Weekly Iowa Crops and Weather Report

Weekly Iowa Crop and Weather Report

Weekly Iowa Crop and Weather Report

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of June 7 – June 13, 2021

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Unseasonably warm temperatures and limited rainfall led to an increase in drought conditions across the state,” said Secretary Naig. “Early planted crops are starting to show moisture stress, and the short-term forecast shows only minor chances of precipitation. We’re working with other state agencies, ISU Extension and Outreach and farmers to continue monitoring the situation.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Crop Report

Continued dry conditions allowed farmers 6.6 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending June 13, 2021 according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. In addition to planting, field activities included spraying post emergence herbicides, side dressing nitrogen, and harvesting hay.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 24% very short, 46% short, 30% adequate and 0% surplus. The percentage of topsoil moisture rated short to very short increased from 39% to 70% over the week ending June 13. Subsoil moisture levels rated 21% very short, 50% short, 29% adequate and 0% surplus. Subsoil moisture conditions in northwest, north central, west central, central and south central Iowa rated close to 80% short to very short.

Across the State, farmers saw signs of crop stress in fields due to lack of precipitation and high heat. Corn emergence is nearly complete except for some re-planted fields. Iowa’s corn condition rated 63% good to excellent, 14 percentage points below the previous week. Statewide, soybeans emerged reached 93%, 9 days ahead of the 5-year average. Soybean condition rated 61% good to excellent, 12 percentage points worse than last week. There were scattered reports of soybeans blooming. Oats headed reached 56%, 3 days ahead of normal. Across Iowa, oats are starting to turn color. Iowa’s oat condition rated 57% good to excellent.

The first cutting of alfalfa hay reach 87% complete, 6 days ahead of normal. Hay condition fell to 55% good to excellent. Pasture condition dropped to 41% good to excellent. High temperatures were stressful for livestock.

Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship
Sweltering temperatures were the story across Iowa during the reporting period as long-term and very dry conditions persist over portions of the Midwest. The statewide average temperature was 77.8 degrees, 8.6 degrees above normal. Precipitation deficits continue to accumulate through the first half of June, which is climatologically the wettest month of the year for Iowa. Measurable rain only fell on a few days last week, contributing to an increase in abnormally dry and drought conditions in Iowa.

Clear skies and southerly winds boosted Sunday (6th) afternoon temperatures into the low 80s south to the low 90s northwest. Under stable atmospheric conditions, overnight lows remained unseasonably warm, only dropping into the upper 60s and low 70s across portions of Iowa. Partly cloudy skies on Monday (7th) limited warming through the day, though afternoon highs still pushed into the mid 80s south to sporadic low 90s in the north. Tuesday (8th) saw variable winds build in as afternoon highs continued the trend of above-average warmth. Very spotty thundershowers popped up in eastern and southern Iowa with limited rain amounts, though some downpours were reported; a rain gauge in Camanche (Clinton County) observed 0.91 inch. Isolated showers and thunderstorms again formed in eastern and central Iowa during late afternoon on Wednesday (9th) with three stations in Story County reporting between 0.53 inch and 0.87 inch. Overnight lows into Thursday (10th) remained in the low 70s statewide under generally clear skies. Hot temperatures returned in the afternoon as highs jumped into the low 90s south to mid 90s north with a statewide average high of 94 degrees, 14 degrees above normal.

An organized system of thunderstorms called a mesoscale convective system (MCS) propagated into western Iowa during Friday (11th) morning. Slow moving thunderstorms brought measurable rainfall to Iowa’s western half with amounts above 0.50 inch reported at several stations, though most stations observed totals under a few tenths of an inch; Greenfield (Adair County) measured 1.20 inches from slower moving thunderstorms. Scattered thunderstorms also developed in eastern Iowa ahead of a cold front with very spotty accumulations. Behind the front, relatively cooler and drier air pushed into the state. Overnight conditions were partly cloudy with northerly winds as temperatures varied from the upper 50s northwest to low 70s southeast. Saturday (12th) was warm but coupled with lower relative humidity behind the cold front. While winds shifted from a northernly to westerly direction, sunny skies warmed temperatures into the upper 80s with morning lows retreating to the upper 50s and low 60s. Overnight lows into Sunday (12th) were more seasonal at some stations but mostly warmer than normal; the statewide average low was 64 degrees, five degrees warmer than climatology.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from no accumulation at several Iowa stations to 1.97 inches at Bellevue Lock and Dam (Jackson County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.18 inch while the normal is 1.12 inches. Rock Rapids (Lyon County) observed the week’s high temperature of 99 degrees on the 10th, on average 19 degrees above normal. Chariton (Lucas County) reported the week’s low temperature of 49 degrees on the 13th, eight degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of May 31 – June 6, 2021

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“After a relatively cool end to May, above-average temperatures arrived at the end of last week, which will help push the crops along,” said Secretary Naig. “The forecast shows warm temperatures and limited chances of rain so we’re continuing to keep a close eye on the drought conditions.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Crop Report

Dry conditions and warming temperatures meant farmers had 6.2 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending June 6, 2021, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. In addition to planting, field activities included spraying post-emergence herbicides, side-dressing nitrogen, baling cover crops and harvesting hay.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 7% very short, 32% short, 59% adequate and 2% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 12% very short, 34% short, 53% adequate and 1% surplus. Subsoil moisture conditions in northwest, west-central, central and south-central Iowa were rated over 50% short to very short.

Some producers in the upper two-thirds of the state re-planted corn and soybeans due to frost damage that occurred in late May. Corn emergence reached 96%, 9 days ahead of the 5-year average. Iowa’s corn condition rated 77% good to excellent. At 98%, nearly all of Iowa’s soybean crop has been planted, almost 2 weeks ahead of normal. Statewide, soybeans emerged reached 86%, 9 days ahead of the 5-year average. Soybean emergence in southeast Iowa is slightly behind with over one-quarter of the soybean crop yet to emerge. Soybean condition rated 73% good to excellent. Oats headed reached 37%, 4 days ahead of normal. Iowa’s oat condition rated 68% good to excellent.

Iowa farmers took advantage of the week’s dry weather and completed 41% of the first cutting of alfalfa hay during the week ending June 6 to reach 58% complete, 2 days ahead of normal. Hay condition rated 62% good to excellent. Pasture condition rated 53% good to excellent. Some stress on livestock due to high temperatures was reported.

Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

The first week of meteorological summer brought warmer conditions across much of Iowa with a statewide average temperature of 69.9 degrees, 3.7 degrees above normal. Dryness also persisted with a southwest to east-central swath of the state reporting no measurable rainfall. Statewide precipitation deficits were well over an inch with smaller departures in the northwest.

Rain showers dissipated into the afternoon hours on Sunday (30th) as a weak disturbance pushed eastward through Iowa. Afternoon temperatures were in the upper 50s northwest to upper 60 southeast where sunny skies prevailed. Foggy conditions were reported in southern Iowa early on Monday (31st) as overnight lows dropped into the upper 40s and low 50s. Rainfall reports from the previous 24 hours were generally light and located across Iowa’s northwestern third; pockets approaching 0.50 inch were found along the Iowa-Nebraska border and in north-central Iowa with totals around or below 0.25 inch elsewhere. Daytimes highs on Memorial Day were near seasonal for some parts of Iowa, though southern Iowa observed low to mid-60s. Light showers formed in southeastern Iowa early on Tuesday (1st), along with a line of thundershowers later in the day in northern Iowa, which produced heavier totals in Chickasaw County. Under light southerly winds, temperatures reached into the upper 70s with partly cloudy skies. Overnight lows into Wednesday (2nd) remained in the mid-50s with light and variable winds. Conditions during much of the day were pleasant, with highs in the upper 70s and low 80s as a dry pattern set up across the state.

Dry, westerly winds and sunny skies helped push temperatures into the low 80s on Thursday (3rd) as high pressure built in over the region. Winds shifted to a southerly direction overnight into Friday (4th), with dew points rising in response to more atmospheric moisture streaming north. Under stable and warm conditions, temperatures reached into the mid-90s in northwestern Iowa while the upper 80s persisted in the east. Clear conditions continued into Saturday (5th) with morning lows in the mid to upper 60s, up to fourteen degrees above average. With a lack of overnight cooling, afternoon highs climbed into the 90s, producing the warmest day of the season thus far; the statewide average high was 91 degrees, 13 degrees warmer than normal. Starry skies and a light southerly wind continued into Sunday (6th) morning along with very warm temperatures. Decorah (Winneshiek County) observed a morning low of 70 degrees, 14 degrees above normal, while the statewide average low was eight degrees above normal at 65 degrees.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from no accumulation at many Iowa stations to 0.53 inches near New Hampton (Chickasaw County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.06 inch while the normal is 1.17 inches. Several western Iowa stations observed the week’s high temperature of 97 degrees on the 4th and 5th, on average 18 degrees above normal. Chariton (Lucas County) reported the week’s low temperature of 34 degrees on the 31st, 19 degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of May 24 – 30, 2021

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Cooler weather and overcast skies have slowed some corn and soybean growth,” said Secretary Naig. “Near-freezing temperatures over the weekend may have affected some crops across portions of northern and eastern Iowa. However, we expect warmer conditions this week, which should accelerate crop development.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Crop Report

Beneficial rains helped stimulate crop growth and cool, cloudy conditions allowed needed moisture to stay in the soil during the week ending May 30, 2021 according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Below normal overnight temperatures, primarily in low-lying areas, resulted in scattered reports of frost. Statewide there were 3.4 days suitable for fieldwork during the week. In addition to planting, field activities included spraying, side dressing and chopping cover crops.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 1% very short, 14% short, 76% adequate and 9% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 10% very short, 28% short, 58% adequate and 4% surplus.

Corn planting is virtually complete. Corn emergence reached 87%, 5 days ahead of the 5-year average. Iowa’s corn condition rated 81% good to excellent. Ninety-three percent of the soybean crop has been planted, 12 days ahead of normal. Farmers in southeast Iowa have just over one-quarter of their soybean crop remaining to be planted. Soybeans emerged reached 72%, 9 days ahead of the 5-year average. Iowa’s first soybean condition rating of the season showed 0% very poor, 1% poor, 23% fair, 60% good and 16% excellent. Oat emergence is nearly complete with 21% of oats headed, 5 days ahead of normal. Iowa’s oat condition rated 70% good to excellent.

Seventeen percent of the State’s first cutting of alfalfa hay has been completed, 2 days behind the 5-year average. Iowa’s hay condition was rated 62% good to excellent. Pasture condition improved to 54% good to excellent. There was little stress on livestock although some feedlots remain muddy.

Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

May’s final full week brought several days of cloud cover to Iowa with slightly cooler than normal temperatures blanketing the state; the statewide average temperature was 60.8 degrees, 2.9 degrees below normal. Measurable rain also fell over Iowa, though totals were still below average for this time of year with 0.50 inch to 1.00 inch deficits observed in portions of southern Iowa.

Spotty showers popped up across eastern Iowa through the afternoon and evening hours on Sunday (23rd) as daytime temperatures pushed into the low 80s south to mid-80s northwest; conditions remained in the upper 70s over the northeast where clouds were present. Rainfall was generally under a few tenths of an inch, though two stations near Coralville (Johnson County) measured 1.15 inches and 1.28 inches, respectively, from a heavier cell. Clouds cleared the state around midnight but returned as a disturbance moved into western Iowa. Spotty showers formed in eastern Iowa over the morning hours of Monday (24th) and persisted for several hours. Daytime highs remained in the upper 70s and low 80s with a southerly wind and partly sunny skies. Additional showers moved into northwestern Iowa along the border with South Dakota and Minnesota; five rain gauges in Lyon County collected from 0.61 inch to 1.15 inches from the heavier showers. With a warm air mass situated over the Midwest, overnight lows into Tuesday (25th) were very warm, remaining in the upper 60s, with a 71-degree reading at Clinton (Clinton County). Temperatures were up to 15 degrees above average with a statewide average low of 66 degrees, 13 degrees warmer than normal. In advance of a strong cold front, afternoon temperatures reached into the low to mid-80s and sunny skies, leading to atmospheric instability. As the front advanced into central Iowa, strong and some severe thunderstorms fired in the evening, quickly losing strength as the sunset; 1.25-inch hail was reported in Des Moines (Polk County).

Winds shifted to a northerly direction behind the front as clouds cleared on Wednesday (26th). Pleasant conditions persisted with 70s observed over much of Iowa. Clouds increased west to east as a low pressure system pushed into southwestern Iowa early on Thursday (27th) morning streaming additional showers across the region. The disturbance cleared Iowa’s northeastern corner later in the afternoon as cooler air rushed in behind. Under cloudy skies and northerly winds, overnight lows retreated into the low 40s. Event rainfall totals observed at 7:00 am on Friday (28th) showed nearly 50 stations picking up an inch or more with a gauge near Fort Madison (Lee County) measuring 2.40 inches; the statewide average rainfall was 0.57 inch. Daytime highs did not deviate much from morning, only breaking into the upper 40s and low 50s, well below normal for the end of May. Overnight temperatures into Saturday (29th) were at or below freezing at several northern and eastern Iowa stations with the remaining stations in the mid-30s and low 40s; the statewide average low of 37 degrees, 13 degrees below normal. Afternoon conditions were generally sunny with low to mid-60s and variable winds. Clouds again increased into Sunday (30th) as rain showers moved into northwestern Iowa with Spencer Municipal Airport (Clay County) reporting 0.49 inch at 7:00 am.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from 0.14 inch at Beaconsfield (Rinngold County) to 3.05 inches near Fort Madison. The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.89 inch while the normal is 1.08 inches. Several stations observed the week’s high temperature of 87 degrees between the 24th and 26th, on average 13 degrees above normal. Elkader (Clayton County) reported the week’s low temperature of 29 degrees on the 29th, 22 degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of May 17 – 23, 2021

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“A notable shift in the weather brought warmer and wetter conditions across much of Iowa last week as many farmers wrapped up planting,” said Secretary Naig. “Cooler temperatures have led to emergence issues in some areas, but warmer weather forecasted for this week should really push the crop along.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Crop Report

Persistent precipitation limited opportunities for farmers to plant corn or soybeans during the week ending May 23, 2021, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Statewide there were just 2.4 days suitable for fieldwork during the week. Where possible, field activities included planting and spraying.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 3% very short, 15% short, 71% adequate and 11% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 11% very short, 29% short, 54% adequate and 6% surplus.

Planting of Iowa’s expected corn crop is nearly complete at 97%, two weeks ahead of the 5-year average. Corn emergence reached 75%, 5 days ahead of normal. Iowa’s first corn condition rating of the season showed 0% very poor, 1% poor, 21% fair, 64% good and 14% excellent. Eighty-nine percent of the soybean crop has been planted, 15 days ahead of normal. Soybeans emerged jumped 29 percentage points during the week, to 53%, 9 days ahead of the 5-year average. Farmers in south-central and southeast Iowa still have at least 20% of their soybean crop to plant but some areas may need a few days to dry out enough to allow fieldwork to resume. Ninety-six percent of the oat crop has emerged and 8% of oats have headed. Iowa’s oat condition rated 62% good to excellent.

Six percent of the State’s first cutting of alfalfa hay has been completed. Iowa’s hay condition rating rose to 59% good to excellent. Pasture condition improved to 49% good to excellent. Warmer temperatures and rain have promoted good pasture and hay growth. Overall, livestock conditions are good, however, some producers reported muddy feedlots. Some cows and calves have been turned out on grass.

Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

A significant shift in the jet stream pulled moisture from the Gulf of Mexico into the Midwest bringing much-needed rainfall across the state during the reporting period. A northward bulge in the atmospheric circulation pattern also broke a streak of cooler than normal temperatures as Iowa experienced unseasonably warm conditions; the statewide average temperature was 67.6 degrees, 4.2 degrees above normal.

Dreary conditions persisted across southern Iowa through Sunday (16th) afternoon as rain showers propagated west to east. Daytime temperatures pushed into the low 70s in northwestern Iowa where the sun was shining as opposed to the upper 50s and low 60s where clouds were present. Rain totals reported at 7:00 am on Monday (17th) were highest south of Interstate 80 with widespread totals above 0.50 inch; Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow (CoCoRaHS) gauges in Creston (Union County) and College Springs (Page County) measured 1.18 inches. Showers remained across southeastern Iowa into the early afternoon as overcast skies blanketed the state with temperatures in the mid-60s to low 70s. A low-pressure center over Missouri streamed showers into eastern Iowa overnight into Tuesday (18th) with morning lows in the upper 50s and low 60s and an easterly wind. Rain continued across much of Iowa’s eastern third into the nighttime hours as winds shifted to a southerly direction. A warm front lifted north over Iowa early Wednesday (19th) ahead of another disturbance that brought a complex of showers in western Iowa. As the day progressed, more showers and a few thunderstorms moved south to north through Iowa, bringing widespread rainfall to a majority of reporting stations. Even with cloud cover, a warmer air mass pushed temperatures into the low 70s north to upper 70s south, creating muggy conditions. Rain totals were generally above a tenth of an inch with pockets of 0.50 inch to 0.75 inch in southwestern and northwestern Iowa; several rain gauges in Dickinson County reported over an inch with the statewide average rainfall at 0.28 inch.

With adequate moisture flowing into the Midwest, rain continued over Iowa through Thursday (20th) with a swath of 0.50 inch to 1.50 inches from the southwest through north-central Iowa. A discrete thunderstorm spawned a weak tornado over northwestern Dallas County during the evening with heavy downpours in certain locations; no damage was reported. Over 20 stations reported an inch or more with Boone (Boone County) picking up 2.14 inches. Overnight lows into Friday (21st) remained unseasonably warm under cloud cover and southerly winds; temperatures stuck in the mid to upper 60s with a statewide average low of 64 degrees, 13 degrees above normal. Rain lingered in eastern Iowa until the disturbance pushed out of the state. Clearing skies allowed temperatures to climb into the low 80s at some stations in northwestern Iowa. Another system propagating across western Missouri brought additional rainfall over portions of Iowa through Saturday (22nd) before dissipating as the sunset. Daytime highs ranged from low 80s northwest to mid 70s southeast where rain was present. Event totals reported on Sunday (23rd) morning were generally light though southeastern Iowa had pockets of higher amounts with Salem (Henry County) observing 0.66 inch.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from 0.14 inch at Rock Valley (Sioux County) to 3.20 inches in Clarinda (Page County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 1.24 inches while the normal is 0.99 inch. Sibley (Osceola County) and Spencer Municipal Airport (Clay County) observed the week’s high temperature of 86 degrees on the 22nd, on average 14 degrees above normal. Estherville (Clayton County) reported the week’s low temperature of 42 degrees on the 17th, five degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of May 10 – 16, 2021

On Monday, May 10, Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“Farmers are approaching the end of the planting season and the earliest planted corn and soybeans are emerging,” said Secretary Naig. “While much of the state received rainfall last week, it wasn’t enough precipitation to improve the widespread drought conditions. The second half of May is projected to be warmer and wetter, and we need to see consistent rainfalls in the months ahead.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Crop Report

Most of Iowa received some precipitation during the week ending May 16, 2021, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Statewide there were 4.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week. Much of Iowa continues to need additional precipitation. Normal temperatures would also aid crop development. Field activities included planting, spraying, and applying anhydrous and dry fertilizer. Cleaning of terraces and fence rows was also reported.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 7% very short, 27% short, 61% adequate and 5% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 12% very short, 36% short, 48% adequate and 4% surplus. Nearly one-quarter of west-central Iowa’s subsoil moisture level continues to be rated very short.

Planting of Iowa’s expected corn crop is winding down at 94% complete, almost 2 weeks ahead of the 5-year average. Only farmers in west-central Iowa have over 10% of their corn crop left to plant. During the week ending May 16 corn emergence jumped 30 percentage points to 52%, 4 days ahead of normal. Eighty-three percent of the soybean crop has been planted, 18 days ahead of the five-year average. Farmers in southeast Iowa have approximately one-third of their soybean crop left to plant. Twenty-four percent of the expected soybean crop has emerged, 1 week ahead of normal. Eighty-eight percent of the oat crop has emerged with some reports of oats headed. Iowa’s oat condition rated 61% good to excellent.

Iowa’s hay condition rating was 54% good to excellent. Some farmers have started their first cutting of alfalfa. Pasture condition rated 42% good to excellent. No problems with livestock were reported.

Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Unseasonably cool temperatures persisted across Iowa during the reporting period with negative departures of up to eight degrees observed in the state’s southeast corner; the statewide average temperature was 52.7 degrees, 7.4 degrees below normal. Late spring showers and thunderstorms also developed over much of Iowa, with the highest rain totals occurring in the southeast, though for this time of year, drier than normal conditions were reported at all Iowa observing stations.

As the potent low-pressure system pushed east of Iowa, partly cloudy skies prevailed through Sunday (9th) with afternoon highs in the upper 50s and low 60s under light, variable winds. Overnight temperatures dipped into the 40s as a weak disturbance moved through eastern Iowa, shifting winds to a northeasterly direction on that side of the state. Rain showers developed over eastern Iowa early on Monday (10th) with very light totals where rain fell. As the patten cleared and a dome of high pressure took hold over the Midwest, skies cleared with light northerly winds overnight into Tuesday (11th) morning. Lack of cloud cover and a colder air mass allowed temperatures to fall below freezing in portions of northern Iowa, while mid-40s were observed across southern Iowa; the statewide average low was 36 degrees, 11 degrees below normal. Mostly sunny skies remained across Iowa through the day with highs in the upper 50s and lower 60s, cooler than what is expected for mid-May. As the stars became visible, calm conditions allowed temperatures to drop back into the upper 30s and low 40s with light variable winds. At sunrise on Wednesday (12th), conditions remained calm and clear with a light southerly wind. Afternoon highs warmed into the mid-60s statewide, leading to a pleasant day for Iowans.

Light southerly winds built-in overnight into Thursday (13th) with temperatures staying in the upper 30s and low 40s. Sunny skies allowed temperatures to climb into the mid to upper 60s. Clouds increased through early morning Friday (14th) in advance a low-pressure center over the Dakotas, producing showers in western Iowa during the late morning. The area of rainfall pushed into central Iowa and persisted across eastern Iowa into the evening. Scattered showers reformed over Iowa’s eastern half into Saturday (15th) with totals reported at 7:00 am highest from central Iowa into the southeast corner; a rain gauge in Prole (Warren County) measured 1.16 inches. General amounts where showers persisted ranged from 0.25 inch to 0.75 inch; the statewide average was 0.21 inch. A secondary disturbance moving through northern Iowa along with warm daytime highs forced showers and thunderstorms to fire during the afternoon and evening hours. Some storms were strong with heavy downpours; a severe thunderstorm produced large hail, with a diameter of 1.75 inches, in Fayette (Fayette County). The line of thunderstorms dissipated into the evening hours with foggy conditions observed overnight, given higher dew points and low temperatures in the 50s. Rain totals reported on Sunday (16th) morning were mostly a few tenths of an inch, though several stations reported over 0.50 inch; Keokuk Lock and Dam (Lee County) measured 1.01 inches while Grundy Center (Grundy County) observed 1.40 inches.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from no rainfall at a handful of northern Iowa stations to 1.49 inches in Grundy Center. The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.37 inch while the normal is 0.79 inch. Sioux City Airport (Woodbury County) observed the week’s high temperature of 79 degrees on the 15th, seven degrees above normal. Estherville Municipal Airport (Clayton County) reported the week’s low temperature of 26 degrees on the 11th, 18 degrees below normal. Four-inch soil temperatures were in the upper 50s southeast to near 60 northwest as of Sunday.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of April 26 – May 2, 2021

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“The weather over the past several days provided a great window for farmers to plant,” said Secretary Naig. “Now we need some rain, especially in the northern parts of the state, to help push the crop along. Short-term outlooks are promising with the potential for cooler and wetter days ahead.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Crop Report

Planting of corn and soybean crops accelerated during the week ending May 2, 2021, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Statewide there were 6.3 days suitable for fieldwork for the week due to limited precipitation. Other field activities such as applying anhydrous and dry fertilizer were sporadic, due to strong winds.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 17% very short, 38% short, 45% adequate and 0% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 14% very short, 44% short, 42% adequate and 0% surplus. Dry conditions are a concern. Iowa farmers were able to plant almost half of the State’s expected corn crop during the week ending May 2 for a total of 69% planted, 9 days ahead of the 5-year average. With the week’s warmer temperatures, there were scattered reports of corn emerged.

Iowa farmers planted over one-third of the expected soybean crop during the week ending May 2 for a total of 43% planted, 12 days ahead of normal. Ninety-five percent of Iowa’s expected oat crop has been planted, 2 days ahead of last year and 10 days ahead of the 5-year average. Statewide 51% of the oat crop has emerged, 3 days ahead of average.

Pasture condition rated 41% good to excellent. Reports were received of slow growth due to lack of moisture. No livestock problems were reported.

Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Unseasonably dry conditions persisted across Iowa during the reporting period with departures nearing an inch below average at multiple stations statewide. Only portions of extreme southeast Iowa reported above-average rainfall. Warm and windy conditions were also observed on multiple days with parts of western Iowa experiencing temperatures up to 10 degrees warmer than normal; the statewide average temperature was 62.0 degrees, 8.0 degrees above normal.

A disturbance moving through the Midwest brought showers across northern Iowa in the late morning hours on Sunday (25th) with rain exiting eastern Iowa in the evening. Strong southeasterly winds built-in as a low-pressure system approached from the west. Rain totals reported at 7 a.m. on Monday (26th) were highest in the northwestern corner with Sanborn (O’Brien) and Spirit Lake (Dickinson) observing 0.35 inch; totals tailed off south and east where rain gauges collected a few tenths of an inch. With a strong southerly wind persisting under mostly sunny skies, afternoon highs pushed into the mid to upper 80s in southwestern Iowa while cloud cover held temperatures in the 60s and 70s over northern Iowa. Morning lows on Tuesday (27th) remained unseasonably warm over the state’s southern half, generally in the low to mid-60s with upper 40s under cloud cover towards the Iowa-Minnesota border. A center of low pressure pushing through Iowa shifted winds to a northerly direction from the west to east during the day leading to quite a range of temperatures; low 50s were reported behind the low in northwestern Iowa and low to mid 80s behind the warm front in southern Iowa. Showers formed across western Iowa as the disturbance propagated over the region. Showers and a few thunderstorms continue to pop up through most of Wednesday (28th), leading to higher totals in southeastern Iowa as the system moved east. Event rain totals reported at 7 a.m. Thursday (29th) was highest in the state’s southeast corner with over 20 rain gauges collecting an inch or more of new rainfall; several stations in Appanoose, Davis and Lee counties observed more than 1.50 inches.

Behind the system, skies began to clear with a light northerly breeze and near-seasonal afternoon highs in the low to mid-70s. Skies remained generally clear with a few cumulus clouds passing through northern Iowa as the moon set Friday (30th) morning.  Temperatures climbed back into the 70s with variable winds, leading to a very pleasant day statewide. Overnight lows into Saturday (1st) remained warm, ranging from the mid-50s south to low 60s north. Blustery winds out of the southwest and clear skies led to the warmest temperatures of the season with mid to upper 90s in northern Iowa and mid-80s in southern Iowa; the statewide average high was 87 degrees, 20 degrees above normal. As the sunset, winds gradually died down under starry skies into Sunday (2nd) morning with observed lows in the upper 50s and low 60s.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from no accumulation at several stations across Iowa to 1.72 inches at Rathbun Dam (Appanoose County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.18 inch while the normal is 0.89 inch. Spencer Municipal Airport (Clay County) reported the week’s high temperature of 97 degrees on the 1st, 31 degrees above average. Elkader (Clayton County) reported the week’s low temperature of 24 degrees on the 26th, 15 degrees below normal. Four-inch soil temperatures were in the low to mid-60s statewide as of Sunday.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of April 19 – 25, 2021

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Conditions report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“We’ve seen improvement in drought conditions across western Iowa,” said Secretary Naig. “Colder temperatures and some late-season snow slowed farmers down last week. However, recent weather patterns have allowed more farmers to get into the fields and a warm and windy forecast should ramp up field activities in the coming days.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Crop Report

Below normal temperatures during the week ending April 25, 2021 delayed planting for some farmers but as the weekend neared, planting accelerated according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Statewide there were 5.6 days suitable for fieldwork during the week. Field activities for the week included applying anhydrous and dry fertilizer, tilling fields and planting.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 6% very short, 28% short, 64% adequate and 2% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 10% very short, 35% short, 54% adequate and 1% surplus.

Despite hesitancy due to cold soil temps, 20% of Iowa’s corn crop has been planted, one day behind the 5- year average. Some farmers chose to plant soybeans with 6% of the crop planted, 3 days ahead of normal. Eighty-three percent of Iowa’s expected oat crop has been planted, 3 days ahead of last year and 6 days ahead of the 5-year average. Statewide 29% of the oat crop has emerged, 3 days ahead of average.

Pasture condition rated 45% good to excellent. Calving is reportedly going well. Despite pasture and hay being slow to grow, cattle are on pastures.

Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Although not unusual for this time of April, late-season measurable snow fell on multiple days during the reporting period. Even with measurable precipitation at a majority of the state’s reporting stations, unseasonable dryness was observed statewide. Colder than average conditions persisted through Iowa with temperatures up to 12 degrees below normal; the statewide average temperature was 41.7 degrees, 11.1 degrees below normal.

Partly cloudy skies remained during Sunday (18th) afternoon with a steady wind out of the west. Afternoon temperatures were generally in the low to mid 60s with a statewide average high of 62 degrees, climatologically normal for the date. A cold front swept through the state overnight into Monday (19th) bringing much cooler temperatures. Behind the front, rain switched over to snow during the morning hours with a rain and snow mix persisting over much of Iowa’s western half and along the Iowa-Missouri border. Light rain and some snow remained across southeastern Iowa on Tuesday (20th) morning with a majority of Iowa’s stations reporting a temperature below 32 degrees. Event snow totals reported at 7:00 am were generally under a half of an inch, though 10 stations reported an inch or more; Little Sioux (Harrison County) measured 2.7 inches while Sibley (Osceola County) reported 4.0 inches. Daytime temperatures rebounded into the mid to upper 40s with the statewide average high of 45 degrees, 18 degrees below normal. Iowa experienced another frosty morning on Wednesday (21st) with a vast majority of thermometers falling below 28 degrees, leading to a late-season freeze. With the sun shining and a southerly wind, warmer afternoon temperatures were observed, from the upper 50s to low 60s across the state.

High pressure built into the region Thursday (22nd) as southerly flow pushed daytime highs into the upper 50s and low 60s under sunny skies. Overcast conditions developed overnight into Friday (23rd) holding temperatures in the mind to upper 40s with some spotty light rain showers in western Iowa. Southerly winds increased over the late morning hours as a weak low pressure system sluggishly moved across northern Iowa, shifting winds to a northerly direction from west to east through the early morning hours on Saturday (24th). Starry skies were reported in the southern quarter of the state, while clouds remained over the rest of Iowa as the low’s attendant cold front propagated southeast. Lows reported at 7:00 am ranged from the upper 30s to low 40s with very light rain totals across southeastern Iowa. Clouds cleared in the west through the morning hours and sunny conditions advanced east through the evening. Daytime highs reached the low 50s north to low 60s south, still four to ten degrees below average. Clouds redeveloped in western Iowa ahead of disturbance into Sunday (25th) morning with reports of light rain and some snowflakes in the northwest corner; Orange City (Sioux County) observed 0.08 inch at 7:00 am.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from no accumulation at many stations in west-central and eastern Iowa to 0.37 inch in Sibley (Osceola County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.05 inch while the normal is 0.80 inch. Sioux City Airport (Woodbury County) and Davenport Municipal Airport (Scott County) reported the week’s high temperature of 67 degrees on the 23rd and 24th, respectively; this reading is on average one degree above normal. Sibley and Stanley (Buchanan County) reported the week’s low temperature of 16 degrees on the 21st, on average 20 degrees below normal. Four-inch soil temperatures were in the low 40s northeast to mid 50s southwest as of Sunday.

 

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of April 12 – 18, 2021

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Conditions report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“After soil temperatures warmed for several days, some farmers were able to start planting this past week,” said Sec. Naig. “With late-season snowflakes flying in parts of the state today and freezing temperatures expected early this week, farmers should continue to be cautious about planting.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Crop Report

Snow and abnormally low temperatures meant farmers were not planting row crops for most of the week ending April 18, 2021, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Statewide there were 4.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the week. Field activities for the week included applying anhydrous and dry fertilizer, spreading manure, tilling fields and planting.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 6% very short, 23% short, 67% adequate and 4% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 10% very short, 32% short, 54% adequate and 4% surplus.

Although most Iowa farmers continued to wait for warmer temperatures, 4% of Iowa’s corn crop has been planted. Nearly two-thirds of Iowa’s expected oat crop has been planted, 5 days ahead of last year and 6 days ahead of the 5-year average. Statewide 12% of the oat crop has emerged, 2 days ahead of average. There were scattered reports of soybeans planted.

Pasture condition rated 47% good to excellent. Some cattle have already been moved to pasture.

Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

After a warm first half of April, cooler conditions were observed statewide over the reporting period with temperatures up to six degrees below normal; the statewide average temperature was 44.8 degrees, 4.5 degrees below normal. A less active storm track brought drier than normal readings to rain gauges across the state with departures of up to 0.80 inch in the northeast.

Rain showers finally exited eastern Iowa early in the afternoon on Sunday (11th) as skies continued to clear west to east. Daytime highs ranged from the mid 60s in southwest Iowa to low 50s in the east. Gusty westerly winds built in across the state on Monday (12th) under mostly sunny skies with afternoon temperatures reaching into the mid to upper 50s. Cloud cover increased overnight into Tuesday (13th) with lows hovering in the mid 30s to upper 30s where clouds were present; under clear skies, thermometers in southwestern Iowa registered readings in the low 30s. Windy conditions persisted through Wednesday (14th) as afternoon temperatures remain unseasonably cool; northern Iowa reported highs in the low to mid 40s under cloud cover while sunny skies in the south pushed temperatures into the mid 50s. Morning temperatures reported at 7:00 am on Thursday (15th) were at or below freezing across much of Iowa as a cold front dropped south through the state with the coldest readings in northern Iowa; the statewide average low was 30 degrees, seven degrees colder than normal. Afternoon conditions were generally overcast with a light northwesterly wind and temperatures in the upper 40s and low 50s.

Overnight lows into Friday (16th) remained above freezing across much of northern Iowa where cloud cover was present though some stations in southern Iowa reported readings below 32 degrees. Clouds and a light northerly wind held afternoon temperatures in the mid 40s and low 50s as an upper level disturbance approached from the west. Rain showers pushed into southwestern Iowa during the afternoon hours on Saturday (17th) as chilly conditions persisted across Iowa; temperatures only reached into the mid 40s over the state’s western half. Showers lingered over southern Iowa into Sunday (18th) with 24 hour rain totals reported at 7:00 am across the southern one-third of Iowa ranging from near 0.50 inch west to a little over 0.10 inch east. Morning temperatures were also warmer where rain was falling, generally in the low 40s. Clear skies in eastern Iowa allowed temperatures to fall into the upper 30s.

Weekly rain totals ranged from no accumulation at most of northern Iowa’s stations to 0.42 inch in Randolph (Fremont County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.05 inch while the normal is 0.86 inch. Mount Ayr (Ringgold County) reported the week’s high temperature of 71 degrees on the 11th, 10 degrees above normal. Airports in Marshalltown (Marshall County) and Sioux City (Woodbury County) reported the week’s low temperature of 25 degrees on the 14th, 12 degrees below normal. Four-inch soil temperatures were in the low 50s south to upper 40s north as of Sunday.

 

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of April 5 – 11, 2021

“With spring weather now upon us, farmers across Iowa are looking to get planters into the field,” said Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig in releasing the weekly Iowa Crop Progress and Condition Report. “Rainfall over the last week has been beneficial for the drier parts of the state, though farmers should keep an eye on the forecast, as freezing temperatures are possible over the next few days.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Measurable rainfall fell across the State which allowed Iowa farmers only 3.1 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending April 11, 2021, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Fieldwork activities included applying anhydrous and fertilizer, spreading manure, spring tillage and planting oats. There were also scattered reports of corn being planted.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 4% very short, 17% short, 69% adequate and 10% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 12% very short, 28% short, 56% adequate and 4% surplus.

Thirty-seven percent of the expected oat crop has been planted, 4 days ahead of last year and 5 days ahead of the 5-year average. Statewide, 3% of the oat crop has emerged.

Pasture condition rated 3% very poor, 11% poor, 42% fair, 40% good and 4% excellent. Pastures are greening up and starting to grow. Muddy feedlots were reported in the southern part of the state.

In the weekly weather summary provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship, it was noted that a transition to an active storm track brought several waves of welcome rainfall across Iowa over the last seven days.

Slow-moving low-pressure systems with persistent, steady rain showers produced totals of up to three inches above normal in southeastern Iowa.  Cloud cover and rain could not keep temperatures down as unseasonable warmth blanketed the state during the reporting period; Iowa’s average temperature was 55.9 degrees, 10.9 degrees above normal.

Sunday (4th) afternoon was pleasant with sunny skies and southerly winds helping temperatures reach into the mid-70s east to mid-80s west. Spotty thundershowers popped up across northeastern Iowa during the late evening ahead of a low-pressure system. The disturbance brought rain showers over the northern half of the state through Monday (5th) afternoon with totals on the order of a few tenths of an inch. Afternoon highs returned to the upper 70s and low 80s as skies cleared and blustery southerly winds persisted. A line of strong thunderstorms pushed into extreme northwest Iowa during late evening and skirted the Iowa-Minnesota border into early Tuesday (6th) morning before dissipating in northeastern Iowa. Scattered showers and thunderstorms re-formed later in the day in advance of a surface boundary moving into western Iowa overnight into Wednesday (7th). As temperatures warmed into the 70s with ample low-level moisture, additional thunderstorms formed in south-central Iowa on the north side of  low-pressure center over northwestern Missouri. The storms, with locally heavy rainfall and small hail, moved north and east through late evening. Thunderstorms in eastern Iowa became stronger with a brief, weak tornado reported near Cedar Rapids (Linn County) that caused damage to several structures.

The disturbance continued to circulate additional waves of showers across the state as it propagated northeast through Thursday (8th). Two-day rain totals were highest across southern and western Iowa, with totals on the order of 0.75 inch to above an inch; multiple stations in south-central Iowa measured over two inches with Murray (Clarke County) observing 2.70 inches. All National Weather Service coop stations reported measurable rainfall with a statewide average of 0.69 inch. The low-pressure center continued to spin through the Great Lakes as rain showers gradually dissipated over Iowa on Friday (9th) morning. Overcast skies remained throughout the day with highs stuck in the mid-50s and a light northwesterly wind. Another center of low pressure propagated from Kansas into Missouri through the overnight hours into Saturday (10th). With a lack of upper-level steering flow, the sluggish low created a persistent rain shield across eastern Iowa. Western Iowa began to clear in late afternoon with temperatures reaching into the upper 50s and low 60s; under cloud cover and rain, eastern Iowa remained dreary and chilly with highs only in the mid to upper 40s. Overnight lows into Sunday (11th) dipped into the 30s in western Iowa while clouds held temperatures within the same range as late Saturday afternoon. Rainfall totals in Iowa’s eastern one-third were generally above 0.50 inch with over 20 reporting 1.00 inch or more; Keokuk Lock and Dam (Lee County) observed 2.76 inches.

Weekly rain totals ranged from 0.28 inch at Decorah Municipal Airport (Winneshiek County) to 4.42 inches Keokuk Lock and Dam. The statewide weekly average precipitation was 1.45 inches while the normal is 0.64 inch. Multiple western Iowa stations reported the week’s high temperature of 86 degrees on the 4th and 5th; on average 29 degrees above normal. Several northwestern Iowa stations reported the week’s low temperature of 28 degrees on the 11th, on average six degrees below normal. Four-inch soil temperatures were in the upper 40s east to low 50s west as of Sunday.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of March 29  – April 4, 2021

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig today commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Conditions report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly from April through November.

“With recent warm and dry conditions across the state, many farmers are eager to begin fieldwork with an eye towards planting,” said Secretary Naig. “Farmers should be cautious though as cold snaps and a late spring freeze are possible through the end of April. Chances of rain are also back in the forecast.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Crop Report

Warm and dry days allowed Iowa farmers 4.3 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending April 4, 2021, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Fieldwork activities included applying anhydrous and fertilizer, spreading manure and planting oats.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 8% very short, 25% short, 64% adequate and 3% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 12% very short, 29% short, 56% adequate and 3% surplus.

Twelve percent of the expected oat crop has been planted, 3 days ahead of last year and 4 days ahead of the 5- year average.

Pastures have started to green. Livestock conditions were generally good and producers report calving is going well.

Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Several transient weather systems propagated through the Midwest over the reporting period, leading to several days with very gusty winds across Iowa. Unseasonably dry conditions reigned statewide with no National Weather Service coop station observing measurable rainfall. Temperatures varied from above normal west to below normal east with a statewide average temperature of 43.9 degrees, 0.8 degree above normal.

Partly to mostly sunny skies greeted Iowa through Sunday (28th) afternoon. Winds gradually increased and switched from the northwest to the southeast during the late evening hours, in advance of strong low-pressure systems across the Dakotas. Daytime highs ranged from the low 40s east, where more cloud cover was present, to the mid-50s in the southwest. Overnight into Monday (29th), a warm front lifted north through Iowa with very gusty southerly winds pushing afternoon highs into the low to mid-70s. Spencer Municipal Airport (Clay County) observed 76 degrees, 26 degrees above normal; Iowa’s average high temperature was 72 degrees, 18 degrees warmer than normal. Very strong wind gusts were observed statewide with Sioux City Gateway Airport (Woodbury County) recording a 56 mph gust; sustained winds pushed into the 20 to 40 mph range. A strong cold front moved through Iowa on Tuesday (30th) dropping temperatures into a more seasonal range as blustery northwest winds and mostly clear skies persisted into the nighttime hours. Overnight lows reported at 7:00 am on Wednesday (31st) were in the low 20s northwest to low 30s southeast. Mostly cloudy skies were reported over eastern Iowa, holding afternoon highs in the low to mid-30s; Oelwein Municipal Airport (Fayette County) reported a high temperature of 32 degrees while Clarinda (Page County) observed 47 degrees, 10 degrees below normal.

Temperatures remained unseasonably cool on Thursday (1st) as a high-pressure center moved slowly through Iowa producing light and variable winds. Afternoon conditions were generally clear with temperatures in the upper 40s and low 50s. Southerly winds picked back up overnight in advance of another upper-level disturbance; with a very tight pressure gradient across Iowa, wind speeds on Friday (2nd) were in the upper 20s to mid 30 mph range. Under gusty conditions and sunny skies, temperatures rebounded into the upper 60s in western Iowa to the mid-50s east. Overnight lows into Saturday remained above average, generally in the 40s under starry skies. Clear conditions continued through Saturday (3rd) with some high-level cirrus passing through. Temperatures were very pleasant for early April with highs pushing into the low to mid-70s; the statewide average high was 72 degrees, 16 degrees above normal. Overnight lows into Sunday (4th) remained above average with temperatures in the upper 30s and 40s statewide.

While the weekly statewide precipitation normal is 0.69 inch, there was no measurable precipitation reported across Iowa. Sioux City Airport (Woodbury County) reported the week’s high temperature of 78 degrees on the 3rd; this reading was 21 degrees above average. Estherville Municipal Airport (Emmet County) reported the week’s low temperature of 11 degrees on the 1st, which is 19 degrees below normal. Four-inch soil temperatures were in the upper 40s east to mid-50s west as of Sunday.

Leave a Comment