Weekly Iowa Crops and Weather Report

Weekly Iowa Crop and Weather Report

Weekly Iowa Crop and Weather Report

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition 

Week of September 28 – October 4, 2020

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“As harvest continues, unseasonably cool temperatures persisted through last week as parts of northwestern Iowa reported the first killing freeze,” said Secretary Naig. “Moving forward, forecasts remain ideal for Iowa farmers with warmer and drier conditions continuing through the foreseeable future. With dry conditions continuing, farmers should be mindful of the risk of fire and continue to make safety a top priority.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Progress

Harvest made rapid progress again as Iowa farmers had 5.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending October 4, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Field activities also included baling corn stalks, applying fertilizer and manure, and fall tillage.

Topsoil moisture condition rated 14% very short, 31% short, 55% adequate and 0% surplus. Subsoil moisture condition rated 20% very short, 32% short, 48% adequate and 0% surplus.

Corn reached 92% mature or beyond, almost 3 weeks ahead of the previous year and 10 days ahead of the 5-year average. One-quarter of the corn for grain in the State has been harvested, over 3 weeks ahead of last year and 12 days ahead of average. This is only the second time since 2000 that at least one-quarter of the corn for grain crop was harvested by October 4. Moisture content of field corn being harvested for grain was at 20 percent. Corn condition rated 45% good to excellent.

Soybeans dropping leaves or beyond reached 93%, just over 2 weeks ahead of last year and 9 days ahead of average. One-quarter of Iowa’s soybean crop was harvested during the week ending October 4 with 55% now harvested. This is the second time in the last 15 years that at least half of the soybean crop was harvested by October 4. Farmers in south central Iowa are considerably behind farmers in the rest of the State with just 18% of their crop harvested. Soybean condition rated 49% good to excellent.

Pasture condition rated 20% good to excellent, unchanged from the previous week. Pasture growth is minimal with reduced daylight hours and cool temperatures. Some cattle producers have had to supplement water supplies.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

The final days of September into the beginning of October were unseasonably cool statewide with negative temperature departures ranging from six to ten degrees. The statewide average temperature was 50.2 degrees, 7.6 degrees below normal. Measurable rainfall was reported across Iowa as above-average totals were observed in the southeast. Drier than normal conditions were reported across the rest of Iowa with departures across northern Iowa ranging from 0.50 inch to 0.70 inch below normal.

A cold front pushed through Iowa during most of Sunday (27th) bringing measurable rainfall across the state. Totals at 7:00 am on Monday (28th) were highest across southeastern Iowa where nearly 20 stations reported an inch or more; Bloomfield (Davis County) observed 1.00 inch while Cantril (Van Buren County) reported 1.43 inches. Rain amounts tapered off moving northwest with general totals between 0.25 inch and 0.50 inch. Northwestern Iowa collected a tenth of an inch or less with the statewide average total of 0.32 inch. Cloudy and cool conditions remained behind the front as daytime highs only reached the upper 50s and low 60s with a gusty northwest wind. Spotty showers formed throughout the day behind a large low-pressure system moving over the Great Lakes with rain totals generally under a tenth of an inch at many Iowa stations. Cloud cover began to clear west to east into Tuesday (29th) morning allowing lows to dip into the upper 30s in southwestern Iowa while low to mid-40s were observed across the rest of the state. Stubborn clouds remained across eastern Iowa holding afternoon highs in the low 60s, while temperatures across the state were 10 to 15 degrees warmer under sunny skies and westerly winds. A weak cold front propagated through Iowa late in the day and into Wednesday (30th), bringing spotty showers across much the eastern half of Iowa. Rain gauge totals were light with Davenport (Scott County) reporting 0.17 inch. Totals farther west were generally under 0.10 inch where rain fell. High temperatures for the day were in the mid-60s and low 70s, near seasonal for early fall.

Thursday (1st) was a cloudy and cool day with temperatures only reaching into the 50s statewide under northwest flow. Very spotty showers were again reported across eastern Iowa, though amounts were light. Overnight lows into Friday (2nd) were some of the coldest of the season, as clear skies and no wind created radiational cooling. Some stations in northern Iowa reported lows in the 20s, likely producing the first killing freeze and ending the growing season. Southern and eastern Iowa observed lows in the low to mid-30s with a statewide average low of 33 degrees, 11 degrees below normal. Mostly sunny skies persisted through the day with afternoon highs rebounding into the 50s, though still unseasonably cool with light and variable winds. Cloud cover increased across western Iowa during the evening hours ahead of a disturbance that brought widespread rainfall over much of southern Iowa through Saturday (3rd). Dreary conditions persisted through the day with upper 40s reported at some southern Iowa stations; highs across the rest of the state were generally in the 50s. Skies cleared into Sunday (4th) morning as mid-20s were reported in northwest Iowa while 30s were reported across the rest of Iowa. Rain totals from the system were under 0.50 inch; Knoxville (Marion County) observed 0.49 inch. Rainfall amounts tapered off from a few tenths to under a tenth north of I-80.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from 0.01 inch at Rock Valley (Sioux County) to 1.67 inches at a gauge in Bloomfield (Davis County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.37 inch, while the normal is 0.70 inch. Clarinda (Page County) reported the week’s high temperature of 82 degrees on the 29th, 10 degrees above normal. Spencer Municipal Airport (Clay County) reported the week’s low temperature of 24 degrees on the 2nd, 17 degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition 

Week of September 21 – September 27, 2020

“Over the past week, Iowa saw mostly warmer and drier conditions, allowing harvest to continue across the state,” said Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig as he released the latest Iowa crop progress and condition report on Monday, September 28. “A shift in the weather pattern has brought cooler temperatures with forecasts indicating the possibility of the season’s first frost later this week.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Progress

Harvest showed rapid progress as Iowa farmers made the most of 6.4 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending September 27, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Field activities also included drilling cover crops, applying fertilizer and manure, and fall tillage.

Topsoil moisture condition rated 15% very short, 31% short, 53% adequate and 1% surplus. Subsoil moisture condition rated 21% very short, 34% short, 44% adequate and 1% surplus.

Corn was 97% in or beyond dent stage, over 2 weeks ahead of the previous year and 3 days ahead of the 5-year average. Only 18% of the crop has yet to reach maturity, 3 weeks ahead of last year and 9 days ahead of average. Corn harvest for grain reached 12% statewide, almost 3 weeks ahead of last year and 9 days ahead of average. This is the highest percent of corn harvested for grain completed by September 27 since 2012 when 48% of the crop had been harvested. Corn condition rated 42% good to excellent.
Soybeans coloring or beyond advanced to 96%, which is 2 weeks ahead of last year and 1 week ahead of average. Eighty-four percent of the soybean crop was dropping leaves or beyond, 16 days ahead of last year and 8 days ahead of average. Soybean harvest was 30% complete, 19 days ahead of last year and 12 days ahead of average. This was the largest proportion of soybeans harvested by September 27 since 2012 when 41% had been harvested. Farmers in northwest and west-central Iowa continue to lead the way with almost half of their soybean acreage harvested. Soybean condition rated 47% good to excellent.

Pasture condition rated 20% good to excellent, an increase of 3 percentage points from the previous week. Livestock felt the effect of changing temperatures. Low levels of water in ponds and creeks have made providing water for cows on pasture a challenge for some producers.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Widespread dry conditions persisted through the last full week of September though measurable rainfall was reported at stations in northern and eastern Iowa. Precipitation deficits were under an inch at most observation stations. Unseasonably warm temperatures blanketed the state with the warmest conditions in northwest Iowa as positive departures from eight to ten degrees were reported; the statewide average temperature was 66.6 degrees, 8.4 degrees above normal.

Sunny skies and a gusty southerly wind were reported across Iowa with afternoon temperatures on Sunday (20th) in the low to mid-70s. Winds died down overnight into Monday (21st) as morning lows in eastern Iowa dipped into the upper 40s with upper 50s reported in western Iowa. Daytime highs were slightly warmer, reaching into the upper 70s under mostly clear skies. An isolated line of very light showers pushed through northern Iowa during the evening hours, though only a handful of stations reported rain; Grafton (Worth County) observed the highest total of 0.02 inch. Tuesday (22nd) was another quiet day in Iowa with partly cloudy conditions and daytime temperatures reaching into the low to mid-80s in the northwest corner with closer to seasonal temperatures in eastern Iowa. Overnight lows into Wednesday (23rd) remained unseasonably warm, with many stations reporting mid to upper 50s; Storm Lake (Buena Vista County) observed 59 degrees, 11 degrees above normal. Foggy conditions were reported across southern Iowa while upper-level haze from western wildfires continued to tint the sky an eerie orangish hue. An approaching low-pressure center in Nebraska and South Dakota produced a southwesterly wind along with increasing cloudiness over portions of western and central Iowa. Afternoon temperatures remained in the upper 70s and low 80s.

A sluggish low-pressure center sat over western Iowa on Thursday (24th) producing variable winds in the state’s northwest corner while southerly winds were observed ahead of the system. A smaller, secondary disturbance pushed through northeastern Iowa through late afternoon producing some showers and isolated thunderstorms. Given the setup, there was a range of temperatures around the state, from the mid-70s east where cloud cover was present to the mid-80s west under sunny skies. Several stations in Allamakee, Fayette and Winneshiek counties reported rain gauge totals above 0.10 inch; Lansing (Allamakee County) reported 0.60 inch while a station in Decorah (Winneshiek County) reported 0.88 inch. As the low pushed east, cloud cover cleared with a prevailing southerly wind. Morning lows on Friday (25th) were unseasonably warm, ranging from the upper 50s to mid-60s; the statewide average low was 58 degrees, 11 degrees above normal. Afternoon highs were well above average with low 90s reported from southwest to north-central Iowa. Saturday (26th) was a very warm day across the state with higher-level cloud cover burning off into the afternoon hours. The statewide average high hit 82 degrees, 12 degrees above normal. A cold front began pushing through western Iowa into the early morning hours on Sunday (27th). Rain totals reported at 7:00 am were light across the state’s northwest corner.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from no accumulation at many Iowa stations to 1.15 inches at a gauge near Cresco (Winneshiek County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.06 inch, while the normal is 0.75 inch. Clarinda (Page County) reported the week’s high temperature of 95 degrees on the 25th, 23 degrees above normal. Fayette (Fayette County) reported the week’s low temperature of 35 degrees on the 21st, eight degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition 

Week of September 14 – September 20, 2020

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Tomorrow marks the official first day of fall and harvest is underway for many farmers across the state,” said Secretary Naig. “The drought monitor has improved in almost every part of Iowa and outlooks through the end of September indicate near ideal conditions that should keep combines rolling.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Progress

A week without measurable rainfall allowed farmers 6.2 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending September 20, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Field activities included harvesting corn for silage, fall tillage, moving old crop grain stocks, and harvesting corn for grain and soybeans.

Topsoil moisture condition rated 12% very short, 29% short, 56% adequate and 3% surplus. Subsoil moisture condition rated 21% very short, 32% short, 46% adequate and 1% surplus.

Corn was 94% in or beyond dent stage, over 2 weeks ahead of the previous year and 4 days ahead of the 5-year average. Two-thirds of the crop has reached maturity, 3 weeks ahead of last year and over a week ahead of average. Corn harvest for grain reached 4% statewide, 17 days ahead of last year and 5 days ahead of average. Corn condition rated 42% good to excellent, unchanged from the previous week. Soybeans coloring or beyond advanced to 90%. That is over 2 weeks ahead of last year and 1 week ahead of average. Two-thirds of the soybean crop was dropping leaves or beyond, also over 2 weeks ahead of last year and 1 week ahead of average. Soybean harvest was 7% complete, 17 days ahead of last year and 6 days ahead of average. Farmers in northwest and west central Iowa led the way with over 10% of their soybeans harvested. Soybean condition rated 48% good to excellent.

Alfalfa hay third cutting was 97% complete, a month ahead of last year and over 2 weeks ahead of the 5-year average. Pasture condition rated 17% good to excellent. Livestock experienced little stress with cooler temperatures.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Cooler and drier conditions persisted across the state through the reporting period as a quieter weather pattern settled over the Midwest. High-level smoke from western wildfire produced many hazy days as temperatures were up to three degrees below average in eastern Iowa; near-normal conditions were reported across much of western Iowa with a statewide average temperature of 61.0 degrees, 1.2 degrees below normal. After the wettest week of the reporting season, no measurable rainfall was reported across Iowa, leading to deficits on the order of 0.60 inch to over 0.80 inch.

Sunny and seasonal conditions greeted Iowa Sunday (13th) afternoon as clouds finally cleared the state. Daytime temperatures were seasonal, in the mid to upper 70s with variable winds. Under clear skies, morning lows on Monday (14th) dipped into the low 50s with low-level patchy fog observed at locations around the state. Winds shifted to a southerly direction during the afternoon as temperatures pushed into the upper 70s and low 80s. Tuesday (15th) was a warmer day across Iowa as southerly winds picked up under clear skies. High temperatures peaked in the low to mid 80s, slightly warmer than normal. Overnight lows into Wednesday (16th) were in the upper 50s and low 60s with partly cloudy conditions reported in southern Iowa. A weak cold front propagated northwest to southeast through the day, shifting winds to a northerly direction and ushering in cooler air. Temperatures ranged from the low 70s north to low 80s south; southeastern Iowa reported some mid 80 degree readings. Skies stayed mostly clear allowing morning lows to drop into the mid 40s to low 50s. With a dome of high pressure dominating the upper Midwest, conditions remained unseasonably cool, sunny and dry across Iowa. Temperatures stayed in the 60s and low 70s with a statewide average high of 69 degrees, five degrees below normal.

Thursday (17th) was another cool day across Iowa with temperatures in the mid 60s north to low 70s south under sunny skies and a light northerly wind. Overnight temperatures into Friday (18th) were chilly across northern Iowa, where upper 30s were reported at some stations. Temperatures did vary across the state, however, with low 50s across southern Iowa and 40s moving north. The statewide average low was 44 degrees, six degrees colder than normal. A westerly wind built in through the day as cloud cover filtered across eastern Iowa. Afternoon highs remained in the mid 60s east to low 70s west, still cooler than expected for this time of year. A high pressure system to the east of Iowa produced southerly winds into Saturday (19th) morning with partly cloudy conditions throughout the state. Winds picked up into the afternoon hours as temperatures remained consistent with the previous day. A copper-colored sunrise greeted the state on Sunday (20th) as high-level wildfire smoke persisted. Morning lows were generally in the mid 50s, though upper 40s were reported in eastern Iowa.

While the normal precipitation for the week is 0.77 inch, no measurable precipitation fell across the state during the reporting period. Four southeastern Iowa stations reported the week’s high temperature of 86 degrees on the 16th, on average nine degrees above normal. Mason City Municipal Airport (Cerro Gordo County) reported the week’s low temperature of 35 degrees on the 18th, 12 degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition 

Week of September 7 – September 13, 2020

On Monday, September 14, Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“After weeks of unseasonable dryness, most of the state received much needed widespread rainfall last week,” said Secretary Naig. “We expect to see improvement in the drought monitor this week as fieldwork and harvest ramps up across the state.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Progress

Most of Iowa had multiple days of much-needed rain, which only left just 1.4 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending September 13, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Field activities included harvesting corn for silage, moving old-crop grain stocks, and preparing equipment and bins for harvest.

Topsoil moisture condition rated 12% very short, 21% short, 59% adequate and 8% surplus. Subsoil moisture condition rated 20% very short, 31% short, 46% adequate and 3% surplus.

Corn was 90% in or beyond dent stage, over 2 weeks ahead of the previous year and 5 days ahead of the 5-year average. Forty-five percent of the crop has reached maturity, almost 3 weeks ahead of last year and 1 week ahead of average. Corn harvest for grain has begun across much of the State with 1% of the crop harvested. Corn condition rated 42% good to excellent, a drop of 1 percentage point from the previous week. Soybeans coloring or beyond advanced to 79%. That is over 2 weeks ahead of last year and 1 week ahead of average. Soybeans dropping leaves reached 41% this week, 2 weeks ahead of last year and 6 days ahead of average. Soybean harvest began in some areas with 1% of the crop harvested statewide. Soybean condition rated 48% good to excellent.

Alfalfa hay third cutting was 96% complete, over a month ahead of last year and 18 days ahead of the 5-year average. Pasture condition improved 5 percentage points this week although still just 17% good to excellent. Pastures are greening up as a result of receiving much-needed rain. Cattlemen continued supplemental feeding of hay.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

A significant shift in the storm track brought the wettest week of the reporting season to Iowa. More rain fell across the state than in the month of August with a vast majority of reporting stations observing positive departures; eastern Iowa reported up to five inches of above-normal rainfall. Unseasonably cool conditions also blanketed the state due to extended rainfall and cloud cover. Temperatures were up to 14 degrees cooler than normal with the statewide average temperature at 55.4 degrees, 11.3 degrees below normal.

Thunderstorms with locally heavy rainfall were present in eastern Iowa Sunday (6th) afternoon with light rain stretching into central Iowa. As the system cleared, mostly sunny skies returned and daytime highs pushed into the upper 80s and low 90s. Northerly winds built-in overnight, signaling a transition to a more active storm track with lows on Monday (7th) ranging from the mid 50s north to mid-60s south. Clouds increased through the day holding highs in the upper 60s and low 70s in the state’s northern half. A stationary front in southern Iowa allowed temperatures to rise into the upper 70s. Thunderstorms began forming along this boundary during late evening and quickly expanded to cover much of southern Iowa. A secondary complex of thunderstorms associated with an upper-level disturbance moved into northwestern Iowa overnight. The large-scale flow configuration brought waves of showers and thunderstorms over the next several days. On Tuesday (8th), temperatures were well below average and the coldest of the season, generally in the upper 40s and low 50s with the statewide average high temperature of 52 degrees, 26 degrees below normal. Multiple stations reported record low high temperatures for the date, breaking records from the late 1800s. Des Moines (Polk County) and Waterloo (Black Hawk County) both observed 51 degrees, besting their records of 54 and 58 degrees, respectively, set in 1898. Cloud cover held morning lows in the mid to upper 40s. Two-day rain totals reported at 7:00 am on Wednesday (9th) showed widespread amounts of at least an inch across a majority of reporting stations with nearly 100 stations observing over two inches. The highest totals were found in eastern Iowa ranging from 3.02 inches in Marengo (Iowa County) to 3.79 inches at Salem 1 S (Henry County); the statewide average rain total was 1.50 inches.

Rain showers continued through the day with a lull during the late evening hours before another round of showers moved into southwestern Iowa overnight into Thursday (10th). The rain shield spanned most of the state and slowly pushed out of eastern Iowa during late afternoon. Cloudy and cool conditions persisted with patchy mist and drizzle as temperatures remained in the 50s. Much of the central southwest to northeast one-third of Iowa received rainfall in the 0.50 to 1.00 inch range. Only a few stations in northwest Iowa did not report measurable rain. Elma (Howard County) observed 1.73 inches while the statewide average was 0.56 inch. Dreary conditions continued through Friday (11th) with widespread, persistent rainfall across Iowa’s eastern half. Western Iowa also saw wet conditions, though spottier than in the east. Afternoon temperatures were warmer than the last few days, peaking in the upper 50s and low 60s, still 10 – 20 degrees below average. Rain gauge measurements at 7:00 am on Saturday (12th) had the highest totals in eastern Iowa, where one to two-inch totals were frequently found; over 25 stations reported two inches or more with a gauge in Hopkinton (Delaware County) collecting 2.86 inches. Totals across the state’s central one-third were in the 0.30 to 0.75 inch range with lighter amounts towards the Iowa-Nebraska border. Spotty rain showers continued into the late-night hours as the upper-level low pushed east, though totals were generally light. Clouds began to decrease overnight into Sunday (13th) with low temperatures in the upper 40s and low 50s.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from 0.41 inch in Rock Rapids (Lyon County) to 6.88 inches at De Witt 4 (Scott County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 3.12 inches, almost four time the normal of 0.84 inch. Little Sioux 2NW (Harrison County) reported the week’s high temperature of 97 degrees on the 6th, 18 degrees above normal. Holstein 5 NNW (Ida County) reported the week’s low temperature of 39 degrees on the 9th, 12 degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition 

Week of August 24 – August 30, 2020

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“As fall approaches, corn silage and seed corn harvest is underway across the state. Fall cover crop seeding has also begun,” said Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig as he released the weekly crop progress and condition report on Tuesday, September 8. “A more active storm track this week will bring cooler conditions along with multiple chances of much-needed rain to drought-stricken areas of the state.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Progress

In spite of some locally heavy rain, Iowa farmers had 6.4 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending September 6, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Although drought conditions continue to be a concern for most of the State, some areas of northeast and east-central Iowa received over an inch of rain during the week. Field activities included harvesting hay, chopping corn silage and harvesting seed corn. There were reports of high moisture corn and a few soybean fields harvested.

Topsoil moisture condition rated 38% very short, 42% short, 20% adequate and 0% surplus. Subsoil moisture condition rated 38% very short, 41% short, 21% adequate and 0% surplus. The State’s topsoil and subsoil moisture conditions continue to be over three-quarters short to very short.

Corn was 84% in or beyond dent stage, 18 days ahead of the previous year and 1 week ahead of the 5-year average. Over one-quarter of the crop was mature, almost 3 weeks ahead of last year and just over 1 week ahead of average. Corn condition rated 43% good to excellent, a drop of 2 percentage points from the previous week.

Soybeans coloring or beyond advanced to 58%. That is 2 weeks ahead of last year and 1 week ahead of average. Soybeans dropping leaves reached 19% this week, two weeks ahead of last year and 1 week ahead of average. This is the highest percentage dropping leaves by September 6 since 2005. Soybean condition fell again this week with the crop now rated 47% good to excellent, the lowest level so far this season.

Alfalfa hay third cutting was 93% complete, over a month ahead of last year and 2 weeks ahead of the 5-year average. Pasture condition fell 4 percentage points this week to just 12% good to excellent. Over half of Iowa’s pastures are in poor to very poor condition. Cattlemen continue supplemental feeding of hay due to deteriorating pasture conditions.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Parts of Iowa received much-needed rainfall during the first week of meteorological fall with the northeast one-third of the state reporting above-average totals. Dryness continued to grip much of Iowa, however, with deficits on the order of an inch across most of the state. Overall, cooler conditions prevailed during the reporting period with northeast Iowa observing temperatures up to four degrees below normal. The statewide average temperature was 67.7 degrees, 1.6 degrees below normal.

Sunday (30th) was a pleasant day in Iowa with sunny skies and a southerly wind. Daytime highs remained seasonal, generally in the upper 70s and low 80s. Cloud cover increased overnight as a low-pressure center pushed into northern Iowa. The low’s attendant cold front swept across Iowa through the day on Monday (31st), firing showers and thunderstorms that left measurable rainfall over much of the state. Afternoon temperatures behind the front fell into the low to mid-70s as skies cleared west to east. Where rain fell, totals were generally between 0.10 inch to 0.30 inch with higher totals reported along Iowa’s northern and southern borders; Lansing (Allamakee County) reported 0.78 inch while Clarinda (Page County) observed 1.13 inches. A secondary complex of thunderstorms moved into southern Iowa along a warm front early on Tuesday (1st) and remained over eastern Iowa for most of the day. Temperatures, in the low to mid-70s, remained cooler than average under cloud cover as the system cleared the state. Rain totals reported at 7:00 am on Wednesday (2nd) for the previous 24 hours showed measurable totals across the state’s southeastern half. Many gauges in south-central and eastern Iowa reported totals above 0.50 inch with several gauges in Wayne County reporting rainfall in the range of 0.89 inch to 1.07 inches; Bedford (Taylor County) observed 1.08 inches. Sunny skies and southwesterly winds pushed highs into the mid-80s to low 90s with a statewide average high of 86 degrees, seven degrees above normal. Overnight lows remained in the 60s with some stations reporting low 70s.

A weak cold front propagated west to east across Iowa beginning early Thursday (3rd) morning with a wind shift to a northerly direction. Windy conditions remained throughout the day, peaking in the 20 to 30 mph range with locally higher gusts. Daytime temperatures stayed in the 70s. Morning temperatures on Friday (4th) were some of the coolest of the season, ranging from the low 40s into the low 50s; the statewide average low was 48 degrees, nine degrees below normal. Conditions during the afternoon were near seasonal with temperatures in the low 80s. Saturday (5th) was a warm day across western Iowa with highs reaching into the upper 80s and low 90s. Conditions in northeastern Iowa were cooler with northerly winds holding temperatures in the upper 70s and low 80s. During the late evening, thunderstorms began popping up in north-central Iowa and quickly pushed southeast. Stronger storms, some severe, were embedded within a larger rain shield that brought locally heavy rain through northeast Iowa. There were also several reports of large hail and severe straight-line winds; an 83 mph gust was reported in Titonka (Kossuth County). Widespread rain also fell across a large swath of eastern Iowa with over 60 stations reporting an inch or more at 7:00 am on Sunday (6th). Several gauges in eastern Iowa collected over three inches of rain; Clinton No. 1 (Clinton County) reported 3.07 inches while Monticello (Jones County) reported 5.58 inches. The statewide average rain total was 0.58 inch.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from no accumulation at several stations in southwest Iowa to 5.78 inches in Monticello (Jones County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.69 inch while the normal is 0.84 inch. Little Sioux 2NW (Harrison County) reported the week’s high temperature of 95 degrees on the 5th, 16 degrees above normal. Elkader 6 SSW (Clayton County) reported the week’s low temperature of 41 degrees on the 4th, 12 degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition 

Week of August 31 – September 6, 2020

Crop Progress

Continued dry weather allowed Iowa farmers 6.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending August 30, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Drought conditions and rapidly drying crops are now a concern for most of the State. Field activities included harvesting hay, chopping corn silage and harvesting seed corn. Some farmers have been cleared to mow or disc in their corn damaged by the derecho.

Topsoil moisture condition rated 41% very short, 40% short, 19% adequate and 0% surplus. The State’s topsoil moisture condition deteriorated to 81% short to very short. Subsoil moisture condition rated 37% very short, 40% short, 23% adequate and 0% surplus. The State’s subsoil moisture condition dropped to over three-quarters short to very short.

Corn was 95% in the dough stage or beyond, over 2 weeks ahead of the previous year and 6 days ahead of the 5-year average. Almost three-quarters of the corn crop was in or beyond dent stage, over 2 weeks ahead of the previous year and 1 week ahead of average. The crop seems to be speeding towards maturity with 11% of the crop mature, 18 days ahead of last year and 6 days ahead of average. Corn condition rated 45% good to excellent, a drop of 5 percentage points from the previous week and the lowest level since the week ending October 20, 2013. Soybeans setting pods were over 2 weeks ahead of last year and 4 days ahead of average at 96%. Soybeans coloring reached 29%. That is the highest percentage of soybeans coloring by August 30 since 2012. Soybean condition fell again this week with the crop now rated 50% good to excellent, the lowest level so far this season.
Alfalfa hay third cutting was 86% complete, almost 3 weeks ahead of last year and 11 days ahead of the 5-year average. Pasture condition fell 7 percentage points this week to just 16% good to excellent. Many cattlemen have had to begin supplemental feeding of hay due to deteriorating pasture conditions.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

August 24-30 was the driest reporting period of the summer and of the 2020 growing season thus far. All Iowa stations, with the exception of one, reported below-average precipitation with deficits near an inch at rain gauges in eastern Iowa. Much of the reporting period also had temperatures well above average with the highest departures, on the order of 10-12 degrees, in western Iowa. The statewide average temperature was 77.3 degrees, 6.1 degrees above normal.

Sunday (23rd) afternoon temperatures pushed into the low to mid-90s under mostly sunny skies and variable winds. Morning lows on Monday (24th) did not retreat substantially, remaining in the upper 60s and low 70s. Patchy low-lying fog was reported near sunrise at many stations in northeastern Iowa. With a light southerly wind and hazy conditions from western wildfire smoke, daytime highs rose into the mid to upper 90s; the statewide average high was 94 degrees, 13 degrees above normal, making it one of the warmest days of the year. Overnight lows into Tuesday (25th) were similar to those observed on the previous day with a small area of very light rain in northwest Iowa. Afternoon temperatures remained well above average, in the 90s under breezy and sunny conditions. Temperatures reported on Wednesday (26th) were unseasonably warm, lending to a muggy morning. Readings ranged from the upper 60s to mid-70s with an average low of 68 degrees, nine degrees above normal; Fort Madison (Lee County) observed 76 degrees, 11 degrees warmer than normal. High temperatures were slightly cooler, generally in the low to mid-90s.

Thursday (27th) was yet again warm, though clouds started to filter into the state ahead of a low-pressure center in Nebraska. The system propagated along the Iowa-Minnesota border over the evening hours through early Friday (28th) morning, firing showers and thunderstorms. Some of the thunderstorms were strong, leaving behind measurable rain across the northern first tier of counties. Totals were light ranging from 0.01 inch in Spencer (Clay County) to 0.78 inch in Elma (Howard County). The low-pressure center’s attendant cold front moved through Iowa during the day creating a temperature spread from the low 80s northwest to low 90s southeast. Thunderstorms fired along the front through the evening hours in eastern Iowa, some turning severe. There were a handful of reports of one-inch hail and straight-line winds causing isolated structural and tree damage in Hopkinton (Delaware County). Widespread measurable rain also fell across the state with totals of up to 0.75 inch in De Witt (Clinton County) and Osage (Mitchell County). Many stations that did report rain generally observed a few tenths of an inch with a statewide average total of 0.07 inch. Morning temperatures on Saturday (29th) dipped into the low to mid-50s across northern Iowa behind the front, as winds shifted to a northerly direction. Afternoon conditions were pleasant with near seasonal temperatures in the upper 70s and low 80s. Overnight lows into Sunday (30th) dropped into the mid-50s with some upper 40s in north-central Iowa. The statewide average low was 51 degrees, seven degrees below normal.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from no accumulation at more than half of Iowa’s stations to 1.68 inches in Monticello (Jones County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.11 inch while the normal is 0.96 inch. Several stations reported the week’s high temperature of 99 degrees on the 24th, on average 18 degrees above normal. Chariton 1 E (Lucas County) reported the week’s low temperature of 44 degrees on the 30th, 13 degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition 

Week of August 17 – August 23, 2020

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Isolated thunderstorms brought needed rainfall to northern and eastern Iowa towards the end of last week, though much of Iowa missed out,” said Secretary Naig. “With the continued lack of rainfall, drought conditions expanded across the state. High temperatures over the next several days will add to the challenges of moisture stress and the recent derecho.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Progress

Mostly dry weather allowed Iowa farmers 6.6 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending August 23, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Dry conditions are now a concern for most of the State. Field activities included harvesting hay and chopping corn silage.

Topsoil moisture condition rated 31% very short, 45% short, 24% adequate and 0% surplus. The State’s topsoil moisture condition deteriorated to over three- quarters short to very short. Subsoil moisture condition rated 28% very short, 43% short, 29% adequate and 0% surplus. The State’s subsoil moisture condition fell to almost three-quarters short to very short. These are the highest levels of short to very short topsoil and subsoil moisture conditions since September 2013.

Corn was 91% in the dough stage or beyond, over 2 weeks ahead of the previous year and 6 days ahead of the 5-year average. Almost half of the corn crop was in or beyond dent stage, 12 days ahead of the previous year and 5 days ahead of average. Corn condition rated 50% good to excellent, a drop of 9 percentage points from the previous week and the lowest level this crop season. Soybeans setting pods were 18 days ahead of last year and over a week ahead of average at 95%. Soybean condition fell again this week with the crop now rated 56% good to excellent, the lowest level so far this season. Oats for grain harvest is virtually complete.

Alfalfa hay third cutting was 68% complete, 12 days ahead of last year and 3 days ahead of the 5-year average. Pasture condition fell 10 percentage points this week to just 23% good to excellent. Some farmers have been cleared to hay or graze CRP acres due to drought conditions.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

A quiet weather pattern persisted through much of the reporting period, perpetuating dry conditions over much of Iowa. Sections of north-central Iowa reported above average rain over the weekend, though extended dryness persists. Drought conditions continue to expand across the region as widespread rains have not yet materialized. Average temperatures varied from unseasonable warmth in northwestern Iowa to cooler than normal conditions in southern and eastern Iowa. The statewide average temperature was 70.8 degrees, 1.1 degrees below normal.

A few isolated thunderstorms popped up across western Iowa during the late afternoon on Sunday (16th). Daytime highs were in the mid to upper 80s under mostly sunny skies. A small line of thundershowers pushed into northern Iowa overnight but dissipated shortly thereafter. Rain totals were reported at multiple stations in northern Iowa at 7:00 am on Monday (17th) with the highest totals at a handful of stations in north-central Iowa; Nora Springs (Floyd County) observed 0.57 inch while Grafton (Worth County) reported 0.65 inch. Winds shifted to a northerly direction behind a weak cold front with afternoon temperatures ranging from the upper 70s north to mid-80s south. Some isolated thundershowers formed in southeastern Iowa, though totals were very light. Overnight lows into Tuesday (18th) dipped into the low to mid-50s under starry skies; there were also some isolated upper 40s reported in northern Iowa. The statewide average low was 54 degrees, seven degrees below normal. A dome of high pressure dominated the Midwest lending to pleasant conditions throughout the day. Highs were near seasonal, generally in the upper 70s and low 80s with a light, variable wind. Wednesday (19th) was another nice day statewide as southerly winds and sunny skies helped boost temperatures into the mid-80s as the high-pressure center pushed east of Iowa. Morning lows into Thursday (20th) remained in the upper 50s and low 60s under mostly clear skies. Dry conditions persisted through the day as seasonal temperatures in the low to mid-80s prevailed.

A few thundershowers moved into northern Iowa in the early morning hours on Friday (21st), though rainfall was light. Sunny skies remained through the afternoon as daytime temperatures climbed into the upper 80s with some low 90s observed in western Iowa. Cloud cover increased in northern Iowa overnight as a line of thunderstorms pushed over the Iowa-Minnesota border just after midnight. The complex moved slowly over north-central Iowa and into eastern Iowa during late Saturday (22nd) morning. Daytime highs hit the upper 80s and low 90s in western Iowa with upper 70s and low 80s in eastern Iowa, where clouds and rain were present. Additional showers and thunderstorms fired over portions of the state through the evening hours. Sluggish thunderstorms persisted in eastern Iowa overnight into Sunday (23rd). Measurable rainfall was reported at nearly 80 stations with many of those observations below 0.20 inch; a handful of stations reported an inch or more with Mason City Municipal Airport (Cerro Gordo County) registering 1.22 inches while Northwood (Worth County) observed 1.65 inches. De Witt (Clinton County) and Maquoketa (Jackson County), two stations in eastern Iowa, both reported 2.05 inches.

Weekly rain totals ranged from no accumulation at many stations across Iowa to 3.39 inches at Lake Mills (Winnebago County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.21 inch while the normal is 0.89 inch. Spencer Municipal Airport (Clay County) reported the week’s high temperature of 95 degrees on the 21st, 14 degrees above normal. Several stations reported the week’s low temperature of 47 degrees on the 20th, on average 12 degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition 

Week of August 10 – August 16, 2020

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“It’s been one week since the catastrophic derecho hit Iowa. There were 57 counties in the path of the storm, with 36 counties experiencing severe crop damage. There was also significant structural damage to grain storage facilities,” said Secretary Naig. “Clean-up continues and farmers are working with their crop insurance adjusters and agronomists to gain a better insight into the yield impact of the storm.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Progress

A derecho blew across Iowa but farmers had 5.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending August 16, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Dry conditions continued to be a concern for most of the State. High winds experienced on Monday caused considerable damage to on- and off-farm grain storage in their path as well as other structures. The level of crop damage reported varied widely depending on location and wind strength.

Topsoil moisture condition rated 20% very short, 36% short, 42% adequate and 2% surplus. The State’s topsoil moisture condition remained over half short to very short although it improved slightly. Subsoil moisture condition rated 17% very short, 36% short, 46% adequate and 1% surplus. The State’s subsoil moisture condition also remained over half short to very short.

Corn was 81% in the dough stage or beyond, almost 2 weeks ahead of the previous year and 5 days ahead of the 5-year average. Just over one-quarter of the corn crop is in or beyond dent stage, 11 days ahead of the previous year and 3 days ahead of average. Corn condition rated 59% good to excellent, a drop of 10 percentage points from the previous week and the lowest level this crop season. Soybeans were 97% blooming or beyond, 3 days ahead of average. Soybeans setting pods were over 2 weeks ahead of last year and 1 week ahead of average at 90%. Soybean condition fell again this week, and the crop is now rated 62% good to excellent, the lowest level so far this season. Only 3% of oats remain to be harvested for grain, 2 days ahead of both last year and the average.

Alfalfa hay second cutting was 97% complete, 4 days ahead of last year but 1 day behind the 5-year average. Just over half of the third cutting is complete, 10 days ahead of the previous year. Pasture condition fell to just 33% good to excellent.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

A powerful line of severe thunderstorms, known as a derecho, brought widespread agricultural and structural damage across rural and urban areas of Iowa on Monday, August 10. Moderate to heavy rain also fell along the path of the derecho with scattered thunderstorms over the next few days. Dryness persisted around much of the state with deficits on the order of an inch. Sections of central Iowa reported up to an inch of above-average rainfall with locally higher amounts. Slightly warmer conditions were also observed across much of Iowa with the statewide average temperature of 72.9 degrees, 1.1 degree above normal.

Thunderstorms moved through eastern Iowa during the late afternoon hours on Sunday (9th) before clearing the state. Behind the system, cloud cover cleared with a southerly wind pushing daytime highs into the upper 80s and low 90s. Rain totals were heaviest in northwest Iowa with widespread amounts above 0.50 – 0.75 inch. A handful of stations also reported totals above one inch with Guttenberg Lock and Dam (Clayton County) reporting 1.32 inches. Monday (10th) will go down as a significant weather day in state history. A derecho, which is a convectively initiated straight-line windstorm, propagated through Iowa’s central west-to-east corridor. This derecho was one of the strongest and most widespread to hit Iowa. Damage to crops, grain bins and structures was catastrophic with millions of acres of damaged corn and soybeans. Urban areas from Des Moines (Polk County), Cedar Rapids (Linn County) to the Quad Cities reported substantial and long lasting power outages along with severe damage to trees and structures from extremely strong sustained winds. Preliminary wind gusts along the derecho’s path ranged from 58 mph to well over 100 mph; according to the National Weather Service, “maximum recorded wind speeds were around 110 mph over portions of Benton and Linn Counties in eastern Iowa.” Midway (Linn County) observed the fastest wind speed of 112 mph. Moderate to heavy rain fell across sections of Iowa with general totals above 0.50 inch and locally heavier amounts in eastern Iowa; a rain gauge in Hopkinton (Delaware County) recorded 2.23 inches while the statewide average was 0.40 inch. Calm conditions returned on Tuesday (11th) with sunny skies and afternoon temperatures in the low 80s.

Overnight lows on Wednesday (12th) were also comfortable, ranging from the upper 50s north to upper 60s south. Light showers moved into western Iowa over the early morning hours, then into portions of west-central Iowa before dissipating later in the day; rain amounts were under a tenth of an inch. Warm and humid conditions built back in to the state with highs reaching into the upper 80s under hazy skies. Morning lows remained warmer than average, by up to nine degrees in western Iowa, dropping only into the low 70s. Thursday (13th) was another warm day with highs in the mid to upper 80s; some 90 degree readings were observed in southern Iowa. Skies were clear to mostly sunny with a few passing cumulus clouds and a southerly wind. Conditions on Friday (14th) were near seasonal, generally in the mid-80s. A cold front slowly moved into Iowa during the later afternoon and evening hours, bringing a few stronger storms into western Iowa. The front re-fired showers and thunderstorms from the northeast into central Iowa overnight into Saturday (15th). The highest totals were reported in Des Moines, ranging from 0.80 to 1.22 inches. Widespread rain also fell through northeastern Iowa, though common totals were around a few tenths of an inch. Northerly winds, sunny skies and highs in the upper 70s and low 80s lent to a very pleasant day. Overnight lows into Sunday (16th) were cooler than average, in the mid 50s to low 60 with the statewide average low of 55 degrees, five degrees below normal.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from no accumulation at several stations in southwest Iowa to 2.40 inches in Story City (Story County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.67 inch while the normal is 0.96 inch. Burlington Municipal Airport (Des Moines County) reported the week’s high temperature of 94 degrees on the 10th, 9 degrees above normal. Spencer Municipal Airport (Clay County) reported the week’s low temperature of 48 degrees on the 15th, 11 degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition 

Week of August 3 – August 9, 2020

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Many farmers and agribusinesses experienced damage to crops, grain bins and buildings as severe storms tracked across the state this morning. My thoughts are with everyone who was affected as they begin clean up,” said Secretary Naig. “Though some parts of Iowa received beneficial rainfall last week, drought conditions continued to expand, including the introduction of extreme drought in west-central Iowa. Cooler temperatures helped relieve some drought-related stresses. Chances of thunderstorms and seasonably warm temperatures continue through the next several days.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Progress

Most of Iowa saw little to no rain as farmers had 6.4 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending August 9, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Fieldwork activities continue to be spraying, harvesting hay and grain movement.

Topsoil moisture condition rated 22% very short, 39% short, 38% adequate and 1% surplus. For the first time since the week ending September 17, 2017, the State’s topsoil moisture condition rated over half short to very short. Subsoil moisture condition rated 16% very short, 37% short, 46% adequate and 1% surplus. This was the first time since the week ending October 1, 2017, the State’s subsoil moisture condition rated over half short to very short.

Corn was 66% in the dough stage or beyond, 12 days ahead of the previous year and 5 days ahead of the 5-year average. Corn in dent stage reached 9%. That is over a week ahead of the previous year, but just 1 day ahead of average. Corn condition fell to 69% good to excellent. Soybeans were 94% blooming or beyond, 4 days ahead of average. Soybeans setting pods are 2 weeks ahead of last year and a week ahead of average at 83%. Soybean condition fell to 70% good to excellent. Oats harvested for grain was 94% complete, 6 days ahead of last year and 4 days ahead of the average.

Alfalfa hay second cutting was 94% complete, 5 days ahead of last year but equal to the 5-year average. The third cutting was 37% complete, 10 days ahead of the previous year but equal to average. Hay condition continued to decline at 60% good to excellent. Pasture condition fell to just 37% good to excellent.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Cooler conditions greeted Iowa through the first full week of August with negative temperature departures of up to eight degrees reported across the southern part of the state. Iowa’s average temperature was 69.4 degrees, 2.7 degree below normal. Dryness persisted statewide through west-central Iowa, which is now experiencing extreme drought, did receive much needed rainfall. Portions of northwestern Iowa had precipitation deficits slightly over an inch.

Scattered showers and a few thunderstorms continued to push through southern Iowa into Sunday (2nd) afternoon as skies cleared north to south with a northerly wind. Where rain fell, totals were generally under a few tenths of inch, though some stations reported higher totals where storms lingered; Chariton (Lucas County) reported 1.05 inches. High temperatures were comfortable and cooler than average, generally in the mid to upper 70s. Overnight lows into Monday (3rd) were well below normal statewide with the coldest readings across northern Iowa, where mid 40s were reported. Temperatures across the rest of Iowa were in the 50s with the statewide average low of 54 degrees, nine degrees cooler than normal. High pressure dominated the pattern through the day into Tuesday (4th) as temperatures remained unseasonably cool, in the low to mid 70s on both days. A small disturbance pushed into western Iowa during the night into early Wednesday (5th) morning before bringing light, but measurable, rainfall before dissipating as it moved into central Iowa. Rainfall was under 0.20 inch for a majority of the stations though gauges in northwest Iowa collected higher amounts; a station in Le Mars (Plymouth County) reported 0.24 inch while Denison (Crawford County) observed 0.44 inch. Partly to mostly cloudy skies persisted as daytimes highs remained in the 70s with a southerly wind.

Widely scattered thunderstorms formed in western Iowa early Thursday (6th) morning and persisted through the afternoon hours. Some storms in central Iowa turned severe with a report of 1.50 inch hail in Coon Rapids (Carroll County). Rain totals were highest in central Iowa with reports between 0.20 inch to 0.50 inch. Heavier rainfall was also observed in west-central Iowa from stronger thunderstorms with seven stations reporting over an inch; Perry (Dallas County) reported 1.00 inch while Madrid (Boone County) observed 1.59 inches. Morning temperatures on Friday (7th) ranged from the upper 60s northwest to low 60s southeast with a light southerly wind. Partly cloudy skies persisted through the afternoon with near-seasonal highs in the low 80s. Saturday (8th) was a warm and dry day across the state with highs reaching in the upper 80s and low 90s; the statewide average high was 88 degrees, four degrees above normal. A line of strong thunderstorms pushed into western Iowa during the early morning hours on Sunday (9th) ahead of a warm front. Additional storms fired across southwestern Iowa and continued to push towards central Iowa. Rain totals were highest across the state’s northwest quadrant and ranged from 0.01 inch in Ames (Story County) to 0.80 inch in Remsen (Plymouth County).

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from no accumulation at several stations to 1.60 inches in Madrid (Boone County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.23 inch while the normal is 0.98 inch. Waterloo Municipal Airport (Black Hawk County) reported the week’s high temperature of 93 degrees on the 8th, 10 degrees above normal. Mason City Municipal Airport (Cerro Gordo County) reported the week’s low temperature of 43 degrees on the 4th, 17 degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition 

Week of July 27 – August 6, 2020

On Monday, Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November and is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

“While spotty thunderstorms brought much-needed rainfall to parts of the western Iowa drought region, other areas were not as fortunate and drought conditions persist,” said Secretary Naig. “As we begin August, cooler temperatures and chances of thunderstorms are expected over the short-term, which would be beneficial to moisture-stressed corn and soybeans.”

Crop Progress

Although some areas of Iowa received more than an inch of rain, statewide farmers had 6.0 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending August 2, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Fieldwork activities continue to be primarily spraying, harvesting hay and grain movement. Reports of aerial applications of fungicide continue.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 14% very short, 33% short, 51% adequate, and 2% surplus. Northwest, West Central, and Central Iowa all report topsoil moisture supplies are mostly short to very short. Subsoil moisture levels rated 10% very short, 31% short, 57% adequate, and 2% surplus.

Corn silking or beyond reached 95%, 2 weeks ahead of the previous year and 5 days ahead of the 5-year average. Corn in the dough stage or beyond reached 44%, 10 days ahead of the previous year and 4 days ahead of the average. Corn condition declined to 73% good to excellent. Soybeans blooming reached 91%, 2 weeks ahead of last year, and 6 days ahead of average. Soybeans setting pods reached 70%, 16 days ahead of last year and 6 days ahead of average. Soybean condition also fell to 73% good to excellent. Nearly all of the oats are turning color or beyond. Oats harvested for grain reached 85%, over 1 week ahead of last year and 5 days ahead of the average.

Alfalfa hay second cutting reached 90%, 1 week ahead of last year but the same as the 5-year average. Third cutting reached 17%, 5 days ahead of the previous year but 2 days behind average. Hay condition rated 66% good to excellent. Pasture condition rated 46% good to excellent. For the first time since the week ending April 5, 2020, less than half of pastures were rated good to excellent.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Temperatures through the last week of July were seasonal across much of the state with sections of eastern Iowa reporting slightly warmer conditions. Iowa’s average temperature was 73.0 degrees, 0.4 degrees above normal. Unseasonably dry conditions continued over a majority of Iowa, though parts of the state’s southwestern corner reported rainfall totals of up to two inches above normal. In the opposite corner of Iowa, departures of more than an inch below normal were observed.

An upper-level disturbance continued to move south through Sunday (26th) afternoon, bringing light to moderate rainfall to much of Iowa. Following closely behind, a sluggish cold front re-fired evening thunderstorms in southern Iowa. Showers and thunderstorms remained over southern Iowa into Monday (27th) morning as temperatures behind the front dipped into the upper 50s and low 60s across Iowa’s northern third. Rain totals for the previous 24 hours showed that the highest amounts occurred in southern Iowa with over 40 stations reporting an inch or more. Many stations in the southwest reported over two inches with a gauge in Osceola (Clarke County) observing 3.01 inches; the statewide average rainfall was 0.41 inch. As skies cleared though the afternoon, highs reached into the low to mid-80s with a light northerly wind. With high pressure controlling the pattern, clear skies overnight into Tuesday (28th) dropped morning temperatures into the low to mid-60s; some upper 50s were also reported, up to four degrees below normal. Daytime highs rebounded into the mid to upper 80s with sunny skies and southerly winds. Isolated showers formed in northern Iowa with some stronger storms leaving higher amounts in the state’s northwest corner. Rainfall ranged from a trace at a handful of stations in north-central Iowa to 1.15 inches at Akron (Plymouth County).

A boundary set up over northern Iowa separated cloudy skies and northerly winds from clear conditions and southerly winds across southern Iowa into Wednesday (29th) morning; temperatures were generally in the 60s. As the boundary transitioned to a warm front, partly cloudy conditions pushed farther south as morning lows remained in the upper 60s and low 70s. As the day progressed, showers and storms pushed into southwest Iowa. With muggy conditions and temperatures in the 80s, additional thunderstorms formed along the warm front during the afternoon. Some of these storms persisted along a concentrated east-west swath across the middle of Iowa. A low-pressure center in northern Missouri spun additional bands of scattered thunderstorms into eastern Iowa through Thursday (30th). Morning rain totals along the Iowa-Nebraska border were between 0.30 inch to around one inch with locally heavier totals. There was also another pocket of heavier rain in east-central Iowa where Marengo (Iowa County) reported 2.44 inches. Gusty northerly winds and cloudy skies kept afternoon highs in the upper 70s and low 80s. A pocket of thundershowers worked across southeastern Iowa during the evening hours and pushed southwest before dissipating; rainfall was generally under a few tenths of an inch. Friday (31st) was another pleasant day with highs similar to Thursday and lower relative humidity. The average statewide high was 82 degrees, two degrees below normal. High pressure lent to quiet conditions into Saturday (1st) though clouds were on the increase in western Iowa as scattered thundershowers pushed into the northwest quadrant. Additional showers popped up in northern Iowa into Sunday (2nd) morning. The state’s western one-third picked up measurable totals on the order of few tenths to near an inch. Low temperatures were in the mid 50s to mid 60s with departures of up to 10 degrees below normal at some stations.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from no accumulation at stations in northern Iowa to 3.22 inches in Oakland (Pottawattamie County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.62 inch while the normal is 0.94 inch. Multiple stations in eastern Iowa reported the week’s high temperature of 94 degrees on the 26th, on average 10 degrees above normal. Webster City (Hamilton County) reported the week’s low temperature of 51 degrees on the 1st, 10 degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition 

Week of July 20 – July 26, 2020

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Drought conditions continued to expand across western Iowa over the last week,” said Secretary Naig. “Some parts of the drought region did receive much-needed rainfall. Forecasts show we should expect seasonal temperatures and additional chances of isolated storms through the last week of July.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Progress

Another week with primarily spotty rains meant farmers had 6.0 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 26, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Fieldwork activities included spraying, harvesting hay and grain movement. Aerial application of fungicides was also reported.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 11% very short, 27% short, 59% adequate and 3% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 6% very short, 26% short, 65% adequate and 3% surplus. West-central Iowa topsoil and subsoil moisture supplies are the lowest in the State with well over half considered short to very short.

Corn silking or beyond reached 87%, 12 days ahead of the previous year and 3 days ahead of the 5-year average. Corn in the dough stage reached 23%, 10 days ahead of the previous year and 4 days ahead of the average. Corn condition rated 77% good to excellent. Soybeans blooming reached 85%, just over 2 weeks ahead of last year and 6 days ahead of average. Soybeans setting pods reached 50%, just over 2 weeks ahead of last year and 5 days ahead of average. Soybean condition rated 76% good to excellent. Oats turning color reached 95%, 4 days ahead of last year and 1 day ahead of the average. Oats harvested for grain reached 56%, 1 week ahead of last year and 2 days ahead of the average. Oat condition rated 73% good to excellent.

Alfalfa hay second cutting reached 84%, 8 days ahead of last year and 2 days ahead of the average. Hay condition rated 69% good to excellent. Pasture condition rated 51% good to excellent. Some pastures are going dormant due to lack of adequate rain.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Warmer than normal conditions were reported in Iowa’s western half while near to slightly cooler temperatures were observed across parts of eastern Iowa over the reporting period. The statewide average temperature was 74.9 degrees, 1.0 degree above normal. Scattered showers and thunderstorms brought measurable rain across much of the state, though some stations missed out. Overall, drier than normal conditions were observed statewide with departures between 0.50 inch to one inch.

Showers and thunderstorms continued to move through southern Iowa over the late morning hours of Sunday (19th). Some storms turned severe as they pushed through Henry and Des Moines counties, where multiple incidents of severe straight-line winds were reported. Skies cleared in the afternoon as temperatures remained seasonal, generally in the low to mid-80s. Clouds increased overnight into Monday (20th) as a small disturbance pushed into southwestern Iowa. Rainfall reported at 7:00 am was highest in Iowa’s southern corners; a gauge in Sidney (Fremont County) observed 1.14 inches while New London (Henry County) reported 1.12 inches. Rain amounts along the southern half of the Iowa-Nebraska border were around a few tenths of an inch. The system continued over the state with some lingering showers across eastern Iowa. Much of Iowa’s southern two-thirds reported measurable totals with the southwest accumulating between 0.25 inch to 0.75 inch; amounts tapered off to under 0.20 inch farther north and east. Morning lows on Tuesday (21st) ranged from the low 60s north to low 70s in the southeast. Scattered thundershowers popped up through the day in advance of a cold front that swept across Iowa. Daytime highs remained pleasant and a few degrees below normal, generally in the upper 70s and low 80s; western Iowa reported some mid-80s with the statewide average high of 81 degrees, three degrees below normal. Much of the state reported rainfall amounts between 0.20 inch to 0.50 inch with several gauges in Muscatine and Scott counties observing over an inch; the statewide average total was 0.21 inch.

Wednesday (22nd) morning was cooler than average behind the front with clear skies and northwesterly winds. Temperatures ranged from the mid-50s to mid-60s with a statewide average low of 60 degrees, four degrees below normal. Partly to mostly sunny skies and seasonal afternoon temperatures produced a pleasant day statewide. Clouds increased in western Iowa early Thursday (23rd) as spotty thunderstorms moved into west-central Iowa in the early afternoon. Rain totals were typically under 0.25 inch though there were pockets of higher amounts where thunderstorms persisted; Kinsley (Plymouth County) reported 0.75 inch. Afternoon temperatures stayed in the low to mid-80s under sunny skies and a southerly wind. Muggy conditions returned for the end of the week as highs on Friday (24th) pushed into the upper 80s and low 90s. Overnight lows did not fall much, remaining in the upper 60s to mid-70s with the average low of 70 degrees, six degrees above normal. Showers skirted the Iowa-Minnesota border through Saturday (25th) as hot conditions persisted. Heat indices reached into the triple digits with partly sunny skies and gusty southerly winds. A second system entered northwest Iowa on Sunday (26th) morning with scattered thunderstorms. Totals at 7:00 am ranged from 0.01 inch at Sioux City Airport (Woodbury County) to 0.38 inch in Swea City (Kossuth County).

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from no accumulation at stations in northeastern Iowa to 2.25 inches in New London (Henry County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.37 inch while the normal is 0.98 inch. Perry (Dallas County) reported the week’s high temperature of 96 degrees on the 24th, 11 degrees above normal. Fayette (Fayette County) reported the week’s low temperature of 51 degrees on the 23rd, 10 degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition 

Week of July 13 – July 19, 2020

“Portions of Southern Iowa received some much-needed rainfall over the last several days though Western Iowa missed out on much of the moisture,” said Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig as he released the weekly crop progress and condition report from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service.  “The heat also turned up across Iowa, with heat indexes hitting the triple digits. Temperatures look moderate this week, with additional chances of rain.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Progress

Although some areas of the State received over 3.0 inches of rain, statewide Iowa farmers had 5.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 19, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Fieldwork activities included spraying, harvesting hay and grain movement.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 9% very short, 20% short, 69% adequate and 2% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 6% very short, 19% short, 73% adequate and 2% surplus.

Corn silking or beyond reached 69%, 9 days ahead of the previous year and 3 days ahead of the 5-year average. Corn in the dough stage reached 6%, 8 days ahead of the previous year and 4 days ahead of the 5-year average. Corn condition rated 80% good to excellent. Soybeans blooming reached 74%, 2 weeks ahead of last year and 5 days ahead of average. Soybeans setting pods reached 29%, just over 2 weeks ahead of last year and 4 days ahead of average. Soybean condition rated 79% good to excellent. Oats turning color reached 90%, 8 days ahead of last year and 4 days ahead of the average. Oats harvested for grain reached 24%, 5 days ahead of last year but 1 day behind the average. Oat condition rated 81% good to excellent.

Alfalfa hay second cutting reached 76%, 9 days ahead of last year and 4 days ahead of the average. Hay condition rated 68% good to excellent. Pasture condition rated 56% good to excellent. Heat stress and increased insect populations continue to affect livestock.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

A combination of unseasonably cool and warm days during the reporting period led to near normal temperatures across Iowa. The statewide average temperature was 74.6 degrees, 0.7 degrees below normal. While above average rain was reported in Iowa’s southern one-third, dryness persisted over the rest of the state, near an inch below average. West-central Iowa continued to experience the driest conditions with precipitation deficits continuing to accumulate.

Partly to mostly sunny skies persisted through Sunday (12th) as a high-pressure center sat over the Midwest. Daytime temperatures remained seasonal, in the low to mid-80s, with light northerly winds. Overnight lows reported on Monday (13th) dipped into the low 60s under starry skies and light, variable winds. With some mid-level clouds moving over parts of Iowa, highs reached into
the mid-80s north to upper 80s south. Southerly winds were also gusty in western Iowa as the next weather system approached; cloud cover increased in northwestern Iowa as a weak cold front brought showers and thunderstorms into the early morning hours of Tuesday (14th). The front swept across the state as highs stayed in the 80s; temperatures remained in the low 70s in northwestern Iowa where clouds and rain were present. With warm and humid conditions in the state’s eastern half, strong thunderstorms fired in the late afternoon and sped east and southeast through the evening. Some storms in central Iowa turned severe with several reports of straight-line winds; widespread crop damage was observed around Sandyville (Marion County). There were also a few severe hail reports with two-inch diameter hail in Grimes (Polk County). A secondary low-pressure system moving from Kansas into Missouri brought additional thunderstorms across southern Iowa with locally heavy rainfall.

The system persisted through Wednesday (15th) before pushing out of eastern Iowa during the evening hours. Highs behind the front were unseasonably cool, from low 70s in southeast Iowa to upper 70s in northwest Iowa; the statewide average high was 77 degrees, eight degrees below normal. Rain totals showed many of Iowa’s stations receiving measurable rainfall. Gauges across Iowa’s southern one-third reported widespread totals between 0.50 inch to over three inches. More than 100 stations observed an inch or more with locally heavier amounts in south-central Iowa; Creston (Union County) observed 3.08 inches while Ackworth (Warren County) reported 3.53 inches. The statewide average total was 0.72 inch with some stations in northwestern Iowa reporting no measurable rainfall. Morning lows on Thursday (16th) were well below average as a cooler air mass sat over the Midwest. Temperatures were in the upper 40s across north-central Iowa, gradually warming into the 50s farther south. The statewide average low was 56 degrees, six degrees cooler than normal. With high pressure and southerly winds, daytime temperatures on Friday (17th) rebounded into the upper 80s and low 90s. Spotty showers popped up in northwest and south central Iowa, though most of the state stayed dry. Another cold front pushed through Iowa during the day on Saturday (18th) bringing light to moderate rain across a southwest to northeast swath of Iowa. Hot and very muggy conditions were observed with highs pushing into the upper 80s to mid-90s; heat indices were also in the triple digits. Thunderstorms lingered in southeastern Iowa into Sunday (19th) as 24-hour reports generally showed a few tenths of an inch with locally heavier totals in the northeast.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from no accumulation at multiple stations in western Iowa to 3.56 inches at Ackworth 2 SW. The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.75 inch while the normal is 1.02 inches. Little Sioux 2NW (Harrison County) reported the week’s high temperature of 98 degrees on the 18th, 12 degrees above normal. Mason City (Cerro Gordo County) reported the week’s low temperature of 44 degrees on the 16th, 17 degrees below normal. This reading ties with 1912 as the station’s record low temperature for the date.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition 

Week of July 6 – July 12, 2020

While some areas of the state got rain over the past week, areas of western and west central Iowa missed out and are experiencing moisture stress in crops and pastures. Some areas also experienced localized hail events over the weekend,” said Secretary Naig. “Short-term forecasts favor continued warm temperatures as corn pollination is underway in many areas of the state.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Progress

In spite of spotty showers, Iowa farmers had 5.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 12, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Fieldwork activities included spraying and harvesting hay.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 5% very short, 22% short, 70% adequate and 3% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 3% very short, 17% short, 78% adequate and 2% surplus.

Corn silking or beyond reached 35%, 8 days ahead of the previous year and 2 days ahead of the 5-year average. There were scattered reports of corn reaching the dough stage. Corn condition rated 83% good to excellent. Soybean blooming reached 58%, 2 weeks ahead of last year and 6 days ahead of average. Soybeans setting pods reached 10%, 2 weeks ahead of last year and 2 days ahead of average. Soybean condition rated 83% good to excellent. Oats turning color reached 73%, 8 days ahead of last year and 3 days ahead of the average. There were reports of some oats being harvested for grain. Oat condition rated 86% good to excellent.

Alfalfa hay second cutting reached 61%, 11 days ahead of last year and 4 days ahead of the average. Hay condition rated 76 % good to excellent. Pasture condition rated 65% good to excellent. There were reports of heat stress and increased insect populations affecting livestock.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Warmth persisted across the state during the reporting period with positive departures of up to five degrees. The statewide average temperature was 77.8 degrees, 3.3 degrees above normal. Several days during the period were also active with multiple waves of showers and thunderstorms, especially in northeastern Iowa. Below average totals of over an inch were reported in the driest portion of the state, namely west-central Iowa, while parts of eastern Iowa reported above-average totals.

Hazy conditions persisted through the late morning hours on Sunday (5th) as southerly winds and partly sunny skies pushed afternoon temperatures into the upper 80s. Overnight lows into Monday (6th) morning remained warmer than average, generally in the upper 60s and low 70s, as a complex of thunderstorms pushed into northwest Iowa. The system did not hold together for a long duration and dissipated over north-central Iowa during the early afternoon. Hot conditions again prevailed with highs in the upper 80s and low 90s with another line of storms pushing into western Iowa in the evening hours. Morning totals at 7:00 am on Tuesday (7th) from stations in the northwest corner of Iowa show amounts ranging from 0.10 inch at Remsen (Plymouth County) to 1.26 inches at a gauge in Sioux City (Woodbury County); rainfall was generally a few tenths of an inch at most stations. Scattered thunderstorms, some severe, formed across eastern Iowa during the afternoon hours with multiple reports of high wind gusts and tree damage. Radial damage to crops and trees in Quasqueton (Buchanan County) was likely a result of strong straight-line microburst winds; a 90-mph wind gust was also observed near Mount Joy (Scott County). The storms lingered into the late-night hours and cleared eastern Iowa early Wednesday (8th) morning. Measurable rain was reported east of a line from the Quad Cities to Waterloo (Black Hawk County); Davenport Municipal Airport (Scott County) reported 1.24 inches with Dubuque (Dubuque County) observing 0.63 inch. Statewide morning lows, in the upper 60s and low 70s, were up to 10 degrees warmer than normal; Fort Madison (Lee County) reported 75 degrees while the statewide average was 70 degrees, seven degrees above normal. With the warm start and sunny skies, highs were able to rise into the upper 90s across portions of south-central Iowa, making it the warmest day of the year so far. High dewpoints pushed heat indices into the triple digits; the statewide average high was 92 degrees, seven degrees above normal.

Balmy conditions on Thursday (9th) helped fire a line of severe thunderstorms through the evening hours, leading to a widespread severe wind event across northeastern Iowa. Heavy rain from the stronger storms was also reported in northern and eastern Iowa. Over 70 stations reported at least one inch with the statewide average rainfall at 0.51 inch. Swisher (Johnson County) observed
2.90 inches and was one of over 20 stations to report over two inches of rainfall. Friday (10th) was generally dry across a majority of Iowa with highs ranging from the low 80s north to low 90s south. A complex of thunderstorms pushed into western Iowa overnight into Saturday (11th) along an existing outflow boundary; additional storms fired in extreme northeast Iowa. Unstable conditions lead to an active weather day across Iowa’s eastern half. Strong thunderstorms moved through the eastern one-third of the state through the afternoon as another line of severe thunderstorms marched from north-central Iowa into the southeastern corner. There were widespread reports of severe straight-line winds and large hail on the order of 1.25 to 2.00 inches again causing additional crop damage. Rainfall reported at 7:00 am on Sunday (12th) showed totals in the range of 0.25 inch to 0.75 inch in Iowa’s northeastern one-third; St. Ansgar (Mitchell County) observed 1.88 inches.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from no accumulation at multiple stations in southern Iowa to 3.68 inches in Anamosa (Jones County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.92 inch while the normal is 1.05 inches. Osceola (Clarke County) and Perry (Dallas County) reported the week’s high temperature of 97 degrees on the 8th, on average 11 degrees above normal. Cedar Rapids No. 1 (Linn County) reported the week’s low temperature of 54 degrees on the 12th, 11 degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition 

Week of June 29 – July 5, 2020

On Monday, July 6, Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented on the weekly Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service.

“Another week of above normal temperatures across the state continued the recent trend of rapid crop development. Some corn is tasseling across Iowa, and sweet corn stands have started to pop up,” said Secretary Naig. “Short-term forecasts favor warm temperatures with dry weather across much of the state. Some pockets of the state are already experiencing moisture stress to crops and pastures, although much of Iowa continues to have ample subsoil moisture.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Progress

Little to no precipitation for much of Iowa allowed farmers 6.0 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 5, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Fieldwork activities included applying fertilizer, spraying, harvesting hay, and hauling grain.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 3% very short, 19% short, 76% adequate, and 2% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 2% very short, 14% short, 81% adequate, and 3% surplus.

There were reports of corn silking across much of the State with an average of 5%, almost 1 week ahead of the previous year but 2 days behind the 5-year average. Corn condition rated 85% good to excellent. Soybean blooming reached 37%, almost 2 weeks ahead of last year and 6 days ahead of average. There were scattered reports of soybeans beginning to set pods. Soybean condition rated 84% good to excellent. Oats headed progressed to 94%, 5 days ahead of last year. Oats turning color reached 36%, 4 days ahead of last year but 2 days behind the average. Oat condition rated 85% good to excellent.

Alfalfa hay second cutting reached 38%, 11 days ahead of last year and 2 days ahead of the average. Hay condition rated 77% good to excellent. Pasture condition rated 69% good to excellent. There were reports of heat stress affecting cattle as well as continuing issues of pinkeye for cow/calf producers.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Unseasonably warm and dry conditions persisted through the end of June into early July across the majority of Iowa. The warmest conditions were found in eastern Iowa with positive departures of up to six degrees. The statewide average temperature was 77.4 degrees, 4.3 degrees above normal. Measurable rain was reported across most of the state, though only extreme southeast Iowa reported above normal totals; portions of north-central Iowa reported deficits of up to an inch.

Showers and thunderstorms continued to push through Iowa into Sunday (28th) afternoon with isolated thundershowers popping up into the evening hours. Daytime highs were in the 80s across the state with a southerly wind. Clouds cleared overnight into Monday (29th) with temperatures remaining in the low to mid-70s. Rain totals reported at 7:00 am for the previous 24-hour period showed widespread rainfall between 0.10 inch to 0.25 inch. Heavier pockets of rain were reported in southeastern Iowa, where Keokuk Lock and Dam (Lee County) observed 0.81 inch. Cloud cover increased across eastern Iowa through the daytime hours with mid to upper 80s reported across much of the state. A small disturbance over northeastern Missouri spun several lines of slow-moving showers and thunderstorms over southeastern Iowa just after midnight on Tuesday (30th). The system lingered for most of the day with totals ranging from 0.08 inch at Burlington Municipal Airport (Des Moines County) to 1.26 inches at Fort Madison (Lee County). High temperatures were held in the upper 70s where cloud cover was present with mid to upper 80s observed in northern and western Iowa. A line of strong thunderstorms entered western Iowa early on Wednesday (1st) bringing measurable rain across much of the state’s western one-third. A secondary, narrow band of thunderstorms popped up across southeastern Iowa ahead of the primary system, bringing locally heavy rain before dissipating. Rain totals were highest in both the southwest and southeast corners with Red Oak (Montgomery County) observing 1.60 inches while Ottumwa Industrial Airport (Wapello County) reported 2.42 inches; the statewide average rainfall was 0.21 inch.

The final days of the week were relatively hot and dry with partly cloudy conditions persisting through Thursday (2nd). Daytime highs reached into the upper 80s with some readings in the 90s. Overnight lows remained in the upper 60s and low 70s, up to 10 degrees warmer at some stations with the statewide average at 67 degrees, five degrees above normal. A few isolated thunderstorms popped up over Lee and Van Buren counties during the morning hours which led to flash flood warnings. Hot conditions continued on Friday (3rd) with highs peaking in the upper 80s and low 90s. The statewide average temperature was 89 degrees, four degrees warmer than normal. Warm temperatures persisted through Saturday (4th) with a few thundershowers firing in northern and eastern Iowa. Winds were generally light and variable with puffy cumulus clouds moving across the sky. Independence Day fireworks were enjoyed under muggy conditions as a near full moon rose. Overnight lows into Sunday (5th) varied from the upper 60s to low 70s with hazy and degraded air quality conditions reported from excess particulates in the lower atmosphere.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from no accumulation at multiple stations in north-central Iowa to 3.37 inches at Keokuk Lock and Dam (Lee County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.35 inch while the normal is 1.09 inches. Bellevue Lock and Dam (Jackson County) reported the week’s high temperature of 94 degrees on the 3rd, nine degrees above normal. Mapleton (Monona County) reported the week’s low temperature of 61 degrees on the 4th, one degree below normal.

Wednesday, July 1, 2020

Naig: USMCA is a Welcome New
Chapter for Trade

 Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig issued the following statement on Wednesday, July 1, as the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement’s (USMCA) entry into force marked the beginning of a historic new chapter for North American trade.

“Today, Iowa farmers gain greater access to our two largest export markets: Canada and Mexico,” said Secretary Naig. “Because of the Trump administration’s efforts to renegotiate unbalanced trade agreements, our producers will see significant improvements to rules of origin and intellectual property protections, and new opportunities with expanded market access. USMCA’s entry into force marks the beginning of a welcome new chapter for North American trade.”

USMCA replaces the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Under USMCA, Iowa producers will have more market access for their food and agricultural products. USMCA also improves intellectual property and labor protections and includes provisions for biotechnologies, including gene editing. Iowa exports more than $10.3 billion in agricultural products to Canada and Mexico each year, which supports 86,500 Iowa jobs, according to the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition 

Week of June 22 – June 28, 2020

On Monday, Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Continued wide variation in precipitation across the state brought large amounts of rain in some areas and continued shortages in others,” said Sec. Naig. “Overall, Iowa crops are progressing rapidly with warm temperatures for the month of June, and continued warm temperatures in the near-term forecast.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Progress

Precipitation limited Iowa farmers to 4.5 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending June 28, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Northeast Iowa saw the highest rainfall and some severe weather. Fieldwork activities included applying fertilizer, spraying, harvesting hay, and hauling grain.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 2% very short, 9% short, 81% adequate, and 8% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 1% very short, 7% short, 85% adequate, and 7% surplus. There were scattered reports of corn beginning to silk in the State. Corn condition rated 85% good to excellent. Soybean emergence reached 98%, over 2 weeks ahead of last year and 5 days ahead of the 5- year average. Soybean blooming reached 16%, almost 2 weeks ahead of last year and 5 days ahead of average. Soybean condition rated 83% good to excellent. Oats headed progressed to 86%, 6 days ahead of last year. Oat condition rated 82% good to excellent.

Ninety-seven percent of the first cutting of alfalfa hay has been completed. Alfalfa hay second cutting reached 9%, 1 week ahead of last year but 4 days behind the average. Hay condition rated 75% good to excellent. Pasture condition rated 69% good to excellent. Some cow/calf operations reported pinkeye issues with insect pressure also mentioned.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

In a shift from recent weeks, cooler than normal temperatures were felt across much of Iowa with up to three degrees below average departures in eastern Iowa. The statewide average temperature was 71.2 degrees, 1.6 degrees below normal. A continued active storm track brought thunderstorms through Iowa over several days with above-average rainfall reported across eastern Iowa. Positive departures of up to 3.00 inches were found in the northeast, while western Iowa observed deficits of up to an inch.

Thunderstorms began popping up across eastern Iowa during the afternoon on Sunday (21st) ahead of a strong disturbance that produced some severe thunderstorms across northern Iowa over the evening hours. There were several reports of one-inch hail and severe straight-line winds in excess of 60 mph; Sheldon (O’Brien County) reported a 62 mph wind gust. Further development occurred in the early morning hours as the complex over eastern Iowa consolidated, bringing locally heavy downpours and strong wind gusts. Additional storms, some severe, formed in southern and central Iowa through Monday (22nd) morning and moved east as another round fired in west-central Iowa. Though daytime highs remained in the low to mid-70s, muggy conditions supported thunderstorm activity. A cold front finally cleared Iowa overnight into Tuesday (23rd) with two-day rain totals at 7 a.m. showing the highest amounts in eastern Iowa, where flash flood warnings were in place. All Iowa stations reported measurable rainfall with much of Iowa’s northeast quadrant observing totals above 1.50 inches. Nearly 70 stations reported totals over 2.00 inches with a statewide average rainfall of 1.17 inches; Clutier (Tama County) reported 5.17 inches. Partly cloudy skies and northwesterly winds remained through the day with highs in the upper 70s southwest to upper 60s northeast.

Skies cleared into early Wednesday (24th) though partly cloudy conditions were reported across central Iowa through the afternoon and evening hours with a light, variable wind. Isolated thundershowers formed in eastern Iowa on the backside of a low-pressure center. Only a handful of stations reported rain with Fayette (Fayette County) observing 0.60 inch. Clear skies and southerly winds helped push temperatures into the mid to upper 80s on Thursday (25th). Overnight lows dropped into the low 70s across southern Iowa while clouds and thunderstorms pushed through northern Iowa, keeping temperatures in the mid to upper 60s. Early on Friday (26th), waves of showers and thunderstorms propagated across the state ahead of a low-pressure center. Some severe storms moved through eastern Iowa into the evening hours, while overnight into Saturday (27th) a sluggish boundary draped over southern Iowa re-fired slow-moving storms.

Higher rainfall totals were reported in southeastern Iowa with totals generally between a few tenths of an inch to over two inches; Washington (Washington County) observed 2.21 inches. High temperatures peaked into the low to mid-80s with spotty thunderstorms across east-central Iowa. Overnight lows remained in the mid to upper 60s as an arc of thunderstorms pushed into southwestern Iowa with a trailing shield of showers. Totals reported at 7 a.m. on Sunday (28th) across Iowa’s southern half ranged from a few tenths in the southwest tailing off farther east. Williamsburg (Iowa County) reported 0.93 inch after multiple storms passed over the station.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged 0.02 inch at Atlantic Municipal Airport (Cass County) to 5.40 inches at Clutier and Elkader (Clayton County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 1.61 inches while the normal is 1.17 inches. Keokuk Lock and Dam (Lee County) reported the week’s high temperature of 92 degrees on the 26th, six degrees above normal. Multiple stations reported the week’s low temperature of 50 degrees on the 24th, on average 10 degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of June 15 – Jun 21, 2020

 On Monday, June 22, Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Widely variable rainfall amounts across the state over the past week brought excess moisture to areas of northern and eastern Iowa, while parts of west-central and southwest Iowa remain drier than normal,” said Secretary Naig. “Overall above average temperatures continue to allow for rapid crop development.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Progress

Statewide there were 4.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending June 21, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. There were several reports farmers found it difficult to spray their crops due to constant winds during the week. Fieldwork activities also included finishing up planting, harvesting hay and hauling grain.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 1% very short, 7% short, 83% adequate and 9% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 1% very short, 6% short, 86% adequate, and 7% surplus.

There were only a few reports of corn beginning to silk in parts of the State. Corn condition rated 85% good to excellent. Soybean emergence reached 96%, 16 days ahead of last year, and 1 week ahead of the 5-year average. Soybean condition rated 84% good to excellent. Oats headed progressed to 71%, 1 week ahead of last year but 1 day behind average. Oat condition rated 83% good to excellent.

Ninety-three percent of the first cutting of alfalfa hay has been completed. A few farmers have begun their second cutting of alfalfa. Hay condition rated 75% good to excellent. Pasture condition rated 70% good to excellent. No livestock issues were reported for the week.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Unseasonably warm conditions persisted across western Iowa with near-normal temperatures reported across the state’s eastern one-third. The statewide average temperature was 72.9 degrees, 2.0 degrees above normal. Showers and thunderstorms were reported on multiple days during the reporting period, though dryness persisted across much of Iowa. Southwestern Iowa reported rainfall deficits between 0.50-1.00 inch while sections of north-central Iowa observed totals over 1.50 inches above normal.

Gusty winds out of the southeast continued through Sunday (14th) under sunny skies and pleasant temperatures. Afternoon highs ranged from the mid-80s west to upper 70s east. Cloudless conditions persisted overnight and through Monday (15th) as southerly winds continued to gust, especially across northwestern Iowa. High temperatures were again warmer in western Iowa, generally in the upper 80s with some 90-degree readings; upper 70s and low 80s were observed in eastern Iowa. Overnight lows into Tuesday (16th) remained in the upper 60s and low 70s across the western three-quarters of Iowa with positive departures of up to 15 degrees; Rock Rapids (Lyon County) reported a low of 72 degrees. In stark contrast and on the opposite corner of Iowa, Burlington Municipal Airport (Des Moines County) reported a low of 54 degrees, nine degrees below average. Wednesday (17th) was another sunny day with breezy southerly winds which helped push afternoon highs into the mid to upper 80s. The statewide average high was 86 degrees, four degrees above normal. Overnight lows into Thursday (18th) varied from low 60s in the east to low 70s west as light rain was reported in extreme northwest Iowa. Clouds began to increase across western Iowa as a low-pressure center pushed into the state. Widespread rain was reported as showers and thunderstorms fired along a cold front during the afternoon hours. Some storms were strong to severe with a brief spin-up tornado reported in Lakota (Kossuth County). Measurable rain was reported over most of Iowa with more than 60 stations reporting over an inch. A rain gauge in Missouri Valley (Harrison County) reported 3.62 inches with a statewide average of 0.52 inches.

The system continued into eastern Iowa on Friday (19th) leaving behind rainfall in the state’s eastern quarter. The heaviest totals were found in northeastern and southeastern Iowa. Lansing (Allamakee County) reported 3.46 inches while Keosauqua (Van Buren County) observed 3.04 inches. Cloudy conditions continued with highs remaining in the 70s and overnight lows into Saturday (20th) generally in the mid 60s. Spotty thundershowers were also reported across eastern Iowa as clouds began to clear over western Iowa. Given the variable conditions, high temperatures ranged from low 70s north to low 80s south. Overnight lows dipped into the low to mid-60s with a light southerly wind as some stronger storms moved into northwestern Iowa. Measurable rain was reported across northern and eastern Iowa at 7:00 am on Sunday (21st), generally under a few tenths of an inch with totals tailing off moving west; Washington (Washington County) reported 0.52 inch.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged 0.04 inch in Perry (Dallas County) to 4.27 inches in Grundy Center (Grundy County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 1.08 inches while the normal is 1.17 inches. Little Sioux (Harrison County) reported the week’s high temperature of 94 degrees on the 15th, 12 degrees above normal. Multiple stations in northeastern Iowa reported the week’s low temperature of 51 degrees on the 15th, on average eight degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of June 8 – Jun 14, 2020

On Monday, Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Iowa has experienced widely variable weather conditions over the past week. Some areas picked up large amounts of rain thanks to the remnants of Tropical Storm Cristobal while other parts of the state saw smaller amounts of precipitation,” said Secretary Naig. “Crops continue to progress quickly with warmer temperatures expected throughout the week.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Progress

While some areas of Iowa saw significant precipitation, statewide there were 4.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending June 14, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Fieldwork activities included planting, harvesting hay, spraying, and applying nitrogen.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 1% very short, 6% short, 85% adequate, and 8% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0% very short, 4% short, 87% adequate, and 9% surplus.

Virtually all of the corn crop has emerged. Corn condition rated 83% good to excellent. Although soybeans remain to be planted in southwest Iowa, farmers in the rest of the state have nearly all completed planting. Emergence reached 93%, almost 3 weeks ahead of last year and 9 days ahead of average. Soybean condition rated 82% good to excellent. Oats headed progressed to 42%, 3 days ahead of last year but 2 days behind average. Oat condition rated 83% good to excellent.

One-quarter of the first cutting of alfalfa hay was completed during the week ending June 14, 2020, reaching 79 percent complete. Only Southwest Iowa producers have been unable to complete at least three-quarters of their first cutting of alfalfa hay. Hay condition rated 75% good to excellent. Pasture condition remains at 70% good to excellent. Movement of grain from farm to facilities was noted. No major livestock issues were reported for the week.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Warmer than normal conditions continued into the second week of June with the warmest temperatures reported in western Iowa. Near normal conditions were reported in parts of eastern Iowa. The statewide average temperature was 70.6 degrees, 1.1 degrees above normal. Two strong storm systems brought heavy rain across western Iowa and especially over eastern Iowa, where a tropical system brought over three inches of above-average rainfall. Drier than normal conditions were found across north-central Iowa where departures, on the order of 0.50 inch to 1.00 inch below average, were observed.

Sunday (7th) was windy, hot, and sunny with highs reaching into the mid to upper 90s across much of Iowa. Skies remained clear overnight into Monday (8th) with morning lows ranging from the upper 60s east to mid-70s west; the statewide average low was 69 degrees, 12 degrees above normal. Temperatures again topped out in the 90s as winds gradually shifted from the east across southeastern Iowa in advance of the remnants of Tropical Storm Cristobal. The system, now classified as a tropical depression, entered Iowa from northeastern Missouri in the early morning hours on Tuesday (9th). Cristobal became only the second tropical system on record to move through Iowa with the first occurrence happening on September 11th, 1900. While the depression was fast-moving and cleared the state just after 9:00 pm, very heavy rain was reported across eastern Iowa through the day. Behind Cristobal, a strong low-pressure system and attendant cold front pushed through western Iowa and brought additional rain to much of the state. The mid-latitude system moved out of Iowa just after noon on Wednesday (10th). Two-day rain totals showed over 200 NWS coop stations and CoCoRaHS rain gauges reporting at least an inch with all Iowa stations observing measurable totals. Ten gauges across a narrow south-to-north swath in eastern Iowa observed over four inches; Vinton (Benton County) reported 4.11 inches while Stanley (Buchannan County) observed 4.65 inches. Storm totals in western Iowa were generally above 0.50 inch with the statewide average total at 1.53 inches. Windy and cooler conditions built-in behind the systems as cloud cover cleared into the afternoon hours.

A brisk northwest wind and clear skies held temperatures in the 70s, with overnight lows into Thursday (11th) in the mid to upper 50s. Westerly winds and sunny skies persisted through the day with high temperatures in the upper 70s and low 80s. Friday (12th) morning lows across southern Iowa were in the low 60s while the rest of Iowa reported mid to upper 50s. Clear and pleasant conditions continued into Saturday (13th) across a majority of the state. Highs ranged from the upper 80s in southwestern Iowa to upper 60s in eastern Iowa, where clouds and isolated rain showers were found into the evening hours. Only a handful of stations reported measurable totals at 7:00 am on Sunday (14th) with 0.04 inch reported in Fayette County to a trace in Cedar Rapids (Linn County).

Weekly precipitation totals ranged 0.07 inch in Humboldt (Humboldt County) to 5.64 inches at Oelwein 1E (Fayette County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 1.78 inches while the normal is 1.19 inches. Spencer Municipal Airport (Clay County) reported the week’s high temperature of 98 degrees on the 8th, 19 degrees above normal. Elkader (Clayton County) reported the week’s low temperature of 47 degrees on the 12th, seven degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of June 1 – Jun 7, 2020

 Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Above normal temperatures across much of the state last week allowed for rapid crop development,” said Secretary Naig. “Some pockets of dryness are popping up across parts of Iowa. Those areas could see some relief this week as the remnants of Tropical Storm Cristobal brings chances of rain.

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Progress

Drier weather allowed Iowa farmers 5.1 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending June 7, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Weather conditions were ideal for farmers to cut hay across much of the state.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0% very short, 4% short, 85% adequate, and 11% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0% very short, 3% short, 87% adequate, and 10% surplus.

Corn planting was virtually complete with emergence at 97%, over 2 weeks ahead of last year, and 10 days ahead of the 5-year average. Corn condition rated 85% good to excellent. The soybean crop moved to 97% planted, 3 weeks ahead of last year, and 12 days ahead of average. Emergence reached 87%, 10 days ahead of average. Soybean condition rated 82% good to excellent. Oats headed progressed to 18%, 2 days ahead of last year but 5 days behind average. Oat condition rated 81% good to excellent.

Dry weather allowed over one-third of the first cutting of alfalfa hay to be completed during the week ending June 7, 2020, reaching 54 percent complete. Only southwest and south-central Iowa producers were unable to complete at least one-third of the first cutting of alfalfa hay during the week. Hay condition rated 75% good to excellent. Pasture condition improved to 70% good to excellent. There was little stress on livestock reported.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Meteorological summer began on the first of June, and on cue, unseasonable warmth returned to Iowa. Positive temperature departures were generally in the range of six to 10 degrees, with up to 12 degrees reported across western Iowa. The statewide average temperature was 76.2 degrees, 9.4 degrees above normal. Drier conditions were also reported across Iowa’s southwestern two-thirds on the order of 1.00 to 2.00 inches below normal. Pockets of above-average rainfall were reported in northeast Iowa.

Clouds cleared west to east during the afternoon hours on Sunday (31st) with blustery southerly winds. Daytime highs reached into the low to mid-70s. Clouds began to increase as a warm front lifted through the state into Monday (1st) morning. Lows remained in the 60s with light to moderate rain showers reported across portions of the state. Heavier rain fell across northern Iowa, especially Worth through Howard counties, where Elma reported 0.92 inches. Amounts quickly tapered off to a few tenths of inch in the two immediate southwest counties. Sunny skies and a strong southwesterly wind boosted highs into the low 90s across northwestern Iowa while temperatures in the southeast remained in the 80s. Overnight temperatures remained warmer than average, in the upper 60s and low 70s, under starry skies. Tuesday (2nd) was the warmest day of the year so far, with daytime highs in the mid to upper 90s across a majority of Iowa. The hottest conditions were found in northwestern Iowa, where some stations reported triple-digit heat indices. Multiple stations broke their high temperatures for the date with the statewide average high of 92 degrees, 15 degrees above normal. Showers and some severe thunderstorms began to fire along a strong frontal boundary along the Iowa-Minnesota border during the evening hours. A few isolated severe thunderstorms re-fired across southwestern and central Iowa in the early morning hours of Wednesday (3rd). The system moved southeast through Iowa and cleared the state just before noon. Rain totals were highest in eastern Iowa where multiple stations reported totals over an inch with lighter amounts farther west; Davenport Municipal Airport (Scott County) reported 1.91 inches.

Thursday (4th) was another active weather day as an initial line of thunderstorms popped up in the evening across eastern Iowa. Many of the storms turned severe and produced multiple reports of hail and straight-line winds. Locally heavy downpours were also observed. A second round of strong thunderstorms moved into north-central and eastern Iowa overnight into Friday (5th). Some thunderstorms turned severe and produced over 40 reports of severe straight-line winds as they sped through central Iowa. Wind gusts of up to 70 mph were observed in multiple counties with widespread damage to trees. Measurable rain was reported across Iowa’s northeastern three-quarters in the range of 0.25 inch to over 1.00 inch. Storm Lake (Buena Vista County) reported 1.82 inches with a statewide average of 0.34 inch. Conditions quieted down through the rest of the day with mostly sunny skies and highs in the mid-80s. A small complex of showers and thunderstorms developed in north-central Iowa just before midnight and pushed east into Saturday (6th) morning. Where rain fell, totals were generally under a few tenths of an inch, though Primghar (O’Brien) reported 0.40 inch. Daytime highs were in the low 80s north to upper 80s south. Isolated showers and thunderstorms were reported across parts of Iowa into the evening hours, with a more concentrated line forming across northeastern Iowa into early Sunday (7th) morning. Rain totals were under 0.10 inch with Decorah (Winneshiek County) observing 0.08 inch.

Weekly rain totals ranged from no accumulation at multiple western stations to 1.98 inches in Dakota City (Humboldt County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.60 inches while the normal is 1.17 inches. Spencer Municipal Airport (Clay County) reported the week’s high temperature of 100 degrees on the 2nd, 23 degrees above normal. Fayette (Fayette County) reported the week’s low temperature of 44 degrees on the 1st, eight degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of May 25 – May 31, 2020

On Monday, June 1, Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service.
“Planting across the state is nearly complete,” said Secretary Naig. “Iowa is expecting warmer temperatures over the next few days. The heat that is expected this week should help move the crop along.”

The weekly report, distributed from April through November, is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Progress

Rain throughout the week resulted in 2.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending May 31, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Warmer temperatures advanced crop development.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 1% very short, 1% short, 78% adequate, and 20% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0% very short, 1% short, 81% adequate, and 18% surplus.

Iowa farmers have planted 98% of the expected corn crop, 2 weeks ahead of last year, and 1 week ahead of the 5-year average. Corn emergence was at 93%, almost 3 weeks ahead of last year and 10 days ahead of the 5-year average. Corn condition improved to 85% good to excellent. The soybean crop moved to 95% planted, 3 weeks ahead of last year, and over 2 weeks ahead of average. Seventy-six percent of the soybean crop has emerged, 3 weeks ahead of last year and 11 days ahead of the 5-year average. Soybean condition rated 81% good to excellent. Ninety-eight percent of the oat crop has emerged with 5% headed. Oat condition rated 83% good to excellent.

The State’s first cutting of alfalfa hay has been 16% completed, 5 days ahead of last year. Hay condition rated 74% good to excellent. Pasture condition improved to 66% good to excellent. There was little stress on livestock although feedlots remain muddy.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

The final week of May was warmer and wetter across much of Iowa as an active storm track brought multiple systems through the state; above-average rain totals were reported at a majority of stations. Near seasonal temperatures were observed across western Iowa with warmer conditions farther east; the statewide average temperature was 66.3 degrees, 2.3 degrees above normal.

A line of strong thunderstorms with heavy rain continued moving through western Iowa into the early afternoon hours of Sunday (24th) before quickly dissipating as it moved into central Iowa. With southerly winds and clearing skies, daytime highs reached into the upper 70s and low 80s, allowing for instability to build in ahead of another disturbance that pushed into southwestern Iowa during the evening; this system produced a few strong thunderstorms along with a wide area of measurable rainfall. Totals reported on Monday (25th) were highest along a swath from southwestern to north-central Iowa with amounts generally at or above 0.50 inch; nearly 30 stations reported totals above an inch with Oakland (Pottawattamie County) reporting 2.42 inches. A southerly flow brought waves of showers and thunderstorms through the day with isolated severe thunderstorms across central Iowa. Johnston (Polk County) reported a brief EF-1 tornado with an estimated peak wind speed of 95 mph. Tuesday (26th) was another active day as a low-pressure center spun into Iowa. Multiple bands of showers and thunderstorms moved through the state with several severe thunderstorms reported during the afternoon. Three weak tornadoes were observed in Dallas, Guthrie, and Wright counties, though no significant damage was reported. Rain totals were highest in western Iowa with a majority of stations across Iowa reporting measurable rainfall; the statewide average was 0.33 inch of rain.

The low exited into Minnesota early on Wednesday (27th) as high temperatures topped out in the 70s under cloudy skies. Another line of showers and thunderstorms crept through the state ahead of a sluggish frontal boundary overnight and through Thursday (28th). Morning lows remained on the warm side, averaging 62 degrees statewide, nine degrees above normal. The front finally pushed out of eastern Iowa overnight as cloud cover thinned. Rain totals were highest in the northeast where Guttenberg Lock and Dam (Clayton County) reported 3.80 inches. General totals from 0.25 inch to 1.00 inch were reported from central to eastern Iowa with another pocket of heavy rainfall reported in southeastern Iowa; Brighton (Washington County) observed 2.25 inches. Friday (29th) was pleasant statewide with northwesterly winds and partly to mostly sunny skies. Daytime temperatures remained in the upper 60s and low 70s. Overnight lows into Saturday (30th) dipped into the low to mid-50s, with upper 40s observed in north-central Iowa. Another weak disturbance brought periods of showers across Iowa’s southwestern quarter through the day. Totals were generally light, though a small band of over one-half inch was reported across a few southwestern counties with Lamoni (Decatur County) reporting 0.60 inch. Amounts quickly tapered off northeast of this band. Morning lows on Sunday (31st) varied across the state with the upper 40s in eastern Iowa under clear skies to upper 50s across western Iowa, where cloud cover was observed.

Weekly rain totals ranged from 0.12 inch in Remsen (Plymouth County) to 4.29 inches in Tripoli (Bremer County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 1.57 inches while the normal is 1.07 inches. Muscatine (Muscatine County) reported the week’s high temperature of 89 degrees on the 25th, 12 degrees above normal. Elkader (Clayton County) and Stanley (Buchanan County) reported the week’s low temperature of 43 degrees on the 30th, on average eight degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of May 18 – May 24, 2020

On Tuesday, May 26, Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“The holiday weekend brought warmer weather and some sun, which helped advance crop development,” said Secretary Naig. “Showers and thunderstorms are forecast for the next few days but I expect farmers will be able to resume fieldwork later this week when more dry weather is expected.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Progress

Rain throughout the week resulted in 2.5 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending May 24, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Below normal temperatures have slowed crop growth.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0% very short, 2% short, 76% adequate, and 22% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 1% very short, 3% short, 79% adequate and 17% surplus.

Iowa farmers have planted 97% of the expected corn crop, 3 weeks ahead of last year, and almost 2 weeks ahead of the 5-year average. Corn emergence was at 82%, an improvement of 20 percentage points from the previous week. The first corn condition rating of the season was 0% very poor, 2% poor, 17% fair, 67% good and 14% excellent. The soybean crop moved to 92% planted, nearly a month ahead of last year, and over 2 weeks ahead of average. Farmers in Southwest Iowa have over 25% of their soybeans left to plant. Fifty-two percent of the soybean crop has emerged, doubling the amount of soybeans that emerged from the previous week. Ninety-five percent of the oat crop has emerged. Oat condition rated 81% good to excellent.

Hay condition rated 73% good to excellent. Pasture condition improved to 66% good to excellent. There was little stress on livestock although feedlots remain muddy.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Under a stagnant atmospheric pattern across the Midwest, Iowa experienced cool and cloudy conditions through much of the reporting period. The persistent cloud cover and sluggish large-scale flow did not allow temperatures to fluctuate significantly between the daytime and nighttime over several days. Temperatures were up to four degrees below normal with the statewide average temperature of 60.7 degrees, 2.6 degrees below normal. Measurable rainfall was also reported statewide, though below-average totals were observed at a majority of stations.

A cut-off low-pressure system continued to spin over northwest Iowa through most of Sunday (17th). The low moved very slow as it lacked the large-scale steering flow to move it out of the region. A lingering band of showers left measurable rain totals across northern and eastern Iowa. Kanawha (Hancock County) reported 1.13 inches while Le Claire Lock and Dam (Scott County) reported 1.17 inches. Totals tailed off to a few tenths of an inch in east-central Iowa. Cloudy and damp conditions held daytime highs in the mid-50s to low 60s west to east. Overnight lows into Monday (18th) did not drop appreciably, remaining in the low 50s under northerly winds and a thick stratus cloud deck. Temperatures through the afternoon topped out in the mid to upper 50s with the statewide average high of 58 degrees, 14 degrees below normal. Similar conditions were reported on Tuesday (19th), though daytime temperatures did reach into the low 60s across much of Iowa. Light easterly winds were reported overnight into Wednesday (20th) with morning temperatures in the low to mid-50s statewide, seasonal for this time of year. Foggy conditions were also reported across southern and western Iowa. As the cloudy day wore on, temperatures remained in the 60s with lower 70s observed in northeastern Iowa.

Winds began to shift to a southeasterly direction into the late-night hours with lows in the mid to upper 50s reported across the state. Daytime highs on Thursday (21st) rose into the low to mid-60s with some peeks of sunshine in western Iowa. A weak disturbance pushed into Iowa bringing light rain to some western stations, though generally under 0.01 inch. Overnight temperatures into Friday (22nd) remained in the mid to upper 50s with low-lying fog under continuing cloudiness. Southeasterly winds helped push daytime temperatures into the upper 60s and low 70s ahead of  slow-spinning low-pressure system along the Kansas-Nebraska border. The system pushed into Iowa during the late-night hours, bringing showers and thunderstorms through Saturday (23rd). Some thunderstorms turned severe across eastern Iowa shortly afternoon. A few weak tornadoes were reported, including one with an EF-1rating in Morse (Johnson County), which caused some minor structural damage on a farm. A secondary line of strong thunderstorms pushed into western Iowa overnight into Sunday (24th) morning, bringing locally heavy rain. Two-day totals reported at 7:00 am were generally at or above 0.20 inch across much of the state with the highest amounts reported in northwest Iowa; Sioux Rapids (Buena Vista County) reported 1.81 inches with the statewide average of 0.51 inch.

Weekly rain totals ranged from 0.03 inch in Keosauqua (Lee County) to 2.14 inches in Maquoketa (Jackson County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.79 inch while the normal is 1.05 inches. Keokuk Lock and Dam (Lee County) reported the week’s high temperature of 88 degrees on the 24th, 12 degrees above normal. Sibley (Osceola County) reported the week’s low temperature of 45 degrees on the 18th, one degree below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of May 11 – May 17, 2020

“Late last week, a portion of Iowa was deemed ‘abnormally dry’ by the U.S. Drought Monitor. Much of the state experienced cooler temperatures and rain over the weekend, which helped mitigate dryness concerns and impacts on emerging corn and soybeans,” said Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig. “With the recent rainfall and temperatures that are expected to warm up throughout the week, crops should get a boost in the field.”

Naig made the comments as he released the weekly Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November. The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

There were 4.3 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending May 17, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Windy days made spraying weeds difficult, but planting continued prior to most of Iowa receiving rain in the latter half of the week.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 2% very short, 7% short, 78% adequate, and 13% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 1% very short, 6% short, 83% adequate, and 10% surplus.

Iowa farmers have planted 96% of the expected corn crop, nearly a month ahead of last year and almost 3 weeks ahead of the 5-year average. Only Southwest Iowa has over 10% remaining to be planted. Corn emergence improved to 62%, almost double that of the previous week. The soybean crop moved to 86% planted, also nearly a month ahead of last year and 3 weeks ahead of average. Farmers in the northern one-third of the State have less than 10% of their soybeans left to plant. One-fourth of the soybean crop has emerged. Seeding of the oat crop is virtually complete, with 91% emerged. Oat condition rated 80% good to excellent.

Hay condition rated 71% good to excellent. Pasture condition rated 62% good to excellent. Warmer temperatures would help improve growth in pastures and hayfields. Livestock conditions continue to be good with little to no stress reported.

In the preliminary weather summary

Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship,

Unseasonably cool conditions were said to persist across Iowa during the reporting period, though temperatures were not as cold as the previous week.

     .     Temperatures were generally four to eight degrees below normal with the statewide average temperature of 54.4 degrees, 6.1 degrees below normal. In a welcome change, wetter than normal conditions returned across much of Iowa with near to below normal conditions reported in pockets of western Iowa. Southeastern Iowa reported the wettest conditions with positive departures of up to three inches.

Cloud cover remained as spotty showers formed on the backside of a low-pressure system moving east through northern Illinois on Sunday (10th) afternoon. Gusty northwest winds slowed down as daytime highs remained colder than average, in the mid-40s north to mid-50s south. Cloudy conditions persisted into Monday (11th) with overnight lows remaining in the upper 30s and low 40s. Skies began to clear towards late afternoon and evening as a weak cold front dropped south across Iowa. With a light north wind, morning temperatures on Tuesday (12th) were unseasonably cold with lows across eastern Iowa in the mid to upper 20s. Cloud cover in western Iowa held temperatures in the low 40s with the statewide average at 35 degrees, 12 degrees below normal. Conditions throughout the day began to warm as partly sunny skies were observed across much of the state. Highs reached into the upper 50s and low 60s, though still six to 16 degrees below normal. A small disturbance moved through Iowa during the afternoon and evening hours on Wednesday (13th) bringing showers and thunderstorms. Rain totals from this system were highest across northern and eastern Iowa. Daytime highs remained in the mid to upper 50s.

A warm front lifted across southern Iowa overnight into Thursday (14th) in advance of a strong low-pressure center, forcing additional showers and thunderstorms in southern Iowa. Additional storms, some strong to severe, formed during the evening hours across central Iowa with multiple reports of hail and straight-line winds; a 3.00-inch-sized hailstone was reported in New Virginia (Warren County). Moderate to heavy rain fell across southeastern Iowa as thunderstorms slowly moved over the same areas. Two-day rainfall totals at 7:00 am on Friday (15th) showed nearly 40 stations reporting over two inches; half of the state’s rain gauges observed at least 0.63 inch with a statewide average rainfall of 0.84 inch. Ottumwa Industrial Airport (Wapello County) reported 4.43 inches, breaking its rainfall record for the date as well as tying its existing May daily record set in 1993. High pressure dominated during the rest of the day with overnight lows into Saturday (16th) remaining in the 50s under generally clear skies. A broad system of showers and thunderstorms entered western Iowa and propagated through the state during the early evening and overnight hours. Measurable totals were reported statewide with a concentrated rain band along the low’s attendant cold front bringing at least 0.50 inch to much of Iowa’s western two-thirds. The heaviest amounts fell across northern Iowa, where the low slowly spun before exiting the state into Sunday (17th) morning; Mason City (Cerro Gordo County) reported 2.25 inches while Ringsted (Emmet County) observed 2.43 inches. The statewide average rain total was 0.86 inch.

Weekly rain totals ranged from 0.16 inch in Sioux City (Woodbury County) to 5.14 inches at Ottumwa Industrial Airport (Wapello County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 1.71 inches while the normal is 1.05 inches. Donnellson (Lee County) and Lamoni (Decatur) reported the week’s high temperature of 81 degrees on the 14th, on average nine degrees above normal. Stanley (Buchanan County) reported the week’s low temperature of 24 degrees on the 12th, 22 degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of May 4 – May 11, 2020

On Monday, Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Planting has moved at a near-record pace this spring and with that comes the risk of a late frost. Most of the state was under frost and freeze warnings over the weekend and some stations set new record lows,” said Secretary Naig. “We expect warmer and wetter weather towards the end of the week, which is welcome news for farmers who are closely monitoring emerging corn and soybean crops.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Progress

There were 4.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending May 10, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Showers early in the week briefly slowed planting progress and below normal temperatures delayed emergence.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 4% very short, 15% short, 78% adequate and 3% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 2% very short, 8% short, 86% adequate and 4% surplus.

Iowa farmers have planted 91% of the expected corn crop, almost a month ahead of last year and 2 weeks ahead of the 5-year average. Less than 5% of the crop remains to be planted in Northwest and North Central Iowa. One-third of the expected corn crop has emerged. The soybean crop moved to 71% planted, a full month ahead of last year and over 2 weeks ahead of the average. Northwest and North Central Iowa also lead the way in soybean planting with less than 20% remaining to be planted. Only 2% of Iowa’s expected oat crop remains to be planted, with 77% of the oat crop emerged. The first oat condition rating of the season was 0% very poor, 2% poor, 19% fair, 67% good and 12% excellent.

The first hay condition rating of the season was 0% very poor, 3% poor, 26% fair, 61% good and 10% excellent. Pasture condition rated 62% good to excellent. Cooler than normal temperatures slowed growth in pastures and hayfields. Livestock conditions were good with little to no stress reported.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Iowa experienced cooler and drier conditions during the first full week of May. Measurable rain was reported statewide, though a majority of stations observed below-average totals. A notable Arctic air intrusion brought below-average coldness towards the end of the reporting period. Temperature departures were six to ten degrees below normal with eastern Iowa experiencing the coldest conditions. The statewide average temperature was 48.9 degrees, 9.0 degrees below normal.

Spotty showers moved through central Iowa during the late morning hours on Sunday (3rd) though partly to mostly sunny skies were reported for the rest of the day. Highs reached the mid to upper 70s, with locally warmer spots, under variable winds shifting out of the northeast into early Monday (4th) morning. Temperatures remained in the 40s and low 50s in southwest Iowa, slightly warmer than average. Another wave of light to moderate rain pushed into the state during the day ahead of a low-pressure system over the Dakotas, leaving measurable rain across much of Iowa. The system spun into southern Minnesota early Tuesday (5th) propagating southeast through central Iowa and clearing the state’s southeast corner close to midnight. Daytime conditions were unseasonably cold with statewide highs averaging 54 degrees, 14 degrees colder than normal. Two-day rain totals reported at 7:00 am on Wednesday (6th) were highest in eastern Iowa with multiple stations in Scott County reporting from 0.97 inch to 1.07 inches. Totals into western Iowa were generally between 0.25 inch to 0.50 inch; the statewide average was 0.42 inch. Winds shifted to the northwest through the day under cloudy conditions as highs stayed in the upper 50s and low 60s.

Starry skies greeted Iowa overnight into Thursday (7th) with morning lows in the 40s; upper 30s were reported in western Iowa. Another low-pressure center moved slowly through western Iowa into the evening hours, bringing moderate rainfall across the region. Rain totals were generally at or under 0.50 inch in Iowa’s southwest corner with lighter amounts moving into central Iowa; Clarinda (Page County) observed 0.54 inch while on the eastern periphery of the system, Indianola (Warren County) reported 0.05 inch. Skies cleared into Friday (8th) with gusty northerly winds as daytime temperatures remained unseasonably cool in the low to mid-50s. A late-season cold blast blanketed much of the upper Midwest, prompting freeze warnings overnight into Saturday (9th) with morning lows plummeting into the upper 20s and low 30s across Iowa. Several stations reported record lows for the date with Waterloo (Black Hawk County) reporting 27 degrees, breaking the station record set in 1945; the statewide average was 29 degrees, 17 degrees below normal. Temperatures quickly rebounded under southerly winds and mostly sunny skies. Daytime highs peaked in the mid-60s though a cold front swept west to east across Iowa into the nighttime hours, bringing light showers and localized gusty winds. Rain totals reported Sunday (10th) morning were under 0.20 inch with the highest totals in northern Iowa; New Hampton (Chickasaw County) reported 0.17 inch. Morning lows combined with strong northerly winds were brisk, generally in the upper 30s west to low 40s east.

Weekly rain totals ranged from 0.10 inch at Oelwein (Fayette County) to 1.07 inches at a rain gauge in Le Claire (Scott County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.56 inch while the normal is 0.99 inch. Clarion (Wright County) reported the week’s high temperature of 83 degrees on the 4th, 16 degrees above average. Elkader (Clayton County) and Stanley (Buchanan County) reported the week’s low temperature of 21 degrees on the 9th, on average 23 degrees below normal. Four-inch soil temperatures were in the low to mid-50s as of Sunday.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of April 28 – May 3, 2020

On Monday,  Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Iowa saw a second straight week of considerable planting progress across the state. The planning of input providers and farmers, combined with favorable weather conditions, has the growing season off to a strong start,” said Secretary Naig. “The great progress has been a bright spot in a time with many disruptions due to COVID-19.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Report

There were 6.1 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending May 3, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Warm, dry weather allowed Iowa farmers to advance planting well ahead of normal.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 3 percent very short, 16 percent short, 78 percent adequate, and 3 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 2 percent very short, 8 percent short, 85 percent adequate, and 5 percent surplus.

Iowa farmers planted 39 percent of the expected corn crop during the week ending May 3. Although great progress was made, in 2015 Iowa farmers were able to plant 54 percent of their corn crop during the same week. This is the first time since 2010 that at least three-quarters of the corn crop has been in the ground by May 3. Forty-six percent of the soybean crop has been planted, a full month ahead of last year, and over two weeks ahead of the five-year average. This is the highest proportion of the soybean crop planted by May 3 since records began in 1974. Farmers were able to plant over one-third of the expected soybean crop during the week ending May 3. Only 6 percent of Iowa’s expected oat crop remains to be planted, with 54 percent of the oat crop emerged.

Pasture condition rated 65 percent good to excellent. Pastures and hayfields are greening up. Cattle movement to pastures increased this week.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Warm weather returned to Iowa as temperatures averaged up to six degrees above normal across portions of the state during the reporting period. The statewide average temperature was 59.1 degrees, 5.2 degrees above normal. Spring-type showers and thunderstorms were also observed, though dry conditions persisted; all stations reported below-average rainfall with the largest departures in south-central Iowa.

Southerly winds and partly sunny skies remained through Sunday (26th) afternoon and evening with daytime highs pushing into the upper 60s and low 70s. Cloud cover increased into the early morning hours of Monday (27th) as a disturbance brought a line of showers and a few thunderstorms into western Iowa. The line remained somewhat organized, though dissipated as it moved through central Iowa into the early afternoon hours; cloud cover cleared most of Iowa’s northwestern two-thirds allowing temperatures to rise into the upper 70s. Clouds over southeastern Iowa held temperatures in the low 70s. Light showers reformed in eastern Iowa during the evening hours with rain totals for the day generally under a few tenths of an inch across southwestern Iowa; Mount Ayr (Ringgold County) reported 0.42 inch. Clouds were on the increase in advance of a low-pressure system that propagated across Iowa through the day on Tuesday (28th). Measurable totals were reported across much of Iowa with the highest amounts in the northwest as well as in east-central Iowa. De Witt (Clinton County) reported 0.67 inch while Primghar (O’Brien County) observed 0.60 inch; totals at remaining stations were generally under a few tenths of an inch. Additional light showers formed on the backside of the low as it moved out of eastern Iowa.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of April 20 – 27, 2020

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Farmers across Iowa have taken advantage of the warmer weather and widespread dry conditions over the past week,” said Secretary Naig. “The state saw a substantial increase in corn and soybean acres planted, going from 2% last week to 39% with corn progress and 0% to 9% for soybean progress.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Although most of Iowa received spotty rains, there were 5.3 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending April 26, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. In contrast, it was mid-June before Iowa farmers had a week with 5.3 days suitable for fieldwork in 2019.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 1 percent very short, 5 percent short, 85 percent adequate and 9 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 2 percent short, 87 percent adequate and 11 percent surplus.

Iowa farmers planted over one-third of the expected corn crop during the week ending April 26, for a total of 39 percent planted. Soybean planting got underway with 9 percent of the expected crop planted, 10 days ahead of last year and 1 week ahead of the average. Only 20 percent of Iowa’s expected oat crop remains to be planted, with just 22 percent of the oat crop emerged.

Pasture condition rated 1 percent very poor, 7 percent poor, 28 percent fair, 54 percent good and 10 percent excellent. Cattle have been moved onto pastures in some areas. Warmer and drier conditions improved livestock conditions.

In his preliminary weather summary, Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship, noted that Iowa continued to experience unseasonably dry conditions even though multiple disturbances brought measurable rainfall to much of the state.

Rainfall departures of up to an inch were reported across a majority of Iowa. Average temperatures rebounded from the previous reporting period with warmer conditions reported across the state’s western two-thirds; near to slightly below average conditions in eastern Iowa. The statewide average temperature was 52.6 degrees, 0.50 degrees below normal.

High pressure over the region left mostly sunny skies across Iowa through Sunday (19th) with a northerly wind holding daytime highs in the mid-50s north to low 60s south. Cloud cover increased into the early morning hours of Monday (20th) as a small disturbance brought showers across portions of western and central Iowa. A second wave of light rain moved through northern and eastern Iowa later in the day in advance of a weak cold front. Rain totals were generally under a 0.10 inch although Chariton (Lucas County) reported 0.41 inch from a heavier shower. Gusty westerly winds increased into the evening hours as highs topped out in the mid to upper 60s. Behind the front, overnight lows dipped into the 30s across northern Iowa; southern Iowa stations reported low 40s. Tuesday (21st) was a quiet and cooler than average day statewide with light, variable winds and mostly sunny conditions.

As a low pressure propagated through southern Minnesota through the night and into Wednesday (22nd) southwesterly winds built in, helping daytimes highs reach into the mid to upper 70s; scattered low 80s were also observed at some stations. The statewide average high was 77 degrees, 13 degrees above normal. Spotty showers and thunderstorms popped up during the late afternoon and persisted into early Thursday (23rd) morning. Rain totals at 7 a.m. were highest in northeastern Iowa, where stronger storms with moderate rainfall were observed. Several stations between Cedar Rapids (Linn County) and Dubuque (Dubuque County) reported totals over 0.50 inch with Postville (Allamakee County) reporting 0.78 inch.

For the rest of Thursday, mostly sunny skies allowed highs to reach the upper 70s in Western Iowa, though cloud cover held temperatures into the 60s in Eastern Iowa. Spotty showers formed in Western Iowa after sunset and continued to cross the state into Friday (24th). A secondary disturbance moving through Missouri also brought measurable rain across southern Iowa. This complex slowly pushed out of southeastern Iowa early on Saturday (25th) morning. Rain totals were highest across Iowa’s southern two-tier of counties, where slower cells produced heavier rain. Randolph (Fremont County) reported 0.70 inch while Keokuk Municipal Airport (Lee County) reported 1.12 inches; Corning (Adams County) reported 1.98 inches. Cloud cover cleared early through late morning until a line of slow-moving showers and thunderstorms pushed into western Iowa. Daytime highs were generally in the mid-60s while lows into Sunday (26th) fell into the upper 30s and lower 40s. The statewide average low was 38 degrees, three degrees below normal. Rain totals at 7 a.m. were between 0.10 – 0.20 inch in Western Iowa with a handful of stations reporting above 0.30 inch; Little Sioux (Harrison County) and Sibley (Osceola County) observed 0.37 inch. 

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from no accumulation at stations in North Central Iowa to 2.20 inches in Story City (Story County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.31 inch while the normal is 0.93 inch. The week’s high temperature of 81 degrees was reported at numerous stations on the 22nd, on average 19 degrees above normal. Estherville Municipal Airport (Emmet County) reported the week’s low temperature of 23 degrees on the 21st, 14 degrees below normal. Four-inch soil temperatures were in the low to mid-50s as of Sunday.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of April 6 – 12, 2020

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November. 

“Warmer and drier conditions were seen across the state in the earlier part of last week, allowing farmers to make progress on field work,” said Secretary Naig. “After a cool and wet weekend, the forecast points to warmer temperatures later this week. This should allow for planting progress in some parts of the state.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.
                                                                                       

                                                                                        Crop Report

Fields began to dry for most of Iowa early in the week ending April 12, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. However, northwest Iowa saw accumulating snow on Sunday, April 12 with rain falling over much of the rest of the State. Statewide there were 4.1 days suitable for fieldwork during the week. Field activities for the week included applying anhydrous and dry fertilizer, spreading manure, and tilling fields. In addition to planting oats, there were reports of corn and soybeans being planted.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 2 percent short, 79 percent adequate and 19 percent surplus.

Subsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 1 percent short, 80 percent adequate and 19 percent surplus.

Twenty-nine percent of the expected oat crop has been planted, 5 days ahead of last year and 1 day ahead of the 5-year average. There were scattered reports of oats emerged.

Pastures and hay continue to green. Calving continues with very few health problems reported.

                                                                      Preliminary Weather Summary
     Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

While measurable rain fell across a majority of Iowa, drier than normal conditions prevailed throughout the state during the reporting period. Rainfall departures were generally in the 0.40 to 0.80-inch range with the driest conditions in west-central Iowa. Slightly warmer than normal conditions were also observed across much of Iowa with sections of northern Iowa reporting near-normal temperatures. The statewide average temperature was 47.7 degrees, 2.2 degrees above normal.

Unseasonable warmth greeted Iowa on Sunday (5th) afternoon with highs topping out in the upper 50s and low 60s; overnight lows into Monday (6th) remained in the mid to upper 40s. Warm conditions continued statewide with upper 60s reported in southwestern Iowa during the afternoon. Isolated showers and a few thunderstorms popped up in central and eastern Iowa but dissipated in the evening. Rainfall amounts at 7:00 am on Tuesday (7th) were light, though Lowden (Cedar County) reported a 0.64-inch total. Morning fog was reported across much of Iowa, though it burned off as clouds cleared from west to east; skies were sunny through the rest of the day as a warm front lifted north across Iowa. Temperatures soared into the upper 80s across southern Iowa with mid to upper 70s across Iowa’s northern third.

The average daytime high was 77 degrees, 19 degrees above normal; over 20 stations reported record highs for the date. A cold front swept through Iowa on Wednesday (8th) bringing rain to northern Iowa. A few severe thunderstorms raced through southeastern Iowa during the late afternoon with up to golf ball sized hail reported in Lowell (Henry County). Rain totals of around a few tenths of an inch were reported in Iowa’s eastern quarter. Heavier amounts were observed in a handful of northeastern counties; Cresco (Howard County) reported 0.40 inch while Decorah (Winneshiek County) reported 0.42 inch. Northwest winds increased behind the front as temperatures fell into the upper 40s and low 50s.

Clear skies remained into Thursday (9th) morning as temperatures dipped into the low to mid 30s, up to 10 degrees below normal. Cloud cover increased throughout the day as winds picked up with light rain and a few snowflakes reported across northeastern Iowa. Daytime highs ranged from the upper 30s north to low 50s south. Cloud cover gradually cleared overnight with light and variable winds. Under these conditions, lows dropped into the 20s, with the average statewide temperature at 24 degrees, 11 degrees below normal. With a southerly wind, highs on Friday (10th) reached into the 50s, though still colder than average. Light showers pushed through western Iowa during Saturday (11th) morning and reformed into the afternoon. Showers and thunderstorms continued to pop up over portions of southern Iowa during the evening, persisting overnight into Sunday (12th) morning. Some early morning thunderstorms were severe with reports of one-inch hail in Murray (Clarke County). Rain totals varied from lighter amounts in western Iowa to near 0.50 inch in portions of eastern Iowa.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from no accumulation at stations in western Iowa to 1.08 inches at Cedar Rapids No. 1 (Linn County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.21 inch while the normal is 0.69 inch. Red Oak (Montgomery County) and Shenandoah (Page County) reported the week’s high temperature of 87 degrees on the 7th, on average 26 degrees above average. Little Sioux (Harrison County) reported the week’s low temperature of 16 degrees on the 10th, 17 degrees below normal. Four-inch soil temperatures were in the low 40s north to upper 40s south as of Sunday.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of March 30 – April 5, 2020

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented on this week’s Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Across Iowa, farmers and agribusiness are starting spring fieldwork and planting season will soon be underway. We encourage farmers to have a back-up plan and identify someone who can help with planting in case you get sick,” said Secretary Naig. “Farmers should also be mindful about who they allow to ride-along in the buddy seat. Social distancing guidelines apply to the tractor too.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s site at nass.usda.gov/ia.

Crop Report

Fields remained wet across most of Iowa during the week ending April 5, 2020, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Statewide there were 2.7 days suitable for fieldwork. Wet conditions slowed fieldwork activities; however, there were reports of producers applying anhydrous, spreading manure and planting oats.
Topsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 1 percent short, 77 percent adequate and 22 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 0 percent very short, 1 percent short, 77 percent adequate and 22 percent surplus.

Eight percent of the expected oat crop has been planted, 5 days ahead of last year but 2 days behind the 5-year average.

Pastures and hay have started to green. Livestock conditions were generally good with calving going well for most cattle operations.

Preliminary Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Unseasonably dry conditions dominated Iowa during the reporting period. Only sections of south-central Iowa reported above average amounts. Deficits across much of the state were between 0.20 – 0.60 inch. Temperatures were near normal statewide with an average temperature of 43.0 degrees, 0.10 degrees below normal.
A strong low pressure system moving through the upper Midwest brought windy conditions through most of Sunday (29th). Winds remained brisk out of the northwest with clouds clearing as a weak high pressure system moved into southwest Iowa. Daytime highs reached into the upper 50s in the southwest to upper 30s northwest. With high pressure dominating the region, winds calmed under clear skies into Monday (30th) morning. Temperatures during the day were well above normal with western Iowa reporting mid to upper 60s, eight to twelve degrees above average. The average statewide high was 61 degrees, seven degrees above normal. Warm and partly cloudy conditions continued into Tuesday (31st) with light and variable winds. Daytime highs were held to the mid 40s and low 50s along the Iowa-Illinois border, where cloud cover was present. Clear skies helped push highs into the mid 60s in southwestern Iowa.
The pattern began to shift during the late-night hours through Wednesday (1st) as showers and a few thundershowers formed across northwestern Iowa. The complex moved through central and eastern Iowa before dissipating in the early afternoon hours. Strong southerly winds and clearing skies allowed highs to reach into the low 70s in southwest Iowa, while temperatures remained in the 50s in eastern Iowa; in between, stations reported 60s and sunny conditions. Overnight temperatures into Thursday (2nd) remained unseasonably warm with the average low at 37 degrees, four degrees above normal. Gusty southerly winds continued through the day as a warm front lifted north across Iowa. An area of showers formed across south-central Iowa in the afternoon and moved northeast in advance of a cold front across western Iowa. Two-day rain totals were generally under 0.20 inch, although Ottumwa Industrial Airport (Wapello County) and Lamoni Municipal Airport (Decatur County) reported totals of 0.71 inch and 0.48 inch, respectively. Statewide highs remained in the upper 50s and low 60s.

Winter weather returned on Friday (3rd) as another low pushed through Iowa. Northwest Iowa reported light snow and freezing rain with a transition across central Iowa. Southeastern Iowa reported all rainfall, as it was on the warmer side of the system. Measurable precipitation fell across most of Iowa with the highest totals in south-central Iowa; generally amounts were below 0.75 inch with Columbia (Marion County) reporting 0.80 inch. Snow totals ranged from a trace amount at multiple northwestern stations to 1.0 inch in Forest City (Winnebago County). High pressure moved in behind the low allowing skies to clear through Saturday (4th) afternoon. Highs reached into the upper 40s and low 50s, leading to a pleasant day across Iowa. Morning lows on Sunday (5th) were in the upper 20s and low 30s. Cloud cover in southeast Iowa held temperatures in the low 40s.
Weekly precipitation totals ranged from trace amounts at multiple stations to 1.33 inches at Lamoni Municipal Airport (Decatur County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.25 inch while the normal is 0.65 inch. Red Oak (Montgomery County) reported the week’s high temperature of 76 degrees on the 1st; this reading was 18 degrees above average. Estherville Municipal Airport (Emmet County) reported the week’s low temperature of 13 degrees on the 4th, which is 18 degrees below normal. Four-inch soil temperatures were in the low to mid 40s as of Sunday.

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