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Weekly Iowa Crops and Weather Report

Weekly Iowa Crop and Weather Report

Weekly Iowa Crop and Weather Report

Iowa Crop Progress and Condition Report

June 27 – July 3, 2022

DES MOINES, Iowa (July 5, 2022) – Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented today on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition Report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly April through November.

“Thunderstorms added to the fireworks over the extended 4th of July weekend with heavy rain falling across portions of the state,” said Secretary Naig. “Unfortunately, drought-stricken parts of northwestern Iowa missed out on higher totals. However, forecasts are pointing to moderate to heavy rain potential as we approach a critical time for corn and soybean development.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Crop Report

There was very little rain state-wide, resulting in 6.0 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 3, 2022, according to the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. Fieldwork activities included completing the first cutting of hay, side dressing, and crop spraying.

Topsoil moisture conditions rated 7 percent very short, 27 percent short, 63 percent adequate and 3 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture conditions rated 7 percent very short, 25 percent short, 66 percent adequate and 2 percent surplus.

Corn began silking at 2 percent, 3 days behind last year and 4 days behind average. Corn condition rated 77 percent good to excellent. Thirteen percent of soybeans were blooming, 9 days behind last year and 4 days behind average. Iowa’s soybean condition rating was 77 percent good to excellent. Ninety-one percent of the oat crop was headed or beyond, 1 day behind last year. Twenty-three percent of oats were turning color, 6 days behind last year. Iowa’s oat condition was 79 percent good to excellent.

Ninety-five percent of the State’s first cutting of alfalfa hay has been completed and the second cutting was 23 percent complete. All Hay condition rated 69 percent good to excellent. Pasture condition rated 58 percent good to excellent. Livestock were showing some stress due to heat and humidity.

Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Unseasonably dry conditions exacerbated longer-term drought across northwestern Iowa as stations reported little to no rainfall over the previous week. Iowa’s southern one-third measured widespread rains but was still up to an inch below normal. Seasonal to slightly cooler temperatures were also observed with departures of up to three degrees in south-central Iowa; the statewide average temperature was 72.3 degrees, 0.70 degrees below normal.

Sunday (26th) afternoon conditions were pleasant across Iowa with gusty northwesterly winds, sunny skies and highs in the mid to upper 70s. Clear and chilly conditions persisted into Monday (27th) morning with mid-40s to mid-50s reported statewide; the state average low was 52 degrees, 10 degrees below normal. Winds were variable through the afternoon with a few passing cumulus clouds and hazy conditions in the southwest; daytime highs were near seasonal, generally in the upper 70s and low 80s. Morning lows reported near sunrise on Tuesday (28th) held in the low to mid 60s with a shifting southerly wind. Afternoon conditions were muggy with highs pushing into the mid to upper 80s ahead of a cold front dropping southeast into the Upper Midwest. A few isolated severe thunderstorms fired in advance of the boundary, producing heavy rain and a handful of half-dollar-sized hail near Kendallville (Winneshiek County). A narrow band of moderate rain also fell across Allamakee, Clayton and Dubuque counties. Skies cleared overnight with light winds, allowing pockets of fog to form in central to northeastern Iowa. High pressure took control of the region on Wednesday (29th) as sunshine and strong southerly winds drove afternoon temperatures into the upper 90s north to low 90s south.

Morning lows were unseasonably warm into Thursday (30th), ranging from the upper 60s south to mid 70s northwest. Spotty showers skirted the Iowa-Minnesota border through the late afternoon and evening hours as a weaker cold front moved through the state. Additional showers filled in over extreme southwest and south-central Iowa overnight into Friday (1st). Overall totals at 7:00 am were generally under the 0.20 inch measured at Lamoni Municipal Airport (Decatur County), though Chariton (Lucas County) picked up 0.58 inch. A few pop-up thunderstorms continued through southeastern Iowa as light rain moved over Iowa’s southern one-third into the afternoon, leaving behind minor totals; Columbus Junction recorded 0.60 inch from a heavier thundershower. Afternoon temperatures reached into the upper 70s and low 80s north, where the sun was shining, while cloud cover held temperatures to the low 70s south. Foggy conditions and poor air quality were reported over southern Iowa into Saturday (2nd), partially due to calm winds, high dewpoints and particulate from exploding fireworks. Daytime conditions were mostly sunny with light southerly winds and highs in the mid to upper 80s. Outflow from Minnesota thunderstorms fired an isolated cell in extreme northeast Iowa later in the afternoon, where a few stations observed rainfall. Mostly clear conditions continued into Sunday (3rd) morning with lows in the upper 50s and low 60s.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from no accumulation at a majority of northwestern and east-central Iowa stations to 1.20 inches at a gauge near Cresco (Howard County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.10 inch while the normal is 0.93 inch. Sioux City Airport (Woodbury County) reported the week’s high temperature of 100 degrees on the 29th, 16 degrees above normal. Battle Creek (Ida County) reported the week’s low temperature of 44 degrees on the 27th, 17 degrees below normal.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week of June 20 – 26, 2022

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented Monday on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition Report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly April through November.

“The long stretch of hot days finally ended late last week as a shift in the weather pattern moderated temperatures over the weekend,” said Secretary Naig. “In the presence of below-normal rainfall and warmer-than-average conditions, drought expanded in northwest Iowa, where precipitation deficits have persisted for almost two years. Short-term outlooks into July show better chances of wetter conditions, which would be beneficial as we reach a critical stage in crop development.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

 

Crop Report

Mostly warm and dry conditions resulted in 5.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending June 26, 2022, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Fieldwork activities included cutting hay and spraying crops.

Topsoil moisture condition rated 6 percent very short, 22 percent short, 67 percent adequate and 5 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture condition rated 5 percent very short, 22 percent short, 68 percent adequate and 5 percent surplus.

Corn condition rating was 80 percent good to excellent. Ninety-seven percent of soybeans have emerged, 4 days behind last year but 3 days ahead of the 5-year average. Two percent of soybeans were blooming, 12 days behind last year and 1 week behind the average. Iowa’s soybean condition rating remained 80 percent good to excellent. Eighty percent of the oat crop has headed, 2 days behind last year. Twelve percent of oats were turning color, 6 days behind last year. Iowa’s oat condition was 81 percent good to excellent.

Ninety-one percent of the State’s first cutting of alfalfa hay has been completed and the second cutting has started with 6 percent complete. All hay condition rated 72 percent good to excellent. Pasture condition rated 62 percent good to excellent.

 

Weather Summary

Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Temperatures across Iowa were cooler than the previous reporting period, though still several degrees above normal. Portions of northern Iowa reported positive departures of up to six degrees; the statewide average temperature was 75.4 degrees, 3.1 degrees above normal. Moderate to heavy rain fell across eastern Iowa where several stations measured at least two inches of above average totals. Western Iowa remained unseasonably dry with departures approaching two inches below normal.

Southerly winds and cloudless skies boosted Sunday (19th) afternoon temperatures into the mid 90s in western Iowa while eastern Iowa experienced mid to upper 80s. Stars were shining overnight into Monday (20th) with morning temperatures well above average, ranging from the upper 70s northwest to low 60s southwest. Sweltering conditions developed into the afternoon hours as dewpoint temperatures pushed into the low to mid 70s, creating triple-digit heat index values in the presence of mid 90-degree air temperatures and clear skies; the statewide average high was 93 degrees, 11 degrees above normal. Anomalously warm morning temperatures remained into Tuesday (21st) with lows in the mid to upper 70s over most of Iowa under starry skies. A dry cold front pushed through Iowa during the daytime hours, shifting winds to a northwesterly direction and lowering the humidity. Temperatures remained in the upper 80s north to mid 90s south, though conditions were appreciably less muggy behind the front. Ample instability was present in southeastern Iowa to fire strong to severe thunderstorms along the surface boundary later in the evening. Several stations in south-central Iowa measured at least 0.50 inch of rainfall with Rathbun Dam (Appanoose County) reporting 1.36 inches. Skies cleared overnight into Wednesday (22nd) with winds becoming light and northwesterly. The incoming airmass was dry and pleasant, allowing afternoon highs to peak in the mid to upper 80s. Partly cloudy conditions developed in southwestern Iowa into Thursday (23rd) with overnight lows dropping into the low to mid 60s statewide. Showers skirted to the Iowa-Missouri border just after noon before dissipating in the late evening. Daytime highs varied from the upper 70s southwest to the low 90s north and west.

Thunderstorms formed in western Iowa later in the night and persisted across central Iowa into Friday (24th) morning. The complex lost some energy as showers moved into eastern Iowa into the afternoon hours. Several stations in Polk and Story counties measured from 1.07 inches to 1.50 inches. A secondary, narrow line popped up in southern Iowa during the evening hours. The main disturbance fired thunderstorms in the northwest and stretched over northern Iowa overnight into Saturday (25th) leading to flooding in Sioux and O’Brien counties. Heavy rainfall associated with stronger thunderstorms was also reported in eastern Iowa with 44 stations across the state observing at least an inch of rainfall; Iowa City (Johnson County) measured 3.75 inches while the statewide average total was 0.81 inch. An additional line of thunderstorms formed along and ahead of a cold front during the late afternoon hours dropping heavier rainfall in eastern Iowa with Muscatine (Muscatine County) picking up 1.36 inches. Overnight lows into Sunday (26th) cooled into the upper 50s in western Iowa while low to mid 60s were observed in eastern Iowa.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from no accumulation at several western Iowa stations to 4.25 inches at Iowa City (Johnson County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.91 inch while the normal is 1.05 inches. Multiple stations reported the week’s high temperature of 99 degrees on the 20th, 21st and 22nd, on average 16 degrees above normal. Audubon (Audubon County) reported the week’s low temperature of 50 degrees on the 26th, six degrees below normal.

Week May 9 – May 15, 2022

 Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented today on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition Report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly April through November.

“Very hot temperatures and drier than normal conditions last week allowed farmers to make significant planting progress across much of Iowa,” said Secretary Naig. “As we look ahead, weather outlooks show promise in keeping planters rolling and farmers busy in the fields.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Crop Report

Significantly drier and warmer weather allowed Iowa’s farmers 5.2 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending May 15, 2022, according to the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. Fieldwork activities included spraying and planting.

Topsoil moisture condition rated 1 percent very short, 11 percent short, 81 percent adequate and 7 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture condition rated 4 percent very short, 20 percent short, 70 percent adequate and 6 percent surplus.

Farmers planted 43 percent of Iowa’s expected corn crop during the week ending May 15, 2022, to reach 57 percent planted, 2 weeks behind last year and 9 days behind the 5-year average. Eight percent of the corn crop has emerged, 11 days behind last year and 9 days behind average. Thirty-four percent of soybeans have been planted, just over 2 weeks behind last year and 1 week behind the 5-year average. Just 3 percent of soybeans have emerged, 10 days behind the previous year and 6 days behind average. Eighty-nine percent of the expected oat crop has been planted, 16 days behind last year and 10 days behind the 5-year average. Fifty-eight percent of the oat crop has emerged, 11 days behind last year and 1 week behind average.

Hay and pasture growth improved greatly with above normal temperatures. Iowa’s hay condition rating improved to 68 percent good to excellent. Some farmers have begun their first cutting of alfalfa. Pasture condition improved to 53 percent good to excellent. Livestock conditions were good as they were turned out from muddy feedlots to pasture, although feed stocks were low.

Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Anomalously hot conditions blanketed much of the central United States as a strong blocking ridge within the atmospheric flow pushed Iowa temperatures up to 16 degrees above normal; the statewide average temperature was 72.5 degrees, 13.0 degrees above normal. Strong weather disturbances riding along the ridge produced multiple rounds of strong thunderstorms with a rare large-scale dust storm ahead of a derecho impacting northwest Iowa, eastern South Dakota and southern Minnesota. Below-average rainfall was measured statewide with departures of almost an inch below normal over southeastern Iowa.

Showers and a few thunderstorms continued to move across central and eastern Iowa through Sunday (8th) afternoon with temperatures ranging from the mid-50s north to upper 60s south. A pocket of heavy rain from sluggish storms was reported across Story, Hardin and Grundy counties with over 20 stations in the vicinity observing at least an inch. Southeasterly winds increased overnight into Monday (9th) as partly to mostly sunny skies reigned with a strong thermal ridge setting up across the Midwest; combined with southerly winds, temperatures over the next several days would be well above average with many stations breaking daily record highs. Afternoon highs hit the low to mid-90s in southwestern Iowa with low to mid-80s northeast. A cold front moving through the Upper Midwest forced strong to severe thunderstorms in northeast Iowa as cold air clashed with warm and humid conditions close to midnight. Thunderstorms dissipated a few hours later with winds shifting to the north and temperatures dropping into the 50s behind the front. Rain totals reported at 7:00 am on Tuesday (10th) were isolated to the northeast corner with a narrow band stretching southwest. About half of the stations reporting rainfall had amounts above 0.40 inch with Greenfield (Adair County) measuring 1.20 inches. A warm front draped west to east across Iowa split afternoon temperatures by nearly 20 degrees statewide with upper 70s north to low 90s over the south. Overnight lows remained in the mid-60s to mid-70s as patchy fog and haze were visible at sunrise on Wednesday (11th). Skies remained mostly clear through the day as temperatures reached into the 90s. A strong low pressure fired several severe thunderstorms in northwestern Iowa during the late evening with rain above 0.20 inch reported at a handful of stations; Sibley (Osceola County) observed 1.48 inches.

Thursday (12th) was a remarkable weather day in the Midwest with a late afternoon severe-warned squall line racing northeast through Nebraska and South Dakota, clipping Iowa’s northwest corner. The thunderstorm line was classified as a derecho, the third to impact Iowa since 2020. Rain-evaporated cold air outflow in front of the derecho lofted dry topsoil, producing a rare dust storm known as a “haboob.” Hot temperatures fed the instability with a statewide average high hitting 93 degrees, 23 degrees above normal. A secondary thunderstorm line formed along a cold front and left measurable rain across much of western Iowa. Most stations reporting rainfall had totals under 0.25 inch; a few measured over 0.50 inch with 0.62 inch reported at Little Sioux (Harrison County). Friday (13th) was pleasant with near-seasonal temperatures in the 70s and sunshine. Winds remained variable overnight into Saturday (14th) with morning lows dropping into the mid to upper 50s as a cold front moved into western Iowa. Afternoon highs in front of the boundary pushed into the upper 80s while behind the front, 70s were observed. With the clash of airmasses, a few isolated severe-warned thunderstorms fired in the afternoon in central Iowa and then later in the night. Moderate rainfall occurred in west-central and southern Iowa with totals reported on Sunday (15th) morning in the 0.25 to 0.50 inch range.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from no accumulation at several southeastern stations to 2.55 inches at Zearing (Story County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.42 inch while the normal is 0.95 inch. Little Sioux reported the week’s high temperature of 100 degrees on the 12th, 29 degrees above normal. New Hampton (Chickasaw County) and Oskaloosa (Mahaska County) reported the week’s low temperature of 41 degrees on the 9th, on average five degrees below normal. Four-inch soil temperatures were in the mid to upper 60s statewide as of Sunday.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week May 2 – May 8, 2022

 Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented today on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition Report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly April through November.

“A noticeable shift in the cool and wet weather pattern appears to have given farmers a much-needed window for planting this week,” said Secretary Naig. “In the days ahead, unseasonably hot temperatures and isolated chances of thunderstorms should allow farmers to make good progress.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Crop Report

The week began with rain and colder than normal temperatures, but Iowa farmers found the end of the week fair enough to resume planting row crops with 1.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending May 8, 2022, according to the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. Fieldwork activities also included spraying, when windy conditions allowed and spreading manure.

Topsoil moisture condition rated 1 percent very short, 9 percent short, 73 percent adequate and 17 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture condition rated 4 percent very short, 19 percent short, 67 percent adequate and 10 percent surplus.

Farmers made little progress last week, with just 14 percent of Iowa’s expected corn crop planted, at least two weeks behind both last year and the 5-year average. Seven percent of soybeans have been planted, 12 days behind last year and 11 days behind average. Seventy-two percent of the expected oat crop has been planted, 17 days behind last year and 11 days behind the 5-year average. Thirty-two percent of the oat crop has emerged, 12 days behind last year and 8 days behind normal.

The first hay condition rating of the season was 1 percent very poor, 5 percent poor, 36 percent fair, 51 percent good and 7 percent excellent. Pasture condition rated 43 percent good to excellent. Pasture and hay growth improved with slightly warmer temperatures. Livestock conditions were good, with calves growing well despite muddy feedlots and pastures.

Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

The stretch of unseasonably cold reporting periods continued through the first week of May with temperature departures ranging from four to eight degrees below normal across Iowa; the statewide average temperature was 51.3 degrees, 5.2 degrees below normal. Rain fell at all reporting stations with pockets of slightly above average totals in west-central and eastern Iowa, though the remainder of the state experienced below-average totals of near an inch along the Iowa-Minnesota border.

Overcast skies continued through Sunday (1st) afternoon with a northwesterly wind shift into the evening hours. Daytime temperatures held in the upper 40s north to low 50s south with slightly warmer conditions in the southwest corner where skies were clearing. Light rain began pushing into southwestern Iowa just after 7:00 am on Monday (2nd) in advance of a large area of low pressure. Sunny skies were observed in eastern Iowa allowing afternoon highs to push into the upper 50s as thick clouds and rainfall held temperatures in the 40s over the rest of the state. The disturbance, along with pockets of moderate rainfall, continued to propagate through Iowa overnight into Tuesday (3rd) as the backside of the low held light showers in eastern Iowa. Overcast conditions persisted even as the low moved out of the region, accompanied by light northeasterly winds and highs in the 50s. Event rain totals varied from 0.50 to 0.75 inch across a broad swath of the state with only the northwest corner missing out; the statewide average rainfall was 0.65 inch with 25 stations measuring at least an inch. Breaks in the clouds began to form over northern Iowa during the late-night hours with patchy fog reported just before sunrise of Wednesday (4th). Clear skies did not last long in western Iowa but held on in the east where upper 50s and low 60s were reported. An upper-level disturbance brought light showers into western Iowa overnight into Thursday (5th) morning with totals generally between 0.10 and 0.25 inch, though heavier pockets were observed in the northwest; Remsen (Plymouth County) measured 0.40 inch.

Spotty showers remained across parts of southern and eastern Iowa with easterly winds and temperatures in the mid to upper 50s. Rain showers finally dissipated along the Iowa-Missouri border very early on Friday (6th) as skies cleared through the afternoon. Warmer conditions were present over the state’s western half with mid to upper 60s observed while eastern Iowa held in the low 60s. Saturday (7th) was the most pleasant day of the week with southerly winds, brilliant sunny skies and near-seasonal temperatures in the 70s; the statewide average high was 71 degrees, three degrees above normal. Clouds increased into the nighttime hours as another disturbance brought showers and thunderstorms into Iowa’s western half early Sunday (8th) morning. Totals reported at 7:00 am showed moderate rainfall in west-central to northwest Iowa and lesser amounts farther east; Sac City (Sac County) measured 0.63 inch while general totals were a few tenths of an inch at a majority of stations receiving rain.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from 0.05 inch at Knoxville (Marion County) to 1.75 inches at Sac City. The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.91 inch while the normal is 0.96 inch. Spencer Municipal Airport (Clay County) reported the week’s high temperature of 77 degrees on the 7th, 10 degrees above normal. Several northern stations reported the week’s low temperature of 29 degrees on the 4th, on average 13 degrees below normal. Four-inch soil temperatures were in the low 50s east to upper 50s west as of Sunday.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week April 25 – May 1, 2022

 Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented today on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition Report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly April through November.

“Despite another cold, wet week that slowed fieldwork, planting has begun in some areas of the state,” said Secretary Naig. “Looking ahead, short-term temperature outlooks suggest a shift toward much needed warmer weather but, unfortunately, with a wetter storm track.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Crop Report

Despite rain and cold conditions, Iowa farmers made progress planting corn and soybeans with 2.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending May 1, 2022, according to the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. Fieldwork activities also included tillage, applying anhydrous and nitrogen, planting oats, and limited spraying.

Topsoil moisture condition rated 3 percent very short, 13 percent short, 68 percent adequate and 16 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture condition rated 8 percent very short, 22 percent short, 63 percent adequate and 7 percent surplus.

Despite continued cool soil temperatures, 9 percent of Iowa’s expected corn crop has been planted, 11 days behind last year and 9 days behind the 5-year average. Farmers in the western one-third of the Iowa had at least 3.7 days suitable for fieldwork and made more planting progress than those in the rest of the State. Four percent of the expected soybean crop has been planted, 9 days behind the previous year and 5 days behind the average. Sixty-three percent of the expected oat crop has been planted, almost 2 weeks behind last year and 1 week behind the 5-year average. Eighteen percent of the oat crop has emerged, 10 days behind last year and 6 days behind the average.

Pasture and hay growth were still slow. Livestock conditions were challenging, with muddy feedlots and pastures.

Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

April ended unseasonably cold and windy with near-normal to above-average rainfall statewide. Portions of southwestern and north-central Iowa reported up to two inches of above-average rainfall as an active weather pattern persisted over the Upper Midwest. With more clouds and precipitation present, colder than expected conditions continued with departures of up to nine degrees in northern Iowa as the statewide average temperature came in at 48.5 degrees, 5.6 degrees below normal.

Strong westerly winds and cloudy skies blanketed much of Iowa’s western half into Sunday (24th) afternoon with a mix of upper 40s and low 50s north to low 60s in the south. Overcast skies continued into Monday (25th) morning with temperatures near freezing in northern Iowa and in the low 40s farther south. A northwesterly wind held daytime highs in the 30s and 40s, well below normal for late April, with a statewide average high of 45 degrees, 18 degrees below normal; Forest City (Winnebago County) observed 35 degrees, 26 degrees below the 30-year climatology. Skies gradually cleared west to east as winds died down and became directionally variable. Tuesday (26th) morning temperatures dipped into the low 20s northwest to low 30s southeast. A surface boundary across central Iowa created a spectrum of afternoon temperatures, ranging from the mid-40s northeast to low 70s southwest. Winds shifted to the east through the overnight hours as skies remained cloudless. Morning lows at 7:00 am on Wednesday (27th) stayed in the low 50s in southwest Iowa as a weak warm front lifted over the region and shifted winds to a southerly direction; conditions in northern Iowa were colder with temperatures hovering in the mid-30s. Very warm temperatures were observed south of the boundary with afternoon conditions reaching into the upper 70s and low 80s. An area of light to moderate showers formed in northeastern Iowa around midnight and shifted into eastern Iowa through early Thursday (28th) afternoon. Southerly winds helped temperatures rise into the mid to upper 70s in southern Iowa with clouds increasing later in the evening. Rain totals from northern to eastern Iowa were generally around a few tenths of an inch though 10 stations measured an inch or more; Estherville (Emmett County) reported 1.72 inches while Mason City (Cerro Gordo County) observed 1.30 inches.

A secondary cluster of showers and thunderstorms pushed into southwestern Iowa ahead of a low-pressure system early on Friday (29th). Rain showers moved east through the state as temperatures only reached into the low to mid-50s. As the low’s attendant cold front propagated into western Iowa during the early nighttime hours, strong to severe thunderstorms fired along the cold front and produced a handful of severe straight-line wind reports in the southwest corner. The line of storms stretched into northwestern Iowa and swept across Iowa leaving behind measurable rainfall statewide. The line dissipated across eastern Iowa after daybreak on Saturday (30th). Event totals were above 0.25 inch at most reporting stations with several stations observing at least an inch; Lamoni (Decatur County) measured 1.92 inches while the statewide average rainfall was 0.38 inch. The low center continued to spin along the Iowa-Minnesota border through the day with temperatures hovering in the upper 40s and low 50s. Overcast conditions persisted overnight as the system moved into the Great Lakes region. Thick stratus clouds held morning temperatures in the low to mid-40s with some lingering light showers reported early Sunday (1st) morning.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from 0.29 inch at Jefferson (Greene County) to 2.57 inches at Lamoni Municipal Airport (Decatur County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.95 inch while the normal is 0.86 inch. Little Sioux (Harrison County) and Oakland (Pottawattamie County) reported the week’s high temperature of 82 degrees on the 27th, on average 16 degrees above normal. Cherokee (Cherokee County) and Sioux City Airport (Woodbury County) reported the week’s low temperature of 19 degrees on the 26th, on average 20 degrees below normal. Four-inch soil temperatures were in the upper 40s to low 50s across a majority of Iowa as of Sunday.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week April 8 – April 24, 2022

 Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented today on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition Report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly April through November.

“It was another active weather week with additional periods of severe thunderstorms and locally heavy rainfall,” said Secretary Naig. “Cooler temperatures and windy conditions also persisted, though soil temperatures are slowly rising. Soil temperatures are at or above 50 degrees for much of the southern two-thirds of Iowa.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Crop Report

Rain, high winds, and cold conditions continued to stall spring planting, limiting Iowa farmers to 2.3 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending April 24, 2022, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Fieldwork activities were primarily applying anhydrous and fertilizer. Reports were received of limited corn and soybean planting as well as planting oats. In addition to periodic precipitation, cool soil temperatures have some farmers waiting to plant row crops.

Topsoil moisture condition rated 4 percent very short, 18 percent short, 67 percent adequate and 11 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture condition rated 9 percent very short, 29 percent short, 58 percent adequate and 4 percent surplus.

Forty-seven percent of the expected oat crop has been planted, 10 days behind last year and 5 days behind the 5-year average.

Pastures were slowly turning green. Hay supplies were dwindling in some areas. Livestock conditions were generally good, with calving in full swing.

Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Several rounds of showers and thunderstorms brought moderate to heavy rain across central and eastern Iowa through the reporting period; some stations measured over two inches of above-average rainfall. The active storm track produced multiple occurrences of severe straight-line winds, large hail and an isolated tornado. Unseasonably cool temperatures also persisted with departures of up to nine degrees below normal; the statewide average temperature was 48.4 degrees, 4.3 degrees below normal.

Light rain and snow showers continued Easter Sunday (17th) afternoon with a band of 1.5 – 3.0 inch snow totals measured from south-central into northwestern Iowa; a station near Indianola (Warren County) reported 4.0 inches. Afternoon highs ranged from the low 30s northwest to low 40s southeast. Most of Iowa’s stations observed measurable precipitation totals at 7:00 am on Monday (18th) in the range of 0.20 to 0.40 inch. A dome of high pressure took control of the weather pattern as winds shifted to the northwest with clearing skies in western Iowa. Under sunny skies, daytime temperatures pushed into the upper 40s and low 50s, while upper 30s and low 40s blanketed eastern Iowa where clouds persisted. Starry skies and variable winds were reported into Tuesday (19th) morning with lows in the 20s. Cloud cover gradually increased from west to east through the afternoon and evening hours as southwesterly winds became gusty. A warm front and return flow continued to warm temperatures across southern Iowa overnight and hold them in the upper 40s and low 50s by sunrise on Wednesday (20th). A fast-moving disturbance produced scattered showers throughout the day with most of Iowa reporting measurable totals. Much of Iowa’s eastern two-thirds measured at least 0.25 inch with totals over 0.75 inch in the southeast corner; Donnellson (Lee County) observed 1.25 inches. Under clear skies, windless conditions and ample low-level moisture, very dense fog formed overnight and persisted through the late morning on Thursday (21st) until increasing winds and solar heating mixed out the lower atmosphere. Afternoon highs, in the upper 50s to mid-60s, were pleasant under mostly sunny skies.

A line of showers formed in the late evening over southern Iowa and pushed north along an atmospheric boundary. The area of rain expanded across central and northern Iowa as severe storms pushed into western Iowa prior to sunrise on Friday (22nd). Pockets of heavier rainfall associated with slow-moving thunderstorms produced flash flooding across several central Iowa counties with rain rates approaching three inches per hour. The disturbance exited eastern Iowa in the early afternoon as gusty southerly winds built-in. A strong warm front lifted north over Iowa, pushing daytime temperatures into the upper 70s and low 80s in southern and western Iowa; temperatures remained in the low 60s northeast; the statewide average high was 73 degrees, 10 degrees above normal. Overnight temperatures remained unseasonably warm, holding in the upper 60s and low 70s in southwestern Iowa. A line of strong thunderstorms rapidly formed ahead of a strong low-pressure disturbance and moved across western Iowa after sunrise on Saturday (23rd). Some storms turned severe as the line raced into central Iowa before dissipating northeast. A second, stronger squall line formed along the low’s attendant cold front during the late afternoon hours as temperatures hovered in the mid to upper 70s with ample instability. Several storms turned severe through the evening hours with multiple reports of 60 – 70 mph winds and quarter-sized hail; a weak tornado was also spotted near Sheldahl (Boone County). Pockets of heavier rain totals were found in south-central Iowa with general storm amount between a tenth and half of an inch. A gauge in Des Moines (Polk County) measured 1.06 inches with a statewide average at 0.20 inch reported at 7:00 am Sunday (24th).

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from 0.08 inch at Randolph (Fremont County) to 4.80 inches in Maxwell (Story County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 1.35 inches while the normal is 0.90 inch. Sioux City Airport (Woodbury County) reported the week’s high temperature of 86 degrees on the 22nd, 23 degrees above average. Atlantic (Cass County) and Audubon (Audubon County) reported the week’s low temperature of 16 degrees on the 19th, on average 21 degrees below normal. Four-inch soil temperatures were in the upper 40s northwest to upper 50s southeast as of Sunday.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week April 11 – April 17, 2022

 Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented today on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition Report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly April through November.

“Iowa saw a mix of winter and spring weather last week. While severe storms swept through parts of the state leaving behind isolated damage, rain and Easter snowfall provided additional subsoil moisture,” said Secretary Naig. “Soil temperatures are still hovering in the upper 30s and low 40s, but outlooks point to warmer temperatures for the week ahead.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Crop Report

Snow, high winds, and continued cold conditions limited Iowa farmers to 2.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending April 17, 2022, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Farmers have been applying anhydrous and fertilizer, spreading manure, tilling fields, and planting oats where possible while preparing to plant row crops.

Topsoil moisture condition rated 7 percent very short, 22 percent short, 66 percent adequate and 5 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture condition rated 11 percent very short, 33 percent short, 54 percent adequate and 2 percent surplus.

Twenty-nine percent of the expected oat crop has been planted, 8 days behind last year and 3 days behind the 5-year average. Oats are beginning to emerge across the State.

Pastures were still mostly dormant although there were reports of some starting to turn green. Livestock conditions were generally good, with many new calves arriving.

Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Severe weather returned early last week with eight tornadoes reported across northern Iowa, the strongest having winds of up to 135 mph. While rainfall accompanied the disturbance that produced these strong thunderstorms, much of eastern and northwestern Iowa observed drier than normal conditions. Overall temperatures were also warmer than the previous reporting period, though up to eight degrees below normal in the northwest; the statewide average temperature was 42.1 degrees, 6.2 degrees below normal.

Very windy conditions continued through Sunday (10th) afternoon as a low-pressure center pushed across northern Iowa. Winds shifted from the southeast to a westerly direction as daytime temperatures rose into the upper 60s and low 70s at many stations; upper 70s were observed in south-central Iowa. Overnight temperatures into Monday (11th) ranged from the upper 20s northwest to low 40s southeast under cloudless skies. Pleasant conditions persisted through the afternoon hours with above-average daytime highs in the low to mid-60s. Skies remained clear early into Tuesday (12th) morning, though cloudy conditions began to develop in western Iowa by sunrise as a potent weather system approached Iowa. Southeasterly winds in the 20 to 30 mph range pumped in warm, moist air ahead of a strong cold front; a warm front moving north across southeastern Iowa pushed temperatures into the 80s within the warm sector of the strong low-pressure system. The mix of unseasonably warm air, atmospheric instability and wind shear over northern Iowa fired supercell thunderstorms late in the afternoon. Several of these storms produced tornadoes with a stronger EF-2 that moved through Gilmore City (Humboldt County), producing damage to multiple farms. As the cold front swept across Iowa during the late afternoon and evening hours, a second round of severe weather impacted western Iowa with many reports of large hail and strong straight-line winds. The line lost energy overnight as it pushed east, though moderate rain was observed. Rain totals reported at 7:00 am on Wednesday (13th) were highest in north-central Iowa with nine stations measuring over an inch; much of the western half of Iowa reported totals between 0.25 to 0.75 inch. Light showers lingered through the day as temperatures lingered in the mid-30s to mid-40s.

Gusty westerly winds built-in overnight into Thursday (14th) with wind speeds increasing into the 30-40 mph range through the day; Estherville Municipal Airport (Emmet County) observed a wind gust of 61 mph. Afternoon highs were in the upper 30s north to low 50s south, where skies were clear. Partly cloudy skies developed into early Friday (15th) morning as winds eased and shifted to the northwest with mid to upper 40s were observed in the afternoon. Clouds moved out lending to mostly sunny conditions over Iowa on Saturday (16th) with chilly morning temperatures; the statewide average low was 25 degrees, 12 degrees below normal. Temperatures rose into the upper 40s and low 50s in southern Iowa while readings were up to 10 degrees cooler in the north. An approaching disturbance brought thick stratus clouds into western Iowa into Sunday (17th) morning with winds turning to an easterly direction. Low temperatures varied from the low 20s in eastern Iowa to mid-30s in the west under clouds.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from no accumulation at several northwest Iowa stations to 4.50 inches at St. Ansgar (Mitchell County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.41 inch while the normal is 0.79 inch. Little Sioux (Harrison County) reported the week’s high temperature of 90 degrees on the 12th, on average 29 degrees above average. Primghar (O’Brien County) and Sioux City (Woodbury County) reported the week’s low temperature of 16 degrees on the 16th, on average 20 degrees below normal. Four-inch soil temperatures were in the upper 30s northeast to mid 40s southwest as of Sunday.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week April 4 – April 10, 2022

 Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented today on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition Report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly April through November.

“A stagnant weather pattern across the upper Midwest has brought persistent light rain and snow to portions of Iowa over the past week,” said Secretary Naig. “As farmers are eager to begin fieldwork, colder conditions have hindered their efforts. The additional moisture, however, will be beneficial for the upcoming growing season.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Crop Report

Snow, rain, and cold conditions limited Iowa farmers to 2.0 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending April 10, 2022, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Those who have been able to do any fieldwork have been applying anhydrous and fertilizer, spreading manure and planting oats.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 7 percent very short, 21 percent short, 65 percent adequate and 7 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 11 percent very short, 31 percent short, 56 percent adequate and 2 percent surplus.

Thirteen percent of the expected oat crop has been planted, 5 days behind last year and 2 days behind the 5-year average. There were scattered reports of oats beginning to emerge.

Below normal temperatures meant pastures remained mostly dormant. Livestock conditions were generally good although cold temperatures and moisture have been a challenge for some cattle producers as calving continues.

Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

The damp and gloomy conditions that persisted through most of the reporting period finally broke towards the end of the week. Unseasonably cold temperatures continued across Iowa with the statewide average temperature at 40.7 degrees, 3.6 degrees below normal. The cutoff low-pressure system that stagnated the weather pattern over the Upper Midwest also brought rounds of showers, both rain and snow, though much of the state experienced precipitation deficits between 0.40 to 0.60 inch.

Pockets of light showers formed in central Iowa with moderate rainfall reported later Sunday (3rd) afternoon as a low-pressure center pushed over northern Iowa. Rainfall reports at 7:00 am on Monday (4th) showed much of the state’s southeastern one-third picked up measurable totals, though most reports were under a few tenths of an inch. A swath of heavier totals was found across south-central into the southeastern corner with six stations reporting at least 0.50 inch; Le Claire Lock and Dam (Scott County) measured 0.53 inch while Fort Madison (Lee County) collected 1.02 inches. Overcast skies cleared through the afternoon hours with high temperatures registering in the low to mid-50s with light, variable winds. Southeasterly winds developed overnight into Tuesday (5th) in advance of a low-pressure system that would dominate the large-scale flow for the coming days. The low slowly moved from the Dakotas into Minnesota where it became cut off from the steering flow and remained nearly stationary. Widespread showers formed over Iowa as most stations observed at least a tenth of an inch. Iowa’s eastern quarter measured totals from 0.25 inch to near 1.00 inch in the southeastern counties; a gauge near Burlington (Des Moines County) registered 1.12 inches with a statewide average coming in at 0.21 inch. West-northwesterly flow ushered in gusty winds and pockets of light rain and snowflakes though Wednesday (6th) with highs only reaching into the 40s. Wind speeds diminished somewhat later in the evening as an upper-level weather disturbance produced additional rain and snow showers on the backside of the low pressure spinning into western Wisconsin.

Thursday (7th) was another chilly day with light precipitation falling for most of the day. Iowa’s average afternoon high was 42 degrees, 15 degrees below normal. Precipitation totals were widespread, though under 0.20 inch with Corning (Adams County) measuring 0.7 inch of snow. Morning lows prior to sunrise on Friday (8th) were hovering in the low to mid-30s under thick stratus. Cloud cover finally started to break west to east through the afternoon with northwesterly winds slowing down into the evening hours. Daytime highs rose into the low 50s in extreme western Iowa while upper 30s and 40s were reported farther east. Skies remained clear into Saturday (9th) with morning lows in the teens west to 30s east under a light westerly breeze; the average low was 25 degrees, 10 degrees below normal. A shift to a southerly wind brought the warmest daytime temperatures of the week with upper 50s and low 60s reported across much of Iowa; the statewide average high was 57 degrees, near normal for this time of year. Some stray clouds filtered into central Iowa overnight into Sunday (10th) as winds were on the increase from the southeast. Morning lows remained in the upper 30s north to mid 40 south under mostly clear skies.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from trace amounts at several stations to 1.54 inches at Maquoketa (Jackson County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.32 inch while the normal is 0.65 inch. Cedar Rapids (Linn County) and Lowden (Cedar County) reported the week’s high temperature of 69 degrees on the 9th, on average nine degrees above average. Little Sioux (Harrison County) reported the week’s low temperature of 16 degrees on the 9th, 16 degrees below normal. Four-inch soil temperatures were in the upper 30s northwest to upper 40s southeast as of Sunday.

Iowa Crop Progress & Condition

Week March 28 – April 3, 2022

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented today on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition Report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly April through November.

“Late-season snow last week, along with recent rainfall, has helped ease drought conditions across portions of the state,” said Secretary Naig. “While April precipitation outlooks point to the possibility of wetter than normal conditions, near term temperatures are forecasted to remain colder than average.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Crop Report

Precipitation and cold conditions limited Iowa farmers to 1.6 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending April 3, 2022, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. When and where possible, fieldwork activities included applying anhydrous and fertilizer, spreading manure and planting oats.

Topsoil moisture levels rated 9 percent very short, 25 percent short, 58 percent adequate and 8 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 12 percent very short, 35 percent short, 49 percent adequate and 4 percent surplus.

Seven percent of the expected oat crop has been planted, 2 days behind last year but 2 days ahead of the 5-year average.

Pastures were still mostly dormant. Livestock conditions were generally good although feedlots were wet after the week’s rain. Producers report calving is continuing.

Weather Summary
Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Unseasonably cold temperatures blanketed the state over the first reporting period of 2022 with negative departures of up to nine degrees in northwestern Iowa; the statewide average temperature was 36.1 degrees, 7.3 degrees below normal. Wetter than average conditions were reported in eastern Iowa, while precipitation deficits of up to 0.50 inch were measured in the southwest.

Northerly winds persisted through Sunday (27th) afternoon as cloud cover increased in southwestern Iowa. Daytime high temperatures were unseasonably cool with 30s and 40s reported northeast to southwest; these readings were 10 to 15 degrees below normal. Overnight lows into Monday (28th) morning varied from the upper teens in eastern Iowa to low 30s in the west. Winds shifted to an easterly direction as a dome of high pressure pushed into the Great Lakes region through the afternoon hours with temperatures rebounding into the mid to upper 40s under mostly sunny skies. Overcast conditions developed early Tuesday (29th) as gusty southeasterly winds built in ahead of a strong low-pressure center pushing into Nebraska. As a warm front lifted over southern Iowa, high temperatures rose into the mid-60s while upper 30s and 40s were observed north of the boundary. A few severe thunderstorms formed during late evening hours in southwestern Iowa and with showers overnight into central and eastern Iowa. The system continued northeast into Wednesday (30th) morning as rain tapered off and gusty northerly winds returned. Event totals were highest across the state’s southeastern third with general amounts from 0.20 inch to 0.75 inch; three stations in extreme southeastern and northwestern Iowa measured over an inch with Chariton (Lucas County) observing 1.40 inches.

As cold air filtered in behind the low-pressure system, snow showers formed over much of Iowa with most stations reporting light totals. Moderate snow fell across central Iowa with two to three-inch accumulations measured at several stations; the statewide average snowfall was 0.8 inch with Indianola (Warren County) picking up 3.2 inches. Morning lows observed at 7:00 am on Thursday (31st) ranged from the upper 20s northwest to low 30s southeast, where snowflakes were still flying. Gloomy conditions persisted through the evening hours with highs hanging in the low 30s statewide, well below average for the last day of March. Iowans woke up to starry skies and chilly conditions on Friday (1st) morning though temperatures rose as southerly winds ushered in warmer air into the afternoon. Daytime highs registered in the upper 40s north to 50s west as cloud cover increased in advance of a fast-moving disturbance that brought widespread rainfall to much of Iowa into early Saturday (2nd) morning. Most of Iowa’s stations observed measurable precipitation, both liquid and frozen, with several locations picking up a few inches of snow; Dubuque Regional Airport (Dubuque County) measured 4.5 inches. Liquid-equivalent totals were in the range of 0.25 inch to 0.75 inch with Bellevue Lock and Dam (Jackson County) reporting 0.83 inch. Clear skies returned overnight into Sunday (3rd) with lows at sunrise in the upper 20s and low 30s under variable winds.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from 0.01 inch at Bedford (Taylor County) to 1.64 inches at Davenport Municipal Airport (Scott County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.60 inch while the normal is 0.68 inch. Sioux City Airport (Woodbury County) reported the week’s high temperature of 67 degrees on the 29th, 13 degrees above average. Algona (Kossuth County) reported the week’s low temperature of 11 degrees on the 1st, which is 18 degrees below normal. Four-inch soil temperatures were in the upper 30s north to low 40s south as of Sunday.

 

 

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