A strong cold front moved through Iowa on Tuesday (9th) with locally heavy rain. Average highs ranged from the upper 40s in the northwest to the upper 70s in the southeast. Over the two day period, severe thunderstorms produced 10 confirmed tornadoes, the strongest of which occurred Tuesday evening near Creston (Union County) with estimated winds up to 120 mph, causing structural damage. The cold front moved out of eastern Iowa early Wednesday (10th), leaving behind cloudy and unseasonably cool temperatures. Average highs varied from the 50s in the west and 60s to lower 70s ahead of the cold front. Dubuque (Dubuque County) reported 0.99 inches of rain. Light rain showers moved in on Friday (12th). Some locations in central Iowa reported snowflakes. Saturday (13th) was relatively dry with spotty showers late in the day in northwest Iowa. Sunday (14th) saw a mix of rain and snow with light accumulations on grass and elevated surfaces, especially in north-central Iowa. Weekend temperatures were below normal with highs in the upper 40s and lower 50s. Davenport (Scott County) observed the week’s high of 84 degrees on Monday, 18 degrees above normal. The week’s lowest temperature of 24 degrees was reported in Sanborn and Sheldon (O’Brien County) on the 14th, an average of 12 degrees below normal.

NAIG COMMENTS ON IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, October 9, 2018

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“This run of extremely wet weather has slowed harvest progress dramatically and as a result soybean harvest is now well behind the five-year average. We need the rains to stop and several days of dry weather so fields can dry and farmers are able to get back to harvest,” Naig said.

The weekly report is also available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site atwww.nass.usda.gov/ia. The report summary follows here:

CROP REPORT

Continued wet weather conditions allowed Iowa farmers just 1.6 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending October 7, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Activities for the week included harvesting corn and soybeans when weather permitted.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 0 percent short, 41 percent adequate and 59 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 1 percent very short, 2 percent short, 50 percent adequate and 47 percent surplus. Recent rains have boosted topsoil moisture supplies in south central and southeast Iowa to 99 percent adequate to surplus.

Ninety-five percent of the corn crop was mature, 9 days ahead of average. Fifteen percent of the State’s corn for grain has been harvested, 10 days ahead of last year. Farmers in southeast Iowa continue to lead the way with 39 percent of their corn for grain harvested. Moisture content of field corn being harvested was at 20 percent. Corn condition rated 70 percent good to excellent. Nearly all of the soybean crop was coloring with 94 percent dropping leaves, 8 days ahead of average. Eighteen percent of the soybean crop has been harvested, 5 days behind the average. Soybean condition rated 70 percent good to excellent.

The third cutting of alfalfa hay was nearly complete at 98 percent. Pasture condition improved slightly to 55 percent good to excellent. Muddy feedlot conditions have been a challenge for cattle producers.

 

IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY

By Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

The first week of October had unsettled conditions statewide with above average rainfall and generally below average temperatures. Precipitation totals were up to four inches above normal with higher accumulations in eastern Iowa. Temperatures were cooler than expected, except in the southeastern corner. Monday (1st) was a rainy day for Iowa’s northern two-thirds as a low pressure system moved into the state. Rainfall totals into Tuesday (2nd) morning were above one inch for over 40 stations with Dubuque (Dubuque County) reporting 2.31 inches, 2.21 inches above normal. Average highs ranged from the 50s in the northwest with gradual warming into the lower 70s towards the southeast. Showers and thunderstorms continued across northern parts of Iowa during the day on Wednesday (3rd). Statewide highs were in the upper 70s and low 80s. Late in the evening a cold front moved through Iowa, bringing rain to the southeast. Accumulations were under an inch with Newton (Jasper County) observing the highest total of 0.81 inches. With the cold front exiting Iowa early Thursday, highs cooled into the 50s. Multiple rounds of showers and thunderstorms moved through Iowa Friday (5th) through Sunday (7th), especially across the southern and eastern counties. Heavy rain was observed in eastern Iowa Friday evening into early Saturday (6th); Williamsburg (Iowa County) reported 3.65 inches, 3.55 inches above average. Stations from Marion to Scott counties recorded accumulations above two inches. Measurable rainfall was reported across much of Iowa on Sunday. Weekend highs ranged from the upper 40s in the north to lower 60s in the south. De Soto (Harrison County) observed the week’s warmest temperature of 93 degrees on the 2nd. Estherville (Emmet County) reported the week’s low of 30 degrees on the 4th. Statewide average precipitation was around 1.61 inches, 0.93 inches above the average of 0.68 inches.

NAIG COMMENTS ON IOWA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION REPORT

Monday, October 2, 2018

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistical Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Harvest is making steady progress despite soggy conditions across the state, with 11 percent of corn and 15 percent of soybeans harvested. The rains have helped pasture conditions, but have caused some delays getting the crop out. Many farmers are anxious for drier conditions, and hopefully weather will cooperate.”

The weekly report is also available on the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.IowaAgriculture.gov or on USDA’s site atwww.nass.usda.gov/ia. The report summary follows here:

 CROP REPORT

Soggy conditions persisted for yet another week leaving Iowa farmers just 3.1 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending September 30, 2018, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Activities for the week included seeding cover crops and harvesting corn, soybeans and hay when weather permitted.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 1 percent very short, 3 percent short, 69 percent adequate and 27 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 3 percent very short, 5 percent short, 67 percent adequate and 25 percent surplus. While topsoil moisture supplies in south central Iowa have improved to above 70 percent rated adequate to surplus, subsoil moisture levels still rated 59 percent short to very short.

Eighty-eight percent of the corn crop was mature, just over a week ahead of average. Eleven percent of the State’s corn for grain crop has been harvested, 5 days ahead of average. Farmers in southeast Iowa continue to lead the way with 29 percent of their corn for grain harvested. Moisture content of field corn being harvested was at 21 percent. Corn condition rated 75 percent good to excellent.

Nearly all of the soybean crop was coloring with 88 percent dropping leaves, 9 days ahead of average. Fifteen percent of the soybean crop has been harvested, 1 day ahead of average. Soybean condition rated 74 percent good to excellent.

The third cutting of alfalfa hay was nearly complete at 98 percent. Pasture conditions improved slightly to 53 percent good to excellent. Pastures have responded well to recent rains and cooler temperatures. Muddy conditions made feedlots challenging.

IOWA PRELIMINARY WEATHER SUMMARY

By Dr. Justin Glisan, State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

The last week of September brought cooler temperatures, averaging up to four degrees below normal. Iowa’s center third had above average rainfall sandwiched between below average accumulations in northern and southern Iowa. Monday (24th) was warm and dry, with average highs between 70 and 80 degrees. The warmest conditions were found in northern Iowa, where highs were up to eight degrees above normal. A cold front moved rapidly across Iowa on Tuesday (25th), bringing locally heavy rainfall to the state’s central and eastern portions. Toledo (Tama County) reported the week’s highest accumulation of 2.18 inches. Some storms turned severe with 60 mph wind gusts and tree damage reported in Linn County. A brief tornado touchdown occurred in Mechanicsville (Cedar County) causing minor damage. Wednesday (26th) was a pleasant day across Iowa with abundant sunshine and unseasonably cool temperatures. Daytime highs averaged in the mid-60s and overnight lows dipped into the lower 40s. Another cold front moved across Iowa on Thursday (27th) bringing light rain showers to the state’s northern half. Guttenberg (Clayton County) reported 0.58 inches of rainfall. Average highs were in the mid-60s, up to eight degrees cooler than normal. Rain continued into an unseasonably cool Friday (28th) with measurable rainfall across much of Iowa. This trend continued into Saturday (29th) and Sunday (30th) with spotty showers and thunderstorms across portions of Iowa. Accumulations were generally under an inch both days. Weekend temperatures were unseasonably cool, with highs in the upper 50s to lower 60s. Holstein (Ida County) observed a high of 48 degrees on Saturday, almost 24 degrees below average; this was the week’s coolest reading. The warmest observation was in Burlington (Des Moines County) with a high of 82 degrees on Wednesday, 10 degrees above average. Statewide average rainfall was about 0.08 inches above the normal of 0.72 inches.

 

 

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